The Topographical Poems of John O'Dubhagain

and Giolla Na Naomh O'Huidhrin


Edited by John O'Donovan 1862
Printed for the Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society
Dublin




O DUBHAGAIN



His country to every chief king, and to every sub-king, and to every chief of a cantred in Erin, and first to Teamhair.

O'Maolseachlainn, chief king of Teamhair and of Erin.

O hAirt, and O'Riagain, and O'Ceallaigh, and O'Conghalaigh, are its kings.

O'Ruaidhri, lord of Fionnfochla; O'Fallamhain, lord of Crioch na gCedach; O'Coindealbhain, lord of Laeghaire; and O'Braoin, lord of Luighne; O hAenghusa, lord of Ui MacUais; O hAedha, lord of Odhbha; and O'Dubhain, lord of Cnodhbha; and O hAinbhith, lord of Feara-Bile; and O'Cathasaigh, lord of Saithne; and O'Leochain, lord of Geilenga; and O'Donnchadha, lord of Teallach Modharain; and O hIonradhain, lord of Corca-Raidhe; O'Maoilmhuaidh, lord of Feara-Ceall; O'Dubhlaidhe, lord of Feara-Tulach; O'Fionnallain, lord of Deablhna-Mor; O'Maelluighdheach, lord of the Brugh; and MagCochlain, lord of Dealbhna Beathra; O'Tolairg, lord of Cuirene; These are the chief lords of Meath.

Their chieftains are these: Mag-Eochagain, chieftain of Cinel-Fiachach; Mag-Ruairc, over Cinel-Enda; O hEochadha, chief of Cinel-Aenghusa; O'Mealcallann, chief of Dealbhna Beg.

The chief lords of Teathbha are O'Catharnaigh. O'Cuinn, and Mag Confiacla, O'Lachtnain and O'Muiregain; O'Flannagain, lord of the Comar; O'Braoin, lord of Breaghmhaine; MacConmeadha, lord of Muinter-Laedhagain; Mag Aedha, lord of Muinter-Tlamain; and Mag Taidg, lord of Muinter-Siothachain; and Mag Amhalghadha, lord of Callraighe; MagCarrghamhna, over Muinter-Maoiltsionna; O'Dalaigh, lord of Corca Adam; and O Muireadhaigh, over Cinel Tlamain; O'Scolaidhe, over Western Dealbhna; O'Comhraidhe, lord of Ui MacUais; O hAedha, over Tir Teathbha; O'Cearbhaill, and O'Duinn, over Teamhair; and MacGiollasechlainn, over South Breagh; and O'Ronain, over Cairbre Gabhra; O hAneghusa, over Gailenga Bega.

Thus far the part of [the work embracing all] Meath except two lords of Fine Gall, i.e., MacGiolla Mocholmog, and Ua Dunchadha, and three
1 septs of Tuilen; O'Muircheartaigh, lord of Ui-Maine and O'Modhairn, over Cinel n-Eochain, and over the Britons.

Of which [tribes and chieftains] O'Dubhagain, ie., John Mor, a learned historian, and Ollamh of Ui-Maine, sung. The age of Christ when he died was 1372.



"Let us pass round Fodhla2
Let men go by order
From the lands in which we are;
The provinces let us go round.

Let us proceed first to Teamhair,
To the green of the fair formed fortress;
The usual embassy do not neglect,
Let all come to meet us.

Let the nobles of Erin proceed3
To Teamhair4 of the kingly fetters,-
No journey longer than this [is required],
No man shall be without a patrimony.

The noble host shall say there:
Recount to us our nobility together,
The prosperous host of each line that has not melted away,5
Enumerate the chief of each territory.

Here we begin with Teamhair -
Before [any seat of] the race of Gaedhil of merry voice,
To their tribes, to their princes,
And to their legitimate good chieftains.

Let us not make mention of Meath alone,
O'Maeileachlainn,6 it is not unjust,
The fierce tribe in remunerating the septs,
Chief kings of noble Erin.

The chieftains of Teamhair, where we are,
O hAirt
7 the noble, and O'Riagain,8,
A host which united the harbours,
O'Ceallaigh,9O'Conghalaigh.10

Of the men of Breagh,11 an approved king
Is O'Ruaidhri,12 king of Fionnfochla.
O'Fallamhain of constant prosperity,
Is goodly dynast of Crich na gCedach.13

O'Coindealbhain of troops,
Is the surpassing-wise king of Laeghaire;
14
Have your memory fixed on the beauteous branch,
O'Braoin is king of heroic Luighne.15

King of Ui-Macuais of Breagh16 the beauteous,
Is O'hAneghusa of the high family;
The branches are active and courteous;
O'hAedha over Odhbha17 of sharp weapons.

O'Dubhain over the territory of Cnodhbha,18
Over the fine flowery flood,
O'hAinbheith19 of the tribe of arms,
Is king of Feara-bile of the white carns.

King of the Saithni20 of spears,
Is red-sworded O'Cathasaigh.
O'Leochain,21 close to the glens,
Is pure king over the Gailenga.

O'Donnchadha of goodly tillages,
Is king of the smooth Teallach-Modharain,
22
O hIonradhain, nobler he
Is king of the very fine Corca-Raeidhe.23

King of Feara-Ceall24 of ancient swords,
O'Maolmhuaidh, noble the surname,
Every sword was tried by him,
He has a division to himself alone.

O'Dubhlaidhe of great prosperity,
Is king of Feara-Tulach
25 of noble lords.
Dealbhna mor26 of fair female bands,
Pure its chief O'Fionnallain.

Chief of the Brugh27 of no small prosperity,
Is O'Maollughdhach of great munificence;
Mag Cochlain, whose children are comely to behold,
King of beauteous Dealbhna-Eathra.28

O'Tolairg, a lord was not subdued,
King of Cuircne
29 of level plains.
We understand each sept above recorded,
Let us awhile approach their sub-chiefs.

We give first place to the manly sept,
The illustrious Clann-Eochagain,
Host of the girdles, comely their complexion,
Over the manly Cinel-Fiachach.
30

Mag Ruairc over the sept of Enda,31
Who never gave a [bardic] party a blank refusal;
O'Cairbre is over sweet Tuath Buadha,32
Armies over their district as I count.

O'hEochadha of great showers,
Over high Cinel Aenghusa;
33
Over Dealhbna Beg,34 brave his children,
Is O'Maelcallann, the fair and hardy.

Let us approach the lords of Teathbha,35
We ought not always to shun them,
The brown oaks of the valleys,
The protection and bounty of Erin.

Chief king of Teathfa, of whom robbers are afraid,
Is O'Catharnaigh of wounding arms,
A rod who left ploughed divisions;
Mag Cuinn
36 and O'Confiacla.37

O'Lachtnain38 of no small tillage,
O'Muireagain,39 the very bountiful,
Well have they ordained the seasons,40
These are the sub-kings [of Teathfa.]

Goodly kings of the festive Comar,41
Are O'Flannagain, plundering chief,-
Let them all be by my side,
[And] O'Braein, the melodious, over Breaghmhaine.42

Mac Conmeadha43 of the swine litters,
Over the fierce Muintir Laedhagain.
Mag Aedha44 to whom the title is given,
Over the fruitful Muintir Tlamain.

MacTaidhg,45 who is lasting in battle front,
Over the free Muintir-Siorthachain.
The fair Mag Amhalghadha, all
Over the marshes of Calraighe.46

Muintir Maoilsionna47 of hosts,
Are a fine all-victorious tribe,
MagCarrghamhna is over their battalions,
Of the stout and lordly chiefs.

The chiefs of high Corca Adhamh,48
O'Dalaigh of lasting renown;
O'Muireadhaigh of valiant arms,
Over the fair sided Muintir Tlamain.49

O'Scolaidhe of sweet stories,
Over the delightful Western Dealbhna,
50
Ui Mac Uais51 the most festive here
Have O'Comhraidhe at their head.

O hAedha52 over East Tir Teathfa,
O'Cearbhail53 over the south of Teamhair;
The land of the men has gone under bondage,
These people have not clung to their birthright.

Let us raise up for Teamhair, more
Of kings with great courage;
His yoke has tamed each battalion,
O'Duinn
54 over the districts of Teamhair.

MacGillaseachlainn the peacable
Over Southern Breagh
55 of dropping flowers;
King over the fine Cairbre Gabhrain56
Is O'Ronain, brave, the hero.

Over Lesser Gailenga, of Breagh,57
O'hAenghusa is reckoned;
Seek his protection without scruple,
He is the most splendid Meathman [of all] I have enumerated.

Of the Meathmen of Meath,
For a long period of time
Have been as tribes of chance,
The two kings of bright Fine Gall:58

MacGilla-Mocholmog, the fair,
O'Dunchadha,
59 of goodly aspect,
By them the seasons were regulated,
To prove that they were good kings.

The three septs of Tuilen60 without blemish,
In Meath, though not Meathmen,
Are the Fir-Eochain, distinguished among them
The Maini, [and] the Britons of lasting fame.

Early these men quaff their metheglin:
They are the congregation of Caernech.
Valaint are the Siol-Domhnaill of fine eyes,
King of Ui-Maine is O'Muirchertaigh.

O'Modhairn, peaceful king is he,
Over the noble Cinel-Eochain,
Who have flourished under him,
Their own Britons under them.

Let us cease from our stories
Of the smooth-grassy Meath,
From the Brugh, from Breaghmagh of laws,
To go to Teamhair, pass we.

Thus far the portion of the argument and of the poem which relates to Meath.

THE PORTION WHICH RELATES TO THE PROVINCE OF ULSTER DOWN HERE, AND FIRST OF OILECH OF THE KINGS.

O'Neill, chief king of Oilech, and Mag Lachlainn, its other chief king; O'Cathain and O'Conchobhair, two chief lords of Cianachta; O'Duibhdhiorma, lord of the Bredach; O hOgain, over Tulach Og, and O'Gairmleadhaigh, over Cinel Moain; O'Fearghail, and O'Domhnallain, and O'Donnagain, and Mag Murchadha, and Mac- Duinnchuain, and MacRuaidhri, over Teallach n-Ainbhith, and over Muinter-Birn; chief of Corca Each is O'Ceallaigh; O'Tighernaigh and O'Cearain, over Fearnmaigh; O'Maoilbreasail, and O'Baoighill, O'Cuinn, and O'Cionaetha, over Magh-Itha; O'Domhnaill, over Cinel Binnigh of the Valley, and over Cinel Binnigh of Tuath-Rois, and over Cenel Binnigh of Loch Drochaid; O'Dubh- duanaigh, and O hAghmaill and O hEitigein, over the three Teal- lachs, viz.:-Teallach Cathalin, and Teallach Duibrailbhe, and Teallach mBraenain; and O'Maoilfothartaigh, and O hEodhosa, and OhOgain, over Cinel Tighearnaigh; O'Cuanach and O'Baeth- ghalaigh, over Clann-Fearghusa; O'Bruadair, and O'Maelfabhaill, and O hOgain, over Carrac Brachaighe; O'Murchadha and O'Meal- lain, over Siol-Aedha of Eanach; and Mag Fiachrach, over Cenel Feradhaigh.

Siol-Airnin, and Siol-Maoilfabhaill, and Clann-Cathmhaoil on the north side; the two tribes, the most noble of Cinel-Fer adhaigh, are Teallach-Maoilgeimhridh, and Teallach Maoilpatraic.

THE PART OF OIRGHIALLA HERE.

O'Cearbhaill, O'Duibhdara, and O'Lairgnen, full kings of Oir-ghialla, and the MacMathghamhnas after them; O'Flaithri, chief king of Uladh; O'Floinn and O'Domhnallain, lords of Ui-Tuirtre; O hEirc, over Ui-Fiachrach Finn; O Cridain, lord of the Mach- aire; O hAedha, over Feara Fearnmhagh; and O'Caomhain, lord of Magh-Leamhna; and O'Machaidhen, lord of Mughdhorn; O hIr and O hAnluain, two lords of the Oirtheara; O'Cosgraigh, lord of Feaera-Rois; O hInnrechtaigh, lord of Ui-Meith; O'Baoigheallain, lord of Dartraighe; Muintir Taithligh, and Muinter Maoileduin, chiefs of Laeghaire; and Mag Tighearnain, over Clann-Feargh-aile, O'Flannagain, chief of Tuath-ratha; MacGillefinnen, chief of Muintir Feodachain; MacGillamichil, chief of Ui- Conghail; Muintir Maoilruana, and the O hEgnighs, two lords of Feara-Monach; MacCionaoth, lord of the Triocha Ched; and O'Corbmaic, over Ui-MacCarthainn; and O'Gairbhith, over Ui- Breasail-Macha; O'Longain, and O'Duibheamhna, and O'conchobh- air, over Ui Breasail, the Western; and the O'Lorcains and O'Heg- nighs, over Clann-Cearnaigh; O'Domhnaill and O'ruadhagain, two chiefs of Ui-Eathach; O'duibhthire, over the Clanna- Daimhin; and Ui Maoilcraoibhe, over Clann-Duibhsionnaigh; O'Lachtnain, over Little Modhairn; and O hAinbhith, over Ui- Seaain; Mag Uidhir, over Feara-Manach; O'Colgain and O'conaill, over Ui MacCarthainn.

THE PART OF THE CRAOBH RUADH HERE.

O'Duinnsleibhe and O hEochadha, chief kings of Uladh; Ui- Aidith, and Ui Eochadhain, and the Ui Labhradha, and Ui Leth- lobhra, Ui Loingsigh, and Ui Morna, and Ui Mathghamhna, O'Gairbhith, and O hAinbhith, sub-kings of Ui Eachach; MacAen- ghusa, over clann-Aedha; MacArtain, over Cenel Foghartaigh; MacDuibheamhna, over Cenel Amhalghadha; the Ui Morna and MegDuilechain, over Clann Breasail; O'Coltarain, over Dal-Cuirb.

THE PART OF CINEL CONAILL HERE

O'Maoldoraidh, and O'Canannain, and the Clann Dalaigh, chief kings of Cenel Conaill; O'Baoighill, over Clann-Cennfaelaidh, and over Tir-Ainmire, and over Tir Boghaine; O'Maoilmaghna, over Magh Sieridh, and O hAedha, over Eas Ruaidh; O'Taircheirt, over Clann Neachtain; Mag Dubhain, over Cinel Nenna; Mag Loing- seachain, over Gleann Binne, and O'Breslen, over Fanaid; and O'Dochartaigh, over Ard-Miodhair; and MacGillesamhais, over Ros-Guill; O'Cearnachain and O'Dalachain, over Tuath Bladhaigh; O'Maelagain, over Tir MacCarthainn; O'Donnagain, over Tir Brea- sail, and Mag Gaiblin also; O'Maolgaoithe, over Muinter-Mael- gaoithe; Mag Tighernain, over Clann Fearghaile.

It was the province of Ulster the same man sung [as follows] i.e., O'Dubhagain.



Let us pass into the lands of Uladh,61
From Tailtltin62 of lordly champions,
From Breaghmagh,63 from Meath out,
From the spreading tribe of Teamhair.

We shall not halt till we reach to Oileach,64
To the race of Eoghan65 of valiant arms,
Who have obtained the palm for greatness without fraud,
The acme of the noblity of Erin.

This saying is no hidden saying
Circulated by the historians,
Exuberance of princely houses and banquets,
Every one flocks to Eoghan.

Kingly O'Neill66 of great prosperity,
and the very proud MacLachlains,
A race of no hereditary tameness,
Two tribes of the soverignty.67

Ten cantreds, no difficult partition,
The ten sons68 of red-armed Eoghan got,
Delightful too what they saw under them,
And which they have as true patrimony.

Of the race of Eoghan of valour,
The fair king of Cianachta
69 is O'Cathain,
His host in each quarter are mild towrds you;
Of the race of Tadhg, son of Cian of Caisel,
Tribe of abundant fruit, with brilliance,
O'Conchobhair70 was its first king.

O'Duibhdiorma71 of high pride,
Chief of ever noble Bredach.72
Well has it found the strength of its ancients,
The noblest sept of [the race of] Eoghan,
A tribe which has prospered without peace,
Of Bredach is the sept of the chieftaincy.

A stout chief over Tulach Og,73
O hOgain,74 chief of white roads,
The plough has passed through every wood for it,
Another O hOgain75 is near it.

Many the heroes with spears
Of the active O'Gairmleadhaighs,
76
A fort of flaming girdles without misfortune,
Over the majestic race of Moen.77

The O'Ferghails of healthy exertion,
The O'Domhnallains
78 of red faces,
Heavy kindling on hill slopes by you
The O'Donnagains,79 MacMurchadas.80

The MacDuinnchuains,81 MacRuaidhris82 gentle,
Over Teallach Ainbhith83 the formidable,
They are not heard to be dry at their house,
Are over the victorious Muinter Birn;84

Chieftains of high Cinel-Eachach85
Are just judging Muintir Cheallaigh.
The O'Ciarains86 great over the Fearamaigh,
And the heavy Siol-Tighearnaigh.

The men of noble Mag Iotha87
Who defended the confines,
Delightful their habits in every church,
[Are] the O'Maoilbreasails and the O'Baoighills.
Their dwellings over the house of each hero,
The brave O'Cuinns88 and O'Cionaiths.89

The fine Cinel Binnigh90 of the Glen,
Chieftains who worship the truth.
The Cinel Binnigh of Tuath Rois,
Ye may escape from it in its absence.

The Cinel Binnigh of no lasting servitude,
Of the rapid-waved Loch Drochaid.
Towers who have shivered every spear,
O'Domhnaill is here goodly chieftain;

In one tribe the O'Duibhduannas,91
What poet has not truly heard it?
Speech without slowness, what I say,
The O hAghmaills,92 and O hEitigeins.93

Are over the three tribes in the eastern heath,
Teallach Cathalain of troops.
For their purchase how polished the poem,
And the majestic Teallach Braonain,

Teallach Dubhroilbhe the righteous,
They well cling to their patrimony.
Bright men of fame at their home,
These are the three tribes.

Over Cinel Tighearnaigh the stout,
O'Maolfothartaigh
94 I reckon,
Good their knowledge and their luck,
The O hEodhusas95 and the O hOgains.96

The Clanns of Fergus view ye,
Know their vigorous chieftains;
Victorious over [foes] in every hill,
Are the Clann-Cuanach, the Clann-Baothghalaigh.

Over the lasting Carraic Brachaidhe,97
Over the red-armed Clann Fergusa.
On each side they extended to the wave,98
The O'Bruadairs, the O'Maoilfabhaills,
The O'Coinnes, the O hOgains here,
Elevation of human people.

Speak of the Siol Aedha of Eanach,99
Their chieftains and their tribes,
To them the meeting was not thin,
The O'Murchadhas,100 and the O'Mellains.101

In the festive Cinel Fearadhaigh,102
Constantly noble [are] their genealogies,
The O'Fiachras on the stout south side,
their heroic fight I lament not.

The Siol-Airnin on the north side.
And the red-armed Siol-Maoilfabhaill,
A clan without disgrace from their arms,
And the warlike Clann Cathmhaoil.

The two eastern septs are over every tribe,
In the high Cinel Fearadhaigh,
Teallach Maoilgeimhridh without theft,
And the white-fingered Teallach Maoilpatraig.

Let us quit the mead-drinking tribe,
Let us stop from treating of the sept of Feradhach,
Let us ask the line of each learned man,
From the high race of Eoghan pass we. Let us pass.



OIRGHIALLA HERE103

Pass forward quickly away,
Leave the assembly of the noblity,
Their tribute take ye with their hostages,104
Halt not till [ye come] to the Oirghialla.

O'Cearbhaill,105 O'Duibhdara,106
Chief kings without fratricide,
Men who have attended on each poet,
Are over the Oirghialla without reproach.

Chief kings in place of these,
Are the MacMathghamnas
107 and Maguidhir;108
Well with you their clemency, their rule,
They are the noblest races of the Oirghialla.

Hereditary in him to succeed to lordship,
O'Lairgnen
109 is full king of Oirghialla,
he is no imbecile without fine vigour,
O'Flaithri 110 is chief king of Uladh.

The kings of Ui-Tuirtre111 of heavy slaughters,
O'Flainn,112 of them is O'Domhnallain,113
O hEirc over Ui-Fiachrach Finn,114
Without concealing battles and conflicts.

King over the smooth meady plain,
Is O'Criodain
115 over tribes,
O hAedha116 over another tribe,
Noble over Feara Fearnmaighe.117

O'Caomhain,118 head of the battle,
King of Magh Leamhna119 of hero-fort,
Noble the battle-island of goblets,
O'Mochoidhein,120 king of Mughdhorna.121

Two kings over Oirtheara,122 through pride,
O hIr,123 and O hAnluain,124
O'Cosgraigh,125 king of smooth Feara-Rois,126
Every triumph opens at their march.

The kings of Ui-Meith Macha127 without decay,
O hInnreachtaigh128 of high plunders,
A rod who has divided the party,
MacDomhnaill129 over clann Ceallaigh.130

A blue-eyed white-handed host,
Are the red-mouthed Muinter Baoigheallain,131
Griffins of no ill-shaped horses,
Are the bold kings of Dartraighe.132

Over the Ui-Laeghaire of Loch-Lir,133
The Muinter Tiathligh are chieftains;
The Muinter-Maoilduin134 of Lurg, who are not weak,
Deep their swords in battle.

Mac Tighernain, a lord of fame,
Is over the celebrated Clann Fearghaile,
135
Tuathratha,136 peaceable without strife,
Is entirely under O'Flannagain.

Muinter Pheodachain137 of the bank,
chieftains of noblest riches.
Melodious men of the level plain, I conceal not,
The prosperous Mac Giolla Finnen.

It is right to guide and to protect them,
The brave chieftains of Ui Conghaile,
138
A beauteous tribe, in fight like griffins,
The majestic Mac Gillemichils.

The prosperous Muintir Maoilruana,139
The Ui hEignigh140 of lofty pride;
It is not one trade I see with their battalion,
Two kings over the good slopes of Monach.141

King over the cantred of Cladach,142
Mac Cionaith ye have heard,
A scion, though hearty, martial;
He is a Meathian, though an Oirghiallian.

O'Corbmaic,143 the brave, with his sept,
Over the valiant Ui MacCarthainn,
Of the great Ui-Breasail of Macha,144
The O'Gairbhiths are the fierce chiefs.

The O'Longains,145 O'Duibheamhnas,146
The O'Conchobhairs147 of fair faces,
Are all of the western Ui-Breasail,
by whom every great man is served.

Over the high eastern Ui-Breasail
Are the Ui Lorcain,
148 brave their strife;
The scions who serve at their house,
The OhEignighs,149 over Clann-Cearnaigh.

The O'Domhnaills, men of long hedges,
And the prosperous Clann-Ruadhagain;
Men of noblest heart at the battle,
The two noble tribes of Ui-Eathach.
150

The tribe of Duibhthire, over the land,
Over the fair-shaped clanns of Daimhin,151
The Ui-Maoilcraoibhe152 I shall mention to you,
Over the hawk-like Clann-Duibhsinnaigh.

O'Lachtnain over Little Modharn,153
His superiors are not found;
O hAinbhith, of no stubborn meeting,
Is lord over noble Ui-Seaain.154

Mag Uidhir155 is head of their battalion,
Over the majestic Feara Monach,
Good his gifts at his house,
The chief most illustrious for hospitality.

Over the brave Ui MacCarthainn,156
royal, very great chieftains,157
Royal and very fine their lands,
O'Colgan and O'Conaill.

To conceal them we ought not;
Farther into Uladh let us pass;
Though sweet to separate under honours,
We shall dwell no longer on the Oirghialla.



THE PART OF THE CRAEBH RUADH

Let us lift our heads at Craebh Ruadh,158
Let us enumerate the chief kings of Uladh,159
The lands of hospitality, with spears,
The O'Duinnsleibhes,160 the O hEachadhas.161

Of their nobles are men of long slaughters,
The O hAidiths,
162 O hEochagains;163
Great acquisitions are their plunders,
The O'Labhradhas,164 the O'Leathlobhras,165

The O'Loingsighs,166 of stout champions,
And the O'Mornas,167 smooth and ruddy.
We have made a visitation of their territories;
Let us discontinue from enumerating the high kings.
[p. 37] Hereditary to their chieftains are acquisitions;
Of their chieftains are the O'Mathghamhnas.168

The sub-chiefs of Ui-Eachach Cobha,169
Who were powerful anciently,
How tasteful at the meeting in each territory,
Are O'Coinne,170 the active, O'Gairbhith.171

O hAinbhith172 was chief king there;
He was not neglected, we shall not omit him;
Neither his prosperity nor his career has been checked,
Proud his battalion when marching.

Chief over noble Clann-Aedha
Is Mag Aenghusa,
173 lofty, splendid,
They have chosen the warm hill,
They have taken all Uladh.

MacArtain has by charter
The steady-stout Cinel-Faghartaigh,
174
Who never refuse gifts to the poets;
They are the treasury of hospitality.

The Mag Dubheamhnas175 without plunder,
Are over the high Cinel-amhalghadha,
The O'Mornhas,176 stock of victory,
Are the props of hard-armed Uladh.

The Mag Duilechains,177 of the angles,
Over the red-haired Clann Breasial.
O'Coltarain,178 of the border town,
Is dwelling over the Dal Cuirb.

There has been collected within in the north-east,
The stock of the noblity in Uladh,
Goodly heroes, by whom parties are wounded,
The forge of the hospitality of Erin.

The palm of the valour of Leath Chuinn,179
The acme of victory and conflict,
Many a brughaidh180 on their hills;
The Ulidians and the Eirennaighs.

Difficult to go away from Eamhain,181
From Craebhruadh of large weapons;
But though we have [to survey] numerous possessions to the west,
Our minds shall but pass slowly.

Let us pass from peaky Boirche,182
And from Cuailgne183 land of cloaks,
From Magh Rath184 of fierce contention,
And from the hero-battalion of O'Labhradha.185

From Dun da leathghlas186 of cloaks,
Which is the royal cemetery of Erin,
Without forgetting that I was there,
Where the clay covered Columb.187

In the same grave was buried,
Brighid, boast of our female bands;
As we leave them every victory,
Patrick of Macha is in the great grave.

The victory of Erin is with the Ultai,
With the host of the fair Cumber;188
Fetters by which she obtained plunder,
Noblity of Erin are the Eoghanachs.189

Head of Erin is great Ard Macha,190
Not nobler is their high chieftains;
The men of the world have their knowledge there:191
Without injury from the three pass we. Let us pass.




THE PART OF THE TIR CHONAILL

Our journey is a tour of prosperity,
Let us leave the vigorous host of great Macha,
Let us not refuse good luck to the people,
Let us proceed to Cinel-Conaill.
192

Let them come, a journey of prsperity;
Rugged193 is the land of this tribe;
To meet us at the Cataract of Aedh,194
The properity of the splendid-faced people.

The O'Maoildoraidhs,195 if they were living,
Would come (but they will not come),
Without slowness, or slow delay,
To meet us, as would the O'Canannains.

But others will come, stout their chief,
The Clanna-Dalaigh196 of brown shields;
With them, through contest, has not withered,
Heirship to the Sovereignty.

The Clann-Chinnfhaelaidh197 of the white steeds,
And the beauteous Tir-Ainmirech,198
I see the host with swords,
And the fierce men of Tir-Baghaine.199

This is the share of the haughty hosts,
The land of O'Baoighill
200 of ruddy mouth,
The fair host over at their house,
They have a large share of the lands.

O'Maoilmaghna over Mag Seiridh,201
Of poet hosts it has not been long concealed.
O hAedha over prosperous Eas Ruaidh,202
Active in the battle each heavy host.

With O'Tairchert203 of heavy bands,
Are the fair bright Clann-Neachtain;204
Mac Dubhain205 who has spread stories,
Over the bright fine Cinel-Enda.206

Gleann Binnigh207, noble the list of chiefs,
Is with the populous Mag Loingseachain;
Vehemently has he bounded to each fight,
O'Breislen, the generous, in Fanaid.208

A battle-armed host which is not treacherous,
Is over Ard-Modhair
209 of irriguous slopes;
Men who have been found valiant,
Are proving it to O'Dochartaigh.

To MacGillatsamhais210 the stout,
Belong Ros-Guill211 and Ros-Iorguil,212 I reckon;
A host without boasting or falsehood,
O'Furadhrain over Fionnros.213

Two other chieftains, it is certain to you,
Are over the victorious Tuath-Blachach,
214
Of them is O'Cearnachan215 of valour,
Some of whose properities I have proved.

Of them is the royal host of prosperous tribes,
The bountiful Muintir Dalachain.216
I mention, without good verses, to you,
Their names and their country.

Tir MacCarthainn217 of plundering slaughters,
Belongs to the high-minded Siol-Maolagan,218
To put them in our poem it is our judgment,
There was a time when we would not repent of it.

Tir Breasail,219 land of fruit,
Has two tribes over it;
Great the long prosperity in their land,
The O'Donnagains, the MacGaibhidhs.

Muinter Maoilgaoithe, the wounding,
By whom the land of foreigners was burned;
Learned men under the tree of lances,
O'Maoilgaoithe
220 is their fine chieftain.

MacTighearnain, the fine, the brave,
Is over the steady Clann-Fearghaile;
221
Great hosts are in good prosperity with this people;
Let us make our way from Cinel Conaill.

The victory and hardihood of the race of Niall
Is with Conall in his career,
A host who were not slow in attending us;
From Conall, however, pass we. Let us pass.

So far the portion relating to Ulster of the matter [argument]
and of the poem.



THE PART RELATING TO CONNAUGHT, AS FOLLOWS:-

O'Conchubhair, chief king of Connaught; O'Flannagain, O'Mailmordha, O'Carthaigh and O'Mughroin, the four dynasts of Clann-Cathail; O'Maoilbhrenainn over Clann-Conchubhair; O'Cathalain over Clann-Faghartaigh; and O'Maonaigh over Clann-Murthuile; and Mag Oirechtaigh over Muinter Roduibh; O'Finachta over Clann-Connmhaigh; and another O'Finachta over Clann-Murchdha; and O'Conceannainn over Ui-Diarmada; and MacMurchadha over Clann-Tomaltaigh; O'Fallamhain over Clann-Uadachs; MacDiarmada over Magh Luirg, Airtech and Tir Oilella, and over Tir-Thuathail, and the territory of Fir Tire, and Clann-Cuain, and over Tir-Nechtain, and Tir-Enda.

THE PART RELATING TO BRIEFNE.

O'Ruairc is chief king of Breifne; Mag Thighearnain over Teallach Dunchadha; Mag Shamhradhain over Teallach Eathach; and MacConsnamha over Clann-Chionaith; and MacCagadhain over Clann-Fearmaighe; and Mag Dorchaidhe over Cinel-Luachain; and Mag Flannchadha over Dartraighe; O'Finn and O'Ceabhaill over Callraighe; O'Raghallaigh over Muinter Maoilmordha; O'Cruinn over Muinter Giollagain; and Mag Maoiliosa over Magh Breacraighe; and Mag Finbhairr over Muinter Geradhain; and Mag Raghnaill over Muintir Eolais; and O'Maoilmiadhaigh over Magh Neise; O'Cuinn over Muintir Fearghail; O'Maoilchluiche over the two Cairbres; O hEaghra and O hUathmharain and O'Cearnachain and O'Gadhra, lords of Luighne; O'Dobhailen and O'Duinchthaigh, lords of Corann; Mageoch and Mag Maonaigh and Mag Riabhaigh were the three old chiefs of Magh Luirg; O'Dubhda, lord of Ui-Fiachrach of the north from the Rodhba to the Codhnach; O'Muireadhiagh, O'Gormog, and O'Tighearnaigh over Ceara; O'Birn over Muintir Mannachain; MacBrenain and O'Maoilmichil over Corco-Echlann; O hAinlighe over Cinel Dobhtha; O'Ceithernaigh and O'Ceirin over Ciarraighe Maighe; O'Maoilmuaidh over Clann-Taidhg; and O'Floinn over Clann-Maoilruain; O'Rothain over Caille Fithaidh; Mac-Sgaithghil over Corco-Mogha; and O'Braoin over Loch Gealgosa; O'Maille over the two Umhalls; O'Talcharain over Conmaicne-Cuile; and O'Cadhla over Conmaicne-mara; MacConroi over Gnomor; and O hAdhnaidh over Gnobeg; MacAodha over Clann-Coscraigh; O'Flaithbheartaigh over Muinter Murchadha; O'hEidhin, and MacGiollacheallaigh, and the O'Cleirighs, over Ui-Fiachrach Finn; and O'Duibhghiolla over Cinel Cinnghamhna; and MacFiachra over Oga Beathra; and O'Cathain over Cinel-Sedna; and O'Maghnua over Caenraighe; and O'Seachnasaigh and O'Cathail, two chiefs of Cinel Aedha.

THE PART RELATING TO UI-MAINE.

O'Ceallaigh, chief lord of Ui-Maine; O'Conaill is lord from the Grian to the head of the plain; O'Neachtain, and O'Maeilalaidh, two lords of Maenmhagh; O'Mainnin, and the Mac an bhairds, and O'Scurra, and O'Leannain, and O'Cassain, and O'Giallaigh, and O'Maigin, whichever of them is lord is sub-king over the others during his reign; O'Cathail, O'Mughroin, and O'Maoilruana, the three lords of Crumhthan; O'Laedhog is sub-king of the Caladh; O'Madadhain over Siol-Anmchadha, and O hUallachain also; and MacEidedhain over Clann-Diarmada north and south; and Mac giolla-Fhinnagain, and O'Cionaoith, over Clann-Flaitheamhain; and O'Domhnallain over Clann-Breasail; and O'Donnchadha over Clann-Cormaic of Maenmhagh; and O'Duibhghinn over Eidhneach; and O'Gabhrain over Dal Druithne; and O'Maoilbrighde, chief of Magh Finn.


Let us pass, - it is not a pleasant journey,
From the host of Macha
222 great, and delightful,
It is not wisdom, but delay, not to proceed
Over the Drobhaois223 to the plain of Cruachan.224

At the fenced Cruachain let us take a survey,
South, north, west, east-wards,
Their tribes and their lands,
And their septs let us visit.

Let us divide, may it be a happy project,
At Cruachan, the Clann-Conchobhair,
225
Bards wit us in every poem shall rise up,
From Cill Ard226 to Tuaim Drecoin.227

The kings of the hosts do not deny,
At the great smooth-grased Cruachan,
Who were not lowered by want of produce,
Their stock are the Clann Conchobhair.

Hereditary to the Ui-Fiachrach,228 north and south,
And to their tribes, through constant victory,
Is the visitation of their hosts at Ath Slisin.229
Hereditary to the Ui-Ruairc230 is that kingdom.

Hereditary to this race beyond all,
To the Sil-Muireadhaigh231 of flat forts,
A heroic tribe watching it,
Is the kingdom of bushy Cruachan,

The race of Duach Teangumha232 of fine hair,
The Sil-Flaithbheartaigh,233 the Clann-Cosgraigh,234
As they have not remained behind, I shall not omit them,
They seized on the fine province.

The Clann-Maoilruana,235 the choicest,
And the Clann-Conchobhair236 we sing;
The tribe is seen without a steward,
They are both one tribe.237

Remember the Clann-Cathail238 beyond all,
With their number of usual kings,
Their deeds of bounty are enumerated in the east,
Equal to the noble kings of the O'Roduibhs.

Four levying chieftains
Are over the valorous Clann-Cathail;
A valiant bulwark, who were not dispraised,
Are the four to be reckoned.

O'Flannagain, chief of the land,
O'Maoilmordha
239 whom I praise,
To live how splendid the tribe,
The Majestic O'Carthaigh,240 and O'Mughroin.241

O'Maoilbhrennainn242 with fame,
Over the irriguous plain of Clann-Conchobhair,
Their children are entitled to be above every tribe,
That sept of the Clann-Cathail.

O'Cathalain is chartered
Over the green-grassed Clann-Foghartaigh,
243
Not feeble is their heavy flood for you.
The Clann-Murthuile244 belong to O'Maenaigh.

To Mag Oireachtaigh245 of the steeds,
Belong Muintir Roduibh of royal judgments;
A lord not withered over the flourishing wood,
O'Finachta over Clann-Conmhaigh.246

Over Clann-Murchadha247 of the chiefs,
O'Finachta, high, perfect;
Two of the royal sept are the two parties,
Though they are one tribe, they are not equal.

Of the Ui-Diarmada,248 the worthy,
Of true words, kings of royal men,
Chiefs of the land without difficult contracts,
The O'Conceanainns in their headship.

The Mag Murchadhas of brave effort,
Over the fine-sided Clann-Tomaltaigh,
249
An act of their good prosperity [lives] after them,
[They are] of the spirited Siol-Muireadhaigh.

The Siol-Fallamhain250 before every tribe,
Over the Clann-Uadach of winy banquets;
Men who have not withered are these scions;
Of them are the noble clanns.

The Clann-Maoilruana251 of prosperity,
Their match for goodness I have never heard;
Fine their borders, beautiful each feature,
Magh Luirg252 they possess, and Airtech.253

Tir-Oilella254 and Tir-Tuathail,255
After going down beyond noble Cruachan,
Not deficient of tribes is the division to be mentioned,
The territory of Fir-Tire256 and Clann-Chuan.257

Tir-Nechtain and Tir-Enda,258
They are free without sorrow;
Generous hearted men, who received valour;
To MacDiarmada, they are hereditary.

From the spirited Sil-Muireadhaigh,
Let us pass intothe territory of Sen-Fergal,259
To the host of Breifne of ripened sense,
It is time, though no slow passing.

Let us pass.

Chief king of Breifne260 of lasting sway,
Is O'Ruairc,261 to whom the tribute of Connacht is due;262
The sub-kings of that region are not scarce,
With their chiefs around them.

MacTighearnain263 of cloaks,
Support of the fair Gaoidhil;
The purchaser of the poets, and their friend,
Is over the vehment Teallach Dunchadha.

Mac Samhradhain,264 know of every strength,
Over the illustrious Teallach Eachdhach;
His land is not rendered ugly by the wind,
Mac Consnamha265 is over Clann-Chionaoith.

McCagadhain,266 circle of fame,
Is over the noble Clann-Fearmaighe,
Mag Dorchaidh,267 of no condemned law,
Over the heroic Cinel-Luachain.

The three chiefs of Dartraighe,268 I shall name,
And of Calraighe269 of the tribes,
Their acquisitions have injured the slopes,
O'Finn the brave and O'Cearbhaill.
They do not go among the rabble at the feast,
And the majestic Mag Flannchadhas.

Royal chieftain of rough incursions,
O'Raghallaigh
270 of red arms.
The sweet sound of his golden voice is heard,
We would wish to tarry there,
Awhile, from this land let us pass.

Let us pass, may it be a passage of prosperity,
On a visit to the race of Fergus,271
To the other active people,
To the prosperous race of Rudhraigh.

Of Muinter-Giollagain of plunders,
O'Cuinn
272 is lord and captain,
Mac Maoiliosa of fine horses,
Has his tributes on Magh-Breacraighe.273

Mag-Finnbhairr,274 delightful his fine prosperity,
Over the pleasant Muintir-Geradhain.
Mag-Raghnaill275 is heard now,
Over the active Muinter-Eolais.

The gentle Muintir-Maoilmiadhaigh,276
Over Magh-Nisi of strong hostages.
Good was the dividend acquired by wounds.
Let us enumerate the chiefs of the tribes.

Muintir-Fearghail,277 and not now,
In the sovereignty over the Clann-Fearguis;
Against every tribe they exert their venom,
The O'Cuinns are their seniors.

Let usd pass westwards, it is a strenuous exertion,
Let us return to Connacht,
To the plain of Cairbre,278 let us not conceal it,
Let us approach the plunder-plain.

Well for the heavy-haired host in the west,
For the Connacht-men, is our journey;
In the province, of the race of Niall,
Are the two Cairbres of smooth-ditched districts.

Plain of the game, tract of the prospects,
O'Maoilcluiche
279 is their head leader.
Let us go forward into Luighne,280
Let us leave behind the territory of Cairbre.

Let us commemorate the Clanna-Cein,281
In the active sharp-armed Luighne.
The kings of Luighne of famed tribes,
Are O hEaghra282 and O hUathmharain.283

Look over Luighne of the full lakes,
Make a commemoration of the Ui-Cearnachain;
284
Good is every habitation of that people;
O'Gadhra285 is of that fine race.

O'Dobhailen286 of good fame,
O'Duinncathaigh287 of the kernes.
I am praying for them affectionately,
Two kings of the level plain of Corann.288

The old chiefs of full Magh-Luirg,289
We ought not to omit them,
Mag-Eoch,290 Mag-Maonaigh291 the great,
And Mag Riabhaigh292 of the royal hosts.

Proceed we to the land of Ui-Fiachrach,293
To the sweet host of the rough conflicts,
From forth the uncovetous host
It is not kind to depart, though we pass.

Let us pass.

From the Codhnach294 of the fairy flood,
The mark of the boundary,
To the limit of Rodhba;295 to be mentioned,
It is a beautiful full territory.

There is not narrower than this,
With O'Dubhda
296 of territory.
Fourteen kings of this people,
Obtained the province [of Connaught] without division,

Through deeds of exertion and battle,
Of the illustrious race of Fiachra.
O'Muireadhaigh
297 with spirit,
O'Gormog,298 O'Tighearnaigh.299
A people who have the most valorous mind,
Over the rugged beauteous Ceara.300

Let us commemorate the three Tuathas,301
The steady host of fair Cruachan.
Let us not spoil their untarnished splendour,
Let us name their three lords.

The Muintir-Birn,302 brave the battle fence,
In the fortresses of the O'Mannachains.
Through conflict, through vigour and threatening,
Theirs is the county into which they came.

The Clann Branain, powerful their vigour,
And the majestic O'Maoilmhichils.
The sway of this tribe, not feeble,
Extends over the wealthy Corca-Sheachlann.
303

Hereditary to the keen-armed tribe of O hAinlighe,
Is Cinel-Dobhtha,
304 the fast rugged.
I have no affection in my heart,
For the sept of the O hAinlighes.

Let us leave Cinel-Fechin305 for a while,
Let us turn to them our back at once,
They have been weakened for some time,
They have degenerated from their ancestors.

Over the smooth Ciarraighe of the plain,306
Is Mac Ceithearnaigh,307 the sensible.
We proclaim their right to you,
Of that tribe is Clann Cheirin.308

The Clann-Taidhg,309 the prosperous Siol-Maoilruana,310
A steady, fierce, active host.
O'Maoilmuaidh and O'Floinn the generous,
The two tribes have got rule over them.

There is another small angle,
Caille-Fothaidh,
311 let us not omit it,
Chief of white-stoned goblets and lances,
O'Rothlain is their royal chieftain.

Mac Sgaithghil312 of beautiful studs
Is over Corca Mogha of affection,
The flower of flourishing beauty now,
O'Braoin is over Loch Gealgosa.313

Eochaidh,314 senior of the great Ui Briuin,
Was your ancestor - your progenitor,
Not slow are your flood exactions,
O, Clann Maille,315 of the sea-sent treasures.

Every land is against you in this;
Ye inhabit the two Umhalls.

A good man never was there
Of the Ui-Maille but [he was] a sea-man;
The prophets of the weather
316 are ye,
A tribe of friendship and brotherhood.

Over Conmaicne Cuile,317 it ws heard -
Is O'Talcharain I have mentioned.
Over the great Conmaicne-mara318
Rules O'Cadhla,319 friend of mede drinking.

Of Conmaicne of Dun mor,320 the vigorous,
Weak are now the chieftains,
Fine angle of the poets beyond every division,
From Sighlinn321 eastwards to the Shannon.

Mac Conroi quietly reigns
Over Gno-mor,
322 of smooth marshes,
O'hAdhnaidh on Gno-Beg323 the lasting,
A nest not indigent or perishable.

The race of Mac Aodha on the east side
Over the extensive Clann Cosgraigh,
324
A majestic host who love mede,
Beauteous and generous are their tribes.

The race of Murchadh,325 of the lovely fortress,
Belong to the vigorous Muintir-Flaithbheartaigh,
To shun their conflict is lawful,
To them belongs the watching of the fair harbours.

Let us approach Aidhne326 of the steeds,
Their nobles and their hospitality;
Let us follow their kings who are not few,
Let us touch on the race of noble clans.

Let us mention Aidhne, a deed without condition,
Let us leave the tribes of Connacht,
Let us speak sweetly of their chiefs,
Let us report the chiefs of Ui-Fiachrach.327

The Clan of Mac Gilla Ceallaigh328 the honorable,
The Ui Eidhin329 of the beautiful slender steeds,
The defence of their pride is on their arms,
Of the race of Guaire of fine eye-lashes.

Good the heroes and festive
The Ui Cleirigh,
330 who are of their race.
Over the fine Cinel-Cinngamhna331
Are the Ui Duibhghiolla, and of their territory.

Profitable the strand and the flood
of the O'Maghnas, who are over the plain of Caenraighe;
332
Two kings of the Cinel-Aedha333 there are,
O'Seachnasaigh, whom we shall not shun,
And of the same race is O'Cathail of poets,
Smooth their plain and their fine mountain.

Let us approach Echtge334 of the vales,
Let us search the extensive land,
Let us infuse vigour into every townland,
Let us sit in the plain of Maonmhagh.335
On the plain of Caradh336 to which Grian is near,337
Better is our tarrying than our departing.

The great third of Connacht338 is that plain
of the Ui-Maine, of great assemblies,
From the Sionainn339 of the fairy flood, to Meadha hill,340
'tis no small kingship.

The share of O'Conaill341 of that territory,
Of that beautiful uneven land,
[Extends] from Grian342 to the head of the great plain,
A host obey the royal chieftains.

The kings of Meanmhagh of chiefs
To whom the brown plain is hereditary,
Two who have possessed that side,
Are O'Neachtain
343 and O'Maolalaidh.344

Their fight is overpowering in the conflicts,
Their's is the land as far as the Ui-Fiachrach,345
The six Sodhans346 let us not shun,
Their kings shall not be neglected.

Good the host of plundering incursions,
To whom the spear-armed array is due,
O'Cathail, O'Mudhroin the rapid,
O'Maoilruanaidh of royal banquests.

Trees sheltering the rich irriguous land,
Are kings of Crumhthann,
347 woody district,
The Ui Laodhogs, heroes whom we shun not,
King of the Caladh348 of wide border.

Men by whom was taken into their possession,
The Caladh of the bright-waved Sionainn,349
Chieftains of ever-during good fame,
Are over the plain of Ui-Anmchadha.350

Lord of rough fetters of good success,
O'h-Uallachain of envenomed arms,
Speak quickly of that part,
Their chieftains and their principal sub-chiefs.

As the lands are hereditary under them,
Mention every district carefully.
Precedence for bounty and renown,
Give to Mac Eitteagain
351 the noble;

Mention him for the activity of his troops
And the prosperity of his royal honor.
The Clann Diarmada north and south,
To mention them in my poem is lawful.

Mac Giolla Fionnagain352 the bounteous,
And the brave Clann-Cionaoith,353
Two septs of majestic bands
Over the magnificent Clann-Flaithemain.

Noble their blood and their deeds,
The Ui Domhnallain
354 of fair features,
Who burst with floods of conflicts,
Over the yellow-haired Clann-Breasail.

O'Donnchadha355 without blackness,
The Ui Cormaic356 of great Maomagh,
To the right of the Lathach357 outside,
This land belongs to these chieftains.

Treat of Inis Duibhginn358 the brown,
The twelve bailes of O'Duibhginn,
Who cemented the land of the chiefs,
That royal chief is brother to a king.

O'Docomhlain359 I mention,
Over the high point of Eidhnech;
he is no shy slender chieftain
O'Gabhrain of Dal Druithne.

Chief of brave Magh-Finn,360
To whom Brighit361 gave a blessing,
Noble his host of exertion hitherto,
O'Maoilbrighde lasting, manly.

Good has he done to each person,
The majestic chief of Bredach.362



THE PART RELATING TO LEINSTER

Mac Murchadha, chief king of Leinster; and O'Fiachrach, lord of Ui-Enechglais; and O'Cosgraigh, lord of Feara-Cuallann; and O'Riaan, lord of Ui-Drona; and O'Tuathail, lord of Ui-Muireadhaigh; and O hEochadha, over Ui-Faelain; and Mac Gormain, lord of Ui-Cairche; and O'Conchobhair and O'Duinn, and O'Brogarbhain, and O'Cionaoith, and O'Diomasaigh, and O h-Aenghusa, and O h-Aimergin, and O'Murchadhain, kings of Ui-Failghe; and O Ciardha, over Cairbre.

THE PART RELATING TO OSRAIGHE.

Mac Giolloaphatraic, and O'Cearbhaill, and O'Donnchadha, kings of Osraighe; O'Bruadair, and Mac Brain and O'Braonain, over the Three Truichas, i.e., the Clanns, and the Comar, and Ui-Eirc.



Let us proceed quickly into Leinster,
The broad land which is not poor in heroes;
Ever renowned is the career of the men,
The cemetery of the valorous Gaeidhil.

We shall enumerate in the east now
The hospitable chiefs of the province in one shower,
A scion with whom we shall meet no grudge,
We shall abide with Mac Murchadha.
363

King of Ui n-Enechlais364 in the east,
O'Fiachrach of the great land,
Through the slaughter of the strangers was detained,
O'Cosgraigh on the plain of Cualann.365

O'Riain, king of Ui Drona,366
Is more rapid than the great waves;
Over the Ui Muireadhaigh367 outside,
Not illegitimate are the O'Tuathails.

The Siol-Eochadha of high prosperity
Over the tribes of Ui-Faolain,
368
Mac Gormain with wealth hither
On the fair-surfaced land of Ui Bairche.369

Let us proceed westwards to Ui-Failghe,370
To whom the heroic oaks bend,
Of their rights I speak,
Their tribes I commemorate.

The O'Brogarbhains371 of townlands,
The Clann Chionaoith,372 the Clann Conchbhair,373
They spend their lands on knowledge,
The O'Duinns374 and the O'Diomasaighs.375

Of the chiefs of the fair-bright land,
Are the O'Aenghusas,
376 the O'Aimergins,377
Loud sounding their proclamations and their famous troops,
And the majestic Clann-Murchadhain.378

O'Ciardha over Cairbre379 of poets
Of the tribes of Nine-hostaged Niall;
There are but themselves over to the east,
Of the clanns of Niall in Leinster.

The land not taken by their steeds,
Let us advance into Osraighe,380
She has found with choice of every division,
The honor and nobility of Erin.

Three tribes are in its assembly,
The Clann Cearbhaill
381 to excite her;
Leopards within under their lords,
Are the Clann Donnchadha382 of protecting shields.

The third tribe heard in the east,
Mac Giollaphatraic
383 of the fine seat;
Noble fair-faced is the tribe
Of the residence of the head chieftain.

The Ui-Bruadair384 of the beautiful plain,
The Mac Braoins385 and O'Braonains,386
Not one sept of them has passed away,
These three tribes are of the Munstermen.387

The Clanns and the Comar,388
And Ui Eirc389 of gold-bestowing,
Good were their territories under the tribes;
Of the three cantreds we treat.


O'HUIDHRIN


LEINSTER


Addition of knowledge on sacred Erin,
The historian is not good who is not old,
390
A true history [is here] from me to the tribes,
The hosts of Boinn,391 of fair-cattle,

Those whom another author has omitted
Of the nobles of green-grassed Fodhla392
I shall sing: - the knowledge of every tribe
From the warm fort of each lord.

Of this country, which Conn393 divided,
O'Dubhagain,394 the bright-eyed, brown-haired,
Composed the history of men,
It is not unimportant to be mentioned.

It was not ignorance that caused him
Not to compose it from the first day;
Still, he left to me [to tell of the land] about the Daoil,395
He has neglected this race of Cathaoir.396

The Half of Conn of cheerful heart
He described from ancient books,397
He has shown all west and east,
Each man adhering to his patrimony.

Leath-Mogha,398 the part of Ebhir Finn,
The two southern thirds of Erin,
And the plain of Leinster to us belong,
And each brace man about the Luimneach.399

In these two provinces of the plain of the Gaoidhil,400
And the province of the race of Cathaoir,401
Of the hosts of the Sabhrann402 from sea to sea,
We shall detail to them their patrimonies.

Towards the south of fair Fodhla,
Let us pass from the fort of Dubhlinn,403
Westwards to Boirinn404 the ruggedly fenced,
Of white stone fields and active [men].

Let us give first place from the chiefs of the Gaoidhil
To the kings of the race of Cathaoir;
Let us mention separately in the eastern country
Each one of them over his patrimony.

Chief king of Nas, tree of the fort,
Lord of Leinster is Mac Murchadha;
405
He holds [the soveriegnty of] the province in his fair hand,
The charter of the lands is under the hero.

Lord of Ui-Failghe406 the land of cattle -
It is now unknown to poets;
O'Conchobhair407 is hero of the plain408
On the green round hill of Cruachan.409

The tribes of the territory of the extensive plain,
Let us treat of their sub-chiefs;410
What host is richer than they?
Over the people of Ui-Failghe of fair land.

Over Ui Riagain411 of heavy routs,
A vigorous tribe who conquer in battle,
Is O'Duinn, chief of demolition,
Hero of the golden battle-spears.

Another dynast who is known to me,
O'hAenghusa
412 on Clar-Colgan,
Fine his country. beyond [that of] the Fians of Fail,
Which abuts on the grass of Cruachan.

Over Tuath-da mhuighe413 of the fair fortress
Is O'Maoilchein of the rich heart;
Delightful is the smooth cantred of the plain,
Its border is like the land of promise.

The bright cantred of Geisill414 is possessed
By a chieftain of the border of Leinster,415
Whose march is rapid and strong,
He is named O'hAimirgin.416

Over Magh Aoife417 of the warm slopes
Is O'Murchain, as dynast of the cantred,
The hero of the green Fidh-gaibhle,418
Against the plunders what country is stronger?

The Clann-Maoilughra419 over every tribe,
Noble the degree of their race;
A smooth plain this sept has defended,
The land is hereditary to O'Diomosaigh.

Delightful the territory, long since it was heard,
The cantred of Leghe of bright slopes,
O'Ceallaigh of Leghe,
420 of the eastern bank,
Is sub-chief of the plain of dells and yews.

After Ui-Failghe of the ancient lands,
Let us approach Laoighis421 of Leinster,
Brown-haired heroes for whom showers fall,
We shall devote some time to their history.

The great territory of Laoighis of slender swords,
Laoighis Reata,
422 of it I speak,
Belongs of O'Mordha with bulwark of battle
Of the golden shield of one colour.

Under Dun Masc423 of smooth land,
O'Duibh424 is over Cinel-Criomthainn,
Lord of the territory which is under fruit,
Land of smoothest mast-fruit.

The old Tuath-Fiodhbhuidhe of fair land
Is a good lordship for a chief;
The Muintir Fiodhbhuidhe425 are its inheritors,
The yellow-haired host of hospitality.

Over Magh-Druchtain426 of fair fortress
Is O'Ceallaigh of the salmon-ful river,
Similar is the smooth surface of the plain
To the fruitful land of promise.427

Gailine428 of the pleasant streams,
To O'Ceallaigh is not unhereditary,
Mighty is the tribe at hunting
On the sunny land of Gailine,

Crioch O-mbuidhe429 of the fair sod,
Along the Bearbha430 of the bright pools,
To O'Caollaidhe431 the territory is fair,
A shepherd prepared to encounter enemies.

The territory of the Ui-Barrtha432 of the fine glebe,
Of the race of the melodious Daire Barrach;
O'Gormain433 received the lands,
Rapid was he in the battle meeting.

Pass across the Bearbha of the cattle borders,
From the land of corn and rich honey.
From Dinnrigh434 to Maistin435 the strong,
My journey is paid for by their nobility.

O'Tuathail of the fort of mede,
Is over the energetic Ui-Muireadhaigh
436
To Almhuin437 of the thrilling music,
Of the fair-topped fruitful grass.

Lord of the green grassy sod
Is the fair Mac Giolla Mocholmog,
438
Free men over men not weak,
Over the fair Feara-Cualann.439

Other kings obtained the land,
The mast-bearing territory of the plain of Cualann,
O'Cosgraigh of the flowing tresses,
Of the triumphant saffron-speckled tribe.

The plain of the Life440 of the black ships,
A great land of beautiful fruit,
West beyond Teamhair,441 of the house of Conn,
O'Gealbrain442 is the old tree of the fair land.

O'Taidhg443 found a land under fruit,
Ui-Mail,444 a land without eclipse;
O'Ceallaigh is over east Ui-Teigh,445
Which he purchased for his fair-haired tribe.

Over Cairbre of Leinster446 of the plains
Is O'Ciardha447 of the red-bladed swords;
The scion of Almhain448 without scarcity in the east,
By whom battles were kindled round Cruachan.449

The Fortuatha450 of Leinster of slopes,
Over Cairbre of the red-speared hosts,
The tribe from the Boinn451 of Colla and Conn,
Of them right is the division.

Over all Ui-Inechrais452
Is O'Fiachra453 chief of Amhain,454
O h-Aodha455 over Ui-Deaghaidh456 for me,
For whom the trees blossom after bending.

O'Muirte457 of great mirth
Is over the fair Cinel-Flaitheamhain,
Over Ui-Mealla of swift ships,
The hero O'Finntighearn458 has sway.

A lordship profitable, weighty,
Has O'Murchadha
459 of smooth fair land,
The territory of Ui-Felme,460 the hero has obtained,
In his turn of ancestral possession.

Ui-Felme461 the cold northern tract,
A fair land has O'Gairbhidh462 obtained,
Thye warriors of Tulach463 to cement the tribes,
All are without decay throughout the region.

Another high noble tribe,
The Siol Brain,464 people of the Dubhthoire,465
They have not got a portion of the plain of Corc,
The scions from the middle of the garden.

From the Bearbha to the Slaine456 eastwards
Is the extent of the territory of the Clann-Cosgraigh,
The host of Beanntraighe467 of curling locks,
The hawk-like, slow-eyed, warlike host.

Lord of the fine Fearann-deiscertach468
Which is not uneven to be mentioned,
To O'Duibhginn it is hereditary,
The host from the black pool of fair bushes.

Hero of Fothart of the carn,469
A stately, modest, polished youth:
A hero of good deeds with darts,
The affluent chief O'Lorcain.470

Crioch na-gCenel,471 fair the land,
Land of the sod of brown berries,
A harbour the fairest under the sun,
O'h-Artghoile472 is its hereditary chief.

Hereditary to O'Riaghain473 of smooth land
Is a canted, long theland,
Ui-Drona474 of pleasant hills,
More befitting [to him] than a strange territory.

O'Nuallain,475 hero without fault,
Chief prince, fine and bountiful of Fohtart;476
O'Neill of fair Magh da chon,477
Who has taken a step beyond the Gaels.

Siol-Elaigh,478 tribe of steeds,
For O'Gaoithin479 it is right he defend it;
Chief of the fine people who were not of foolish friendship,
O'Dulaing,480 hero of Lagan.

OSRAIGHE

Let us pass across the Bearbha,481 of old streams
After [having named] the heroes of Leinster,
To the tribe of the level land of my heart,
To the beautiful host of Osraighe.

To Mac Giollaphatraic482 of the Bregian fort,
The land of Osraighe is due,
From Bladhma483 out to the sea,484
Brave is his battle over the battles.

Sub-chiefs and mighty chiefs,
I mention under the hero of Liathdruim,485
From the Bearbha to the plain of Munster,486
To the king of Tara it belongs to unite them.

The high chief of the fruitful canted,
Of the delightful Coill Uachtorach
487
Is O'Dubhshlaine,488 hospitable the man,
From the mountain of most beauteous rivers.489

O'Cearbhaill490 for whom the trees are ruddy,
O'Donnchadha491 of honest aspect,
Whose rocklike hosts possess the fruitful land,
Are two kings of the same territory.

Near the Bearbha of the fruitful border,
The king of the district ye have heard,
Is is he who is elected over Magh Mail,
O'Donnchadha of fine Gabhran.
492

From Cill Chainnigh493 of the limestones
To Sliabh gCaithle494 of the fine sloping hill
Is the plain of O'Cearbhaill for whom the sea is smooth,495
Land of the green rich grassy carpet.

Ui Duach of Osraighe496 of the warm soil,
The fair wide plain of the Feoir,
Not easily passable is the wood of the plain,
Its protecting chief is O'Braonain.497

Mac Braoin498 of the firm land
Is over the Clanns I commemorate;
a fine district of fair acrons,
O'Broithe499 over free Magh Sedna.

In Magh Lacha500 of the warm hill slopes
Is O'Faolain501 of manly tribe;
Extensive is the district due to them,
Which the O'Faolains have filled.

Over Magh Airbh502 I now mention,
Is O'Caibhdeanaigh503 of the woody plain;
Head of every meeting is the steady chief
At the head of Coill O'hCathasaigh.504

O'Gloiairn,505 the fruit branch has got,
A cantred of a sweet country,
A smooth land along the beauteous Callann,506
A land without a particle of blemish.

Of Ui Bearchon507 of the yellow mantle,
King of the territory is O'Caollaidhe508
The plain of the tribe who return heavily,
Is the land over the bright-flowing Bearbha.509

King of Ui-Eirc510 of slender steeds
Is O'Bruadair,511 scion of the flood;
A sandy territory of heavy floods,
Like the champaign land of Maonmhagh.512

After having visited Osraighe of beauteous land,
After having compassed the Clanns of Cathaoir,
Let us pass (nor wonder at it) to the Siuir,513
Westward to the fair, rich Magh Feimhin.514

CASHELL

Our visit shall be to Caisel of the kings,
515
The seat of Corc,516 who practised no evil deeds:
The story of our adventure, when unfolded,
Will presage prosperity, luck, and success.

Let us mention henceforward every hero
On the plain of Caisel of firm ramparts,
A fruitful wooded country of the head fortress;
We are not ignorant of them.

Let us give the first place to its own territory,
To Caisel of the smooth clear plain,
Corca Athrach517 is its name,
Fine are its battalion and march over districts.

The dynast of the district that is here
Under Caisel of the territories of brown nuts,
Is a fresh bright gentle scion,
A wreath to the head of Caisel.

The chief princes of the great plain of Tal,518
Around Caisel of the fair territory,
I will not conceal that from any one,
A cause without a flaw or defect.

Chief king over all Erin
Was Brian
519 of the cow-tribute,
Over the territory of Caisel who will prevail,
A house [built] over the relics of Tailgenn.520

The chiefs of Munster of the fortress of Sionainn,
Descendants of Eoghan, son of Oilioll,
521
Mac Carthaigh522 is hero of their law,
Like a stormy, inexhautible sea.

Eoghanacht of Caisel523 of the plain of Cian,
O'Donnchadha is its hereditary chieftain;
It is also styled Feimhin,
Uniter of the tribe of yellow nuts.

Sliabh-ardachaidh524 of the fine land
Is hereditary to O'Deaghaidh525 as a patrimony;
Septs of the tribe of the head of the plain
Are O h-Oilella,526 O'Brachain527 the melodious.

Two fair kings, I no not conceal them,
Over the Deisi
528 I assert,
Are O'Bric,529 how has exceeded every tribe,
And the fair, wide O'Faelain.530

O'Mearadhaigh,531 the good king,
Chief of Ui Fathaidh,532 who obtained great land,
The O'Neills of Ui-Eochain Finn,533
All these lions I mention.

O'Flannagan obtained the land,
Uachtar-tire,
534 a land of brown berries,
A land of most lasting fruitful soil
Under a clothing of variegated green.

Ui Athele535 to the sea
Was obtained by hardihood of conflict,
By scions of smooth skin to fight the battle,
The O'Breslins south-east to the sea.

The O'Foghladhas536 it is meet for us
To mention, of the scions of rich hair;
O'Cein537 from the mede-abounding Machuin,538
They will exceed all tribes in fame.

The delightful land of Ui-Eachach,539
The south of the woody Inis Fail,540
O'Bric541 selects it across the flood,
From Lec Logha542 to Liathdruim.543

The lord of Feara-muighe544 of smooth mounds,
O'Dubhagain545 of Dun-Manann,546
Tribe of relations of prosperous wealth,
O'Caoimh,547 branch of Gleanomhain.648

King of Ui-Liathain,549 hero of renown,
Hardy divisions of the battalion of Munster,
The head of the O Anamchadhas550 is its rightful chief,
A host of thin-edged arms of best nobility.

A fine tribe strong in pursuit
Is over Ui Mac Caille
551 of the drinking;
Two tribes are in the smooth plain,
The Ui Breaghdhas,552 and the fine O'Glaisins.553

Ciarraighe Chuirche554 of the bright harbour,
To the race of Torna555a this land belongs,
O'Cuirre obtained the warm land,
Of a level like the plain of Meath.

Over Cinel-Aedha556 of the warm land
Is O'Ceallachain557 of the plain of Bearra,558
A land of green pools with white bottoms;
Land of widest harbours.

Cinel mBece559 of the land of cattle,
Around the Bandain560 of fair woods,
The most warlike man from the rapid Muaidh,561
Is O'Mathghamhna562 of the harbour of white foam.

To the race of Lughaidh563 near the sea,
Here I pass over the boundary;
It behoves me not to pass these people by,
But to detail the renown of the heroes.

O'h-Eidirsceoil,564 chief king of the land,
Of Corca Laighdhe565 I speak,
He assumed possession over the harbour of Clear,566
The most tranquil pillar of the kings.

The O'Floinns of Arda567 of green woods,
A tribe of illustrious genealogy;
Every man of their host is the material of a chief;
These are the Ui-Baghamhna.568

King of the vigorous Tricha medhonach569
Is O'Cobhthaigh570 of the white-stone harbour;
Land of Cliodhna,571 plain of O'Cobhthaigh,
Foe in battle to foreigners.

Muintir-Bhaire572 of the fair fort,
Of the race of warlike Fothadh;573
O'Baire574 is over this land of the sea;
Is the plain of Manainn575 fairer?

O'h-Eidirsceoil of Bearra,576 the good,
Over Bearra of the salmon-full border;
The harbour of Baoi,577 at which the branching sea is green,
Is under his extensive fleet of wine.

After treating of the race of Lughaigh,578
And the proper land of Desmond,
Let us leave entirely the land of Ith,579
Territories of yellow hazel nuts.

Clann tSealbhaigh580 of the bright steams,
A land of which there is no doubt;
O'Domhnaill and his strong hand
Divided the plain of brown nuts.

O'Donnchadha of Loch Lein,581
O'Donnchadha of the full, strong Flesc,582
Are thus over the Clann tSealbhaigh,
Men whose mind is on [the soverignty of] Munster.583

A fine land which we are not pass over
O'Ceithearnaigh, the smooth-skinned, obtained;
Ui-Floinn
584 of Lua, about their far extending Laoi,
Scions of fresh aspect, like their fathers.

O'Bece,585 scion of fair land,
Is over Beanntraighe586 of the fair summit,
A host to whom high deeds are truly easy,
Of the race of Fergus of Uladh.587

Ui-Eachach588 of the east of Banba,
Is the great patrimony of O'Mathghamhna,589
Land of fair mounds, irriguous, not undulating,
That plain of brown nuts is extensive.

Aos Ais-de590 of the flock-abounding plain
The hero O'Muircheartaigh has obtained,
A fine land with green aspect,
O'h-Imhasbhain591 has acquired.

After the tribes of the plain of the keels,
I speak of the race of Conaire,592
A tribe of the heroes of Breagh, from Tulach-an-Trir,593
In Munster, of the smooth flowing streams.

In the west, let us give first place to the host,
Of Corca Duibhne,594 of great bounty;
Let us speak of the east as far as the streamy Siuir,
Of every fresh plain of fine cattle.

Three sub-chiefs are hereditary to them,
The old land of Ui Duibhne of good hosts,
O'Seagha
595 and O'Failbhe the man,
Seal of reckoning the districts.

O'Conghaile596 of the slender swords,
Over the bushy-forted Magh O'gCoinchinn;597
A hazel tree of branching ringlets,
In the Munster plain of horse-hosts.

From the Maing westwards is hereditary to them;
O'Failbhe
598 is owner as far as Fionntraigh;
O'Seagha has obtained, without denial,
A country not wretched; he is king of Ui-Fathach.599

Of the race of Conaire the hero
Let us speak, of the chiefs of Muscraighe,600
A most whose seat is the fine land,
The land of Mairtine601 of Munster.

Muscraighe Mitine602 the great
O'Floinn obtained, just is his battle-host;
A valiant array who obtain sway,
O'Maolfabhaill is over it.

O hAodha,603 who bestowed cows, has got
The wide Muscraighe Luachra;604
A tribe of fine land and high renown,
About the salmon-full Abhainn mor.

The territory of O'Donnagain, certainly
Is the great Muscraighe of Three Plains,
605
With the host of the flock-abounding Iarann,606
Host of the sunnyland of vowed deeds.

Tuath-Saxan607 of the fair district,
I mention for O'h-Ionmhainen;
A beautiful territory of abundant crops,
A hardy section of the race of Conaire.608

Muscraighe Treithirne609 the mighty
Is hereditary to O'Cuirc, as a just man;
O'Maoilbloghain,610 important in the territory,
Has tilled the land of fine sods.

O'Carthaigh's611 just share,
Is Muscraighe612 of the west of Feimhin;
Fort of the chessmen, hitherto pleasant,
A saying not seldom said of it.

Over Muscraighe-tire613 the warm
Are two dynasts of best nobility;
O'Donghalaigh614 and O'Fuirg also,615
Of the fresh plains of the flowery smooth border.

Two cantreds, we remember,
The two flowery Corca-Baiscinns,616
Which are hereditary to the Muintir Domhnaill;617
A host who divide the territory.

Another sub-king of this land of flocks,
Sun-bright is his genealogy,
O'Baiscinn
618 tree over the Boinn,619
A tribe who traverse every hosting.

The chief of Ui-Bracain620 of satin cloaks,
Chieftain of heavy hosting,
O'Maolcorcra621 of fast fame,
Of the margin of the two inbhers.622

The two septs of all the Fochla,623
Of the brave race of Conaire,
About the horbour of th moist plain, no falsehood,
Hereditary to O'Ceallaigh624 to gaurd them.

Let us leave the race of Conaire of Cliach,625
Kings of Ernai626 of golden shields;
Let us turn our breast to the race of Fergus,627
It is a step due as a just debt.

King of Ciarraighe628 over the clans of Ciar,
O'Conchobhair,629 it is right for him so to be,
Chief of the mede-abounding land,
From the strand630 to the fair-streamed Sionainn.

O'Laoghain,631 hero of renown,
Over Ui-Feaba632 we have found;
O'Caithneannaigh633 obtained the land,
Hard under the battle-peaks of Cualann.634

Ui-Flanannain, extensive the land,
A great land of delightful streams,
O'Duibhduin
635 is over the warm land,
He is its king, and his attention is upon [improving] it.

All the Alltraighe636 return
Two kings of the plain of Ciarraighe,
A tribe which is ready in the point of difficulty,
O'Neidhe637 and the Clann-Conaire.638

To Muintir Diocholla is due
Corcumruadh
639 of the fiery battle hosts,
O'Maoileitigh of hospitable seat,
Who have not refused to contest their right.

The lands around fair Sliabh Eisi
In the sweet streamed Cinel-Sedna,
A tribe who have cemented their people;
Of their country is O'Draighnen.

The cantred of Feara Arda640 of gold,
Corcumruadh of the fiery battle hosts,
O'Conchobhair641 obtained the land,
The hills of beautiful Conach.642

O'Lochlainn,643 hero over battalions,
Is over the soft drop-scattering Borinn,644
Over Tealach Chuirc645 by right,
Of the cattle and wealth-abounding port.

Dal Meadhruaidh,646 hosts of Macha,
Nobler than the high chieftains,
Together with the race of musical Ciar,647
Are over the knightly host of embattled lions.

From the race of Tal648 turn we westwards649
To the province of the race of Maicniadh,
From the host who prevailed over Cruachan650
'Tis right to proceed to old Luachair.651

The plain of Luachair,652 land of produce,
Belongs to the beautiful O'Dunadhaigh,653
Tribes of hardy battle,
A fair-surfaced moist district.

O'Donnchadha654 of Loch Lein
King of Eochanacht is he,
O'Cearbhaill655 who is our friend,
Hawk of the sept of the white strand.

O'Caoimh656 of the just, brown brow,
Lord of Urluachair of fresh pasturage,
A man who united the warm country,
Which is constantly like the plain of Meath.

O'Ceallachain657 of the fair skin,
Of the race of Ceallachan of Caisel,
Men for whom a flood of fruit burst forth
Over the dark nut-bearing wood.

Far from the bounteous river Ella,658
To the west of Gleann Salchain659 of smooth rods,
is a fine land without concealment of fair nuts,
It is the land of the noble Mac Amhlaoibh.660

A patrimony of the plain of Corc,
Aes-Ealla of the famous level floor,
Belongs to this stately scion of Banba of curling hair,
To O'Tedgamhna
661 of Dun Durlais.662

Let us proceed across Luachair663 hither,
A journey which is fit for poets,
To the cold and festive Claonghlais
Of the green, irriguous, wooded land.

The Ui-Conaill664 of the battalion of Munster,
Multitudinous is the gathering
A great tribe, with whom it is not usual to contend,
Are the battle-trooped host of the O'Coilens.665

O'Billraidhe666 who used to bestow cows,
Over Ui-Conaill of the field of Gabhra,
King of truth of fair lands,
The smooth dells of heavy fruit.

Mac Innerigh,667 hero of gems,
Over the mellow Corca Muicheat,668
A fine host who constantly ramify
Like the white blossom of the branching apple tree.

Corca Oiche669 of beautiful wood,
A fair-surfaced territory of fresh inbhers,
A fair land of best showers,
Under the vigorous hero, O'Macasa.

O'Brearga of the fair mansion obtained
The cantred of Ui-Rossa
670 of rich course;
The hero of Caonraighe671 of fair land
is O'Maolcallann672 of branches.

The share of the noble Dal Cairbre Ebha,673
Of the kings of Caisel of white wattles,
Lasting is his profit of the land,
The brave pillar O'Cleirchin,.674

Hereditary to O'Donnabhain675 of Dun Cuirc676
Is this and, as a land of encampment;
To him, without tribute, belonged [the land] along the sluggish Maigh,677
And the plains down to the Sionainn.678

Eochanacht Aine679 of warm land,
O'Ciarmhaic680 is prop of the territory,
Territory of fairest root-lands,
Ui-Enda681 of Aine-Aulum.682

O'Suilleabhain,683 who loved not oppresion,
Over the great Eoghanacht of Munster;
Under Cnoc Rafonn he obtained the lands,
After gaining battles and conflicts.

O'Cuile, who defended fame,
Over the generous Eoghanacht Aradh;
684
Over the land of fair Aolmhagh685
O'Caollaighe is the brace hospitable man.

Green its baird, green its mounds,
Eoghanacht of Crich Cathbhuidh;
686
Delightful the land of the broad plain,
It is hereditary to the host of O'Duineachair.687

To O'Merghda belong as his share
The smooth Eoghanacht of Ross-arguid,
688
He is lord of every hill of fairy sprites
About the beauteous Carn Mughaine.689

The Siol-Maoilduin690 of Dun gCais
Is over the noble Eoghanacht Indais,
An armed people passing over the waves,
The flock-abounding people of Eachdruim.691

Eoghanacht of the sunny field of Gabhra,692
Land of sweetest, smooth-round apples,
The gem of each female band of fame,
To O'Cinnfhaeladh693 of red weapons [it belongs].

Aes-Greine694 of the fine bright land was obtained
By O'Conaing695 of the territory of Saingel,696
He possessed a cheery land around fair Grian,697
From his noble descent from Eoghan.

Let us speak of the race of Cormac Cas,698
Let us pass across the Sionainn of green waves,
From the sept of Corc, point out our way,
To the tribe of Lorc of the lamp.69

The Deis Beg700 of the purple cloak
Is hereditary to the valorous tribe,
The heroes of Claire701 mentioned by us,
Of the fairest bay of Erin.

Three septs of high hilarity
Are over the Deis Beag of trees,
Are over the smooth plain of the house of Tal,
The populous tribe of O'Luain.
702

The Ui-Duibhrosa703 of hot incursions,
The Ui-Faircheallaigh704 of the land of Claire,
True is the blood of the other tribe
By whom the tribe of the Mairtine705 were subdued.

The Dal gCais in the battalions of Claire
Have pure silver, and with it,
Gold purely smelted;
The pleasant host are not indigent.

Each lord fits in his own territory;
Of the Dal Cais, brace is the career;
Men of great prosperity, who are mentioned by us,
From Collan706 eastwards to the Sionainn.

We give first place without violence
To the high upper cantred;
707
To O'Deadhaigh708 the land is due,
At Teallach709 of the plains of brown nuts.

To O'Cuinn710 of the candid heart
Belongs the extensive Muintir-Ifearnain,711
The fruitful land of the fine youth
Lies around the festive Coradh-Finne.

Ui Flaithri,712 enough praising it,
A land close to Fionnchoradh
Is the land of O'Cathail713 west and east,
Smooth land is this land of yew.

Cinel Baith, of no small land,
The fine tribe of Brentir,
714
O'Maoilmeadha of the fair land,
His [are] the woods about the delightful Eidhneach.715

Of the race of Eoghan, of the region of Cliach,
The Ui Corbmaic
716 of beautiful green land;
To O'h Aichir belongs the warm land,
The plain of Meath is such another.

A dynast powerful in every house,
A noble sept of the Ui-Aichirs
Is over Ui Flannchadha
717 of hospitable seats,
The thin-edged, illustrious host.

O'Duibhginn718 of the ruddy countenance,
Over the fair Muintir Connlochtaigh,719
The chief gained its emolument
By the strength of battle spears.

O'Grada 720 took all
The bountiful Cinel Dunghaile,721
His yellow-hilted polished swords,
Weapons that slaughter meetings.

Royal dynast of fine incursions
Is Mac Conmara
722 of Magh-Adhair,723
The territories of wealth are his country;
Is over the Cantred of Ui-gCaisin.724

The host of the O'Dobharchons, pleasant company,
Are the Muintir-Lideadha
725 I mention,
These are the Clanns of Sinnell,
Ready are they with the nobles.

The land of the poetical Clann Dealbhaoith726
Is under O'Neill, chief of Fionnluaraigh;727
The host of Tradraighe come into his house,
Of lank yellow-flowing tresses.

The cantred of O'm-Bloid728 of satin banners,
Kings of Cliach of embattled tribes,
The tribe of Ui-Tail, to the clear green stream,
Is throughout the wide yewy plain.

Over the Ui-Cearnaigh,729 of noble career,
Are the O'Echthigherns, of Maicniadh's730 land,
A spirited territory is under the fine youth,
To the bright old stream of Sionainn.

The wood of Ui-Ronghaile731 of cleared land,
O'Seanchain of the bright eyes possessed
The land about all Eibhlinn,
Like the fine smooth plain of Maonmagh.

O'Cinneidigh, who reddens the javelin,
Over the wide smooth Gleann-Omra,
732
The race of our Donnchuan733 who, through valour,
Obtained the lands without dispute.

Muintir-Duibhraic734 of Dun-Braine,
Are chieftains of Tuath-O'gConghaile,735
Their forts are about the good Borumha;736
Locks [of hair] like gold are upon them.

The Ui Toirdhealbhaigh737 of the house of Tal,
Near unto Flannan's Cilldalua;738
Delightful its woods, generous its lands,
From that west to the Sionainn.

Tuath-Luimnigh739 about the noble Sionainn,
Two chiefs are over it on one side
O'Cadhla and O'Maille, the swift,
Beautiful ravens of the two inbhers.

Ui-Aimrit,740 land of hospitality,
Is hereditary to the sept of the O'Duibhidhirs;
Their acquisition is far over Cliach;
They are a branch in every ford.

O'Cedfadha, of the pure heart,
Is over the cantred of the Caladh;
741
The sept of Cluain, chosen by Tal,
The beautiful plain of O'Cedfadha.

Aos-tri-muighe,742 smoothest of plains,
Is the grassy territory of O'Conaing,
A bright watered plain, of noblest aspect,
by the meadowy side of Craobh Cumhraidhe.743

From the race of Cormac Cas, of the house of Tal,
We must henceforward depart;
To approach the Uaithnes744 is meet for us,
Noble their name and their defence.

Over Uaithne-tire,745 of fruit,
Is Mag Ceoch,746 who loved great projects;
Muintir Loinsigh,747 people of the lands,
In this wood at the breast of strangers.

Uaithne-Cliach,748 of bright green land,
Is the country of O'h-Ifearnain;749
Fine land at the side of each hillock,
Beautiful and loved by O'Cathalain.750

Chief king of Ara751 over every tribe,
O'Donnagain752 o0f the noble aspect;
The territory yielded heavy produce
For the king of Ara; it is not trifling.

A territory around Crota Clilach753 was acquired
By Mag-Longachain,754 a fair, gray hero;
Lord of a populous plain is here,
Ui Cuanach755 of the green soft land.

Of this same race, and this is right,
Are Muintir-Duibhidhir,
756 of white teeth,
Plain of Sechtmadh, of fair fences,
Is under the noble tribe in turn.

Lords to whom the nut-trees bend,
Are the Muintir-Cearbhaill
757 of Biorra's plain,758
King of Eile759 to sweet Bladhma,
The most hospitable mansion in Erin.

Eight cantreds, eight chieftains east,
Under the king of Eile, of the land of cattle;
Brace the host gathering a prey -
The host of yellow curling hair.

O'Flannagain, valiant his hand,
Over the whole of Cinel Farga,
760
Of the race of Tadhg, son of Cian of Crinna,761
From the exalted, hospitable Lec Oilella.762

The Clann Ruainne,763 of the flowery roads,
A sweet, clear, smooth-streamed territory,
Mag Corcrain is of this well-peopled territory,
Of the white-breasted brink of banquets.

O'h-Aedhagain764 of Crich-Cein765
Over the smooth-sodded Clann-Ionmainen,766
A cantred which strewed banquets on every land,
With honied dew upon each pod.

The great cantred of the rapid Clann-Maenaigh,767
That country is hereditary to O'Dubhlaighe;
The tribe are a fine tribe of leaders,
At the breast of the clear-streamed Bladhma.768

A chieftain for whom the trees yield fair nuts
Is over Clann Coinlegain,
769 of heavy fruit,
Scion of Biorra of the Elian race,
Mag Gillaphoil of the fair seat.

Hui Deci,770 the good hilly cantred,
The extensive fair-mansioned land,
A land of fruit, strengthened by them,
Is the patrimony of O'Banain.

Mightily have they filled the land,
The O'Meachairs
771 - the territory of Ui-Cairin,
A tribe at the foot of Bearnan-Eile;772
It is no shame to celebrate their triumph.

Tuatha Faralt773 of the smooth woods,
That is the patrimony of O'Ailche,
A plain of fair mansions, powerful their tribe,
Like the land of Tailltenn of dried-up rivers.

Corca-Thine,774 which serves nobly
Under Druim Sailech,775 of the green carpet,
O'Cathail776 beyond all it has placed [as chief]
To unite the yewy land.

The southern Eile,777 mild to the poets,
Of the race of the generous Eochaidh Baillderg;778
Populous its tribes, and its purple hazels,
The land which O'Fogarta779 has got.

Let us travel.

Three tribes whose lands are delightful;
Three tribes like the blossom of the apples;
Three branches without fault in their time,
Over Corca Aela,780 I mention.

Ui Dineartaigh is the country
Of O'Aimrit, the mainstay of the territory;
A household from which showers return,
The merry people of Midhasa.

Two other high tribes of it -
Noble are the two tribes;
A soldiery without concealment - fine the troop -
The swift Ui Cerc, the Ui Maoiluidhir.

The lord of Ui Lughdhach,781 of ancient swords,
Is O'Spealain782 of white spurs,
Majestic is the battle-march of the hero,
Increasing under the land of Macha.



FOOTNOTES:-

NOTES TO THE PART OF O'DUGAN'S POEM RELATING TO MEATH.

1. The Three septs of Tuilen.- The language is here defective, it should run thus: - "and the three septs of Tuilen, namely, the Ui-Maine, the Cinel-Eochain, and the Britons; O'Muirchertaigh is Lord of Ui-Maine, O'Modhairn over the Cinel-Eochain, and O'Domhnaill over the Britons."

2. Fodhla, one of the most ancient appellations of Ireland, being borrowed, according to Bardic historians, from a Tuatha De Danann queen of that name, who was living at the time of the Milesian or Scotic invasion. See Ogygia, part iii. e.xv. Dr. Lynch translates this line,

"O Socii, pulchrae fines obeamus lernes."

3. Let the nobles of Erin proceed.- Ireland was called Eire from a Tuatha De Danann queen, who was, according to the Bardic accounts, contemporary with Fodhla, mentioned in the preceding note, and the reigning queen when the sons of Milesius arrived from Spain to conquer the island. O'Dubhagain here imagines himself summoning a royal convention of the men of Erin to Teamhair or Tara, for the purpose of being described in his poem. His language is rather abrupt and obscure, but it may be thus paraphrased: "Let us proceed first of all to Tara; let the princes and chieftains meet us there that we may weave their names into our poem, and thus transmit them to the latest posterity. 'No man shall be without a patrimony,' i.e., every man's patrimony shall be declared and made known in our verses. And when they assemble there, face to face, they will each request of us to notice their families, and to celebrate their nobility."

4. Teamhair, now Tara. It was the palace of the monarchs of Ireland, from the earliest dawn of Irish history down to the reign of Diarmaid, son of Fergus Cearbheoil, when it was deserted. See Petrie's Antiquities of Tara Hill (Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy, vol. xviii., p. 108).

5. Has not melted away.- That is, which has not withered away. From this it is clear that O'Dubhagain believed many ancient Irish families to have dwindled into insignificance at the time he was writing. Many of them had revived in his time - since Bruce's invasion of 1315, - but they had been removed from their original territories.

6. O'Maeileachlainn, anglicised O'Melaghlin, and now corrupted to Mac Loughlin. This family, which was the head of the south Hy-Niall race, derived its name and lineage from Maelseachlainn, or Malachy II., monarch of Ireland, who died in the year 1022. The name Maelseachlainn signifies servant of Seachlann, or St. Secundinus, who was nephew of St. Patrick, and patron saint of this great family. The present head of this family is unknown. The late Con Mac Loughlin, of Dublin, was of the race, but his pedigree was never made out. His relatives are still extant, near Mullingar, in the county of Westmeath.

7. O h-Airt, now Hart. After the English invasion this family was banished from Tara, and settled in the barony of Carbury, in the county of Sligo.

8. O'Riagain, now O'Regan, and more frequently Regan, without the prefix O'. This race was banished from Tara at the English invasion, and is now found widely dispersed throughout Ireland.

9. O'Ceallaigh, or O'Kelly, now usually Kelly, without the prefix O'. This family was descended from Aedh Slaine, monarch of Ireland; its last representative was Congalach O'Kelly, lord of Bregia, who died A.D. 1292. The race was so dispersed and reduced in the seventeenth century, that they could not be distinguished from the O'Kellys of other territories and lineage. Connell Mageoghegan, chief of the sept of Lismoyny, who translated the Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1627, gives the following account of them under A.D. 778: "Dermott Mac Kervell, king of Ireland, had issue Hugh Slane, Colman More, and Colman Begg. To the race of Hugh was allotted Moy-Brey, extending from Dublin to Bealaghbrick, westerlie of Kells; and from the hill of Houthe to the mount of Sliew Fwayde, in Ulster. There reigned of king Hugh his race, as monarchs of this kingdom, nine kings, &c. There were many princes of Moy-Grey besides the said kings, who behaved themselves as becomed them; and because they were nearer the invasions [ i.e., the rallying point of the invaders] of the land than other septs, they were sooner banished and brought lower than others. The O'Kelly of Brey, was the chief of that race, though it hath many other of bye-septs, which for brevity's sake I omit to particularize. They are brought so low now-a-days that the best chroniclers in the kingdom are ignorant of their descents, though the O'Kellys are so common every where that it is unknown whether the dispersed parties in Ireland of them be of the families of O'Kellys of Connaught, or Brey, that scarcely one of the same family knoweth the name of his own great grandfather, and are turned to be meerre churles and poore labouring men, so as scarce there is a few parishes in the kingdom but hath some one or other of these Kellys, I mean of Brey," or Bregia.

10. O'Conghalaigh, now Conolly. A branch of this family remained in Meath and in the present county of Monaghan, where the head of the name became notorious in the year 1641.

11. Breagh, a large plain or level territory in East Meath, comprising five cantreds. According to an old poem, quoted by Keating, it extended northwards as far as the Casan, now the Annagassan stream, near Dundalk, in the county of Louth.

12. O'Ruaidhri.- This name (which is to be distinguished from Mac Ruaidhri, anglicised Mac Rory and Rogers,) is now unknown, as are the name and situation of the territory of Fionnfochla.

13. Crich na gCedach, i.e., the territory of the Cedachs, a sept descended from Oilioll Cedach, son of Cathaoir Mor, monarch of Ireland, in the second century. This territory was formerly in Meath, but is now included in the King's county. In the Black Book of the Exchequer of Ireland, and in several Pipe Rolls in the reign of Edward III., it appears that this territory, which in these records is called Crynagedagh, was charged with royal services as lying within the county of Meath. It comprised the present parish of Castlejordan, in the barony of Warrenstown, King's county, adjoining the counties of Meath and Westmeath. See Inquistion taken at Philipstown, 9th January, 1629, and Harris's Edition of Ware's Antiquities, chap. v.; Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1124, 1142, 1406, 1484. The O'Follamhains of this race are to be distinguished from the O'Fallamhains or O'Fallons of Clann Uadach, in the county of Roscommon, with which Colgan confounds it in his Acta SS., pp. 138, 142.

Dr. Reeves has supplied the editor with the following notices of the church of Crich na gCedach:-

Ecclesia de Kirnegedach, valet x. mar. per an." - Taxatio circ. 1300. "Rectoria de Grenegedah alias Kernekedah. Haec parochia ita denominatur a quodam Kedah O'Connor, qui olim erat dominus illius territorii. Unam tantum habet ecclesiam vocatim ecclesiam de Gortantemple. Ecclesia impropriata erat Priori S. Trinitatis de Ballybogan." - Bp. A. Dopping, Account of Meath Diocese (MS. Marsh's Library). See "Church of Crenegedgagh, Patent Rolls, Jac. I. p. 221b. Also Leinster Inquis., Com. Regis. No. 18, Jac I. (1623); Book of Rights, p. 200; Battle of Magh Rath, p. 243.

14. Laeghaire, otherwise Ui-Leaghaire. This territory comprised the region around the town of Trim, in the county of Meath. It embraced the greater part of the baronies of Upper and Lower Navan. O'Coindealbhain, its chief, was the lineal descent of Laeghaire, monarch of Ireland in St. Patrick's time. The name is now anglicised Kindellan, Quinlan, and sometimes Conlan. See Miscellany of the Irish Archaeological Society, p. 143; Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1171. The townland of Tullyard, in the barony of Upper Navan, and about two miles to the north-east of Trim, was in this territory, and contained the chief residence of O'Coindealbhain.

Dr. Reeves has communicated the following note:-

The Book of Armagh distinguishes between Laoghaire of Bregha and Laoghaire of Meath: "Vadum Truim [Ath-Trym, now Trim] in finibus Loiguiri Breg, Imgae in finibus Laoiguiri Midi," fol. 16 bb. See Vit. Tripart. S. Patricii, ii. 3, in Trias Thaum p. 129 b.

Castletown-Kindalen, or Vastina, is a parish in barony of Moycashel, Westmeath.

15. Luighne, now called in Irish Luibhne, and anglicised Lune, a barony in the west of the county of Meath. The O'Braoins [O'Breens] of this territory disappeared from history at an early period, the last mentioned in the annals of the Four Masters having died in the year 1201. They are to be distinguished from the O'Breens of Breaghmhaine in Westmeath.

16. Ui-Macuais of Breagh.- This sept was situated to the south-west of Tara, and occupied the barony of Moyfenrath in East Meath. The family name of O'h-Aenghusa is now anglicised Hennessy. All traditions of the ancient power of this family in Meath have long since died out.

17. Odhbha, a territory near Navan in East Meath, which appears to have comprised the present barouny of Skreen. The family of O'h-Aedha has been scattered widely over East Meath and Monaghan. The name is now usually anglicised Hughes. This sept is to be distinguished from O'Heas of Ui-Fiachrach of Ardsratha, in Ulster.

18. Cnodhbha, now anglicised Knowth. The territory so called appears to have been comprised in the barony of Upper Slane, in East Meath. The name is now applied to a very ancient mound in the parish of Monknewtown. The family name of O'Dubhain is now anglicised O'Duane, Dwan, Divan, and Downes.

19. O'h-Ainbheith, now anglicised Hanvey and Hanafy, without the prefix O'. Feara-Bile, now Farbill, is a barony in the county of Westmeath. See Annals of Four Masters, 1021, 1095. This family was dispossessed by Sir Hugh De Lacy. The poet takes a great leap here from Cnobhbha at the Boyne, to Farbill in Westmeath, merely for the sake of the rhyme.

20. Saithni.- This tribe descended from Glasradh, the second son of Cormac Gaileng, son of Tadhg, son of Cian, son of Oilioll Olum, who was king of Munster in the third century. They were a sub-section of the people called Cianachta Breagh, and were seated in Fingal, in the east of Bregia, to the north of the city of Dublin. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 69. The O'Cathasaigh, now Casey, of this territory, was dispossessed by Sir Hugh De Lacy, who sold his lands. See Hibernia Expugnata, lib. ii. c. 24, and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 187, note s. It appears from Alans Register that this territory was co-extensive with the barony of Balrothery West, in the county of Dublin. The O'Caseys of this race are to be distinguished from those of Liscannon, near Bruff, in the county of Limerick, of whom, strange to say, is Edmond Henry Casey, Esq., of Donahies, seated in a neighboring barony to this very territory. The Caseys of Saithni are, however, numerous in Meath, in Drogheda, and in the city of Dublin.

Dr. Reeves has contributed the following note on this family:- For the descent of O'Cathusaigh see M'Firbis, Geneal. MS. pp. 348, 353.

"Inter ipsa igitur operum suorun Ocathesi, et alias quamplures ad regiam mensam cum omni sollicitudine revocavit," i.e., Phil. Wigorniensis. Gir. Campbr. Hib. Expug. ii. 24 (p. 799, ed. Camd.). The extent of Ocathesi's country is ascertained from a composition between John Archbishop of Dublin, and Galfridus Prior of Lanthony (Registrum Alani, fol. 110a), concering the ecclesiastical rights of terra O'Kadesi, in which a partition is made, and the Archbishop grants to the Prior the churches of Villa Ogari [Garristown] cum capella de Palmerstown; de Sancto Nemore in Fincall [Holywood]; capella terre Regredi alias Riredi, scilicet Grathelach [the Brallagh]; Ecclesia Ville Stephani de Cruys or Nalle [the Naul].

While the Prior granted to the Archbishop the churches de Villa Macdun [Bally madun], de terra rogeri Waspaile [Westpalstown], de Villa Radulphi Paslewe [Balscaddan], and the chapel Ricardi de la Felde. Thus Ui Cathusaigh embraced Garrisotown, Palmerstown or Clonmethan, Holywood, the Grallagh, Naul, Ballymudan, Westpalstown, and Balscaddan, constituting the whole of Balrothery West, except Bally boghil, which had been otherwise disposed of. Therefore, we may say, Saithne, i.e., Ui Cathasaigh or Ocadesi = Balrothery West. This partition between the two ecclesiastics arose out of their joint right to the whole tithes of the territory; for King John, and after him Edward III., granted and confirmed to the Archbishop a "Medietas decimarum terrae Okadesi de Finagall," while the other "medietas" was reserved to the Priory of Lanthony, near Goulchester.

21. O'Leochain, now anglicised Loughan, and incorrectly translated "Duck." The name of Gaileanga Mora or Great Gaileanga, of which O'Leochain was chief, is still preserved in the barony of Mor-Gallion in the north of the county of Meath; but the ancient territory was more extensive than the barony, for we learn from a Gloss to the Feilire Aenghuis, at 13th of October, that the mountainous district of Sliabh Guaire [Slieve Gorey], now a part of the barony of Clankee, in the county of Cavan, originally belonged to Gaileanga.

22. Teallach-Modharain. - This tribe was seated in East Meath, probably in the barony of South Moyfenrath. The name of O'Donnchadha, is anglicised O'Donoghy or Dunphy, but the family who bear it are in obscurity. The O'Donnchadha, or O'Donoghoes of Kerry, are of a different race, and so are the Dunphys of Ossory.

23. Corca Raeidhe, now the barony of Corcaree, in the county of Westmeath. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1185, p. 66, note n. See the note on Korkureti of Adamnan, in Reeve's edition of the Vita S. Columbae, p. 89. The name O'hIonnradhain is now anglicised Henrion. This family is descended from Fiacha Raoidhe, grandson of Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar. See Ogygia, part iii. p. 69, and Mac Firbis, Genealogical MS., p. 106.

24. Feara-Ceall, i.e., Viri cellarum seu potius ecclesiarum. This name was long preserved in Fircal, a barony in the King's county, now known as Eglish; but there is ample evidence to prove that Feara-ceall comprised not only the modern barony of Eglish, but also the baronies of Ballycowan and Bally boy, in the same county. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 180. The present chief is unknown to the Editor. The head of the O'Maolmhuaidhs, anglice O'Molloys, in 1585, was Connell, son of Cahir, whose grandson was chief in 1677. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1585, p. 1838. Daniel Molloy, Esq., of Clonbela, near Birr, in the King's county, is traditionally considered the present senior representative of the family, but the Editor does not know his pedigree.

25. Feara-Tulach, i.e., Viri collium, now the barony of Fartullagh, in the south-east of the county of Westmeath. The family of O'Dubhlaidh, now Dooley, were driven from this territory by the Irish family of O'Melaghlin, before the English invasion of ireland, and they settled in Ely O'Carroll, in the present King's county, where they are at this day very numerous. See Annals of Four Masters, at the years 978, 1021, 1144, 1367. The English family of Tyrell obtained possession of Fartullagh soon after the ] English invasion.

26. Dealbhna-mor, i.e., the Great Delvin, now the barony of Delvin, in the east of the county of Westmeath. The Dealbhna were descended from Lughaidh Dealbhaedh, son of Cas, who was the ancestor of the Dal-Cais of Thomond. The descendants of this Lughaidh acquired seven territories contiguous to each other and beyond the limits of Thomond, in Meath and Connaught, viz., Dealbhna Mor, the territory here referred to, Dealbhna Beg, i.e., the small, Dealbhna Eathra, and Dealbhna Teannmaighe, in Meath; Dealbhna Nuadhat, between the rivers Suck and Shannon, Dealbhna Cuilefabhair, and Dealbhna Feadha, in Connaught. Sigdy, the great-grandson of this Lughaidh, had two sons, Treon, the ancestor of Mac Coghlan, chief of Dealbhna Eathra, and Lughaidh, the ancestor of O'Finnallain, now Fenelon. The last of this family who had possession of Dealbhna-mor was Ceallach O'Finnallain, who is mentioned in the Annals of the Four Masters at the year 1174. They were dispossessed soon after by Sir Hugh de Lacy, who granted their territory to Gilbert Nugent, ancestor of the Marquis of Westmeath, and the family have been for many centuries in obscurity and poverty. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 82, and Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1174, note w.

27. The Brugh. - This was Brugh na Boinne, on the river Boyne, near Stackallan. Dr. Lynch makes O'Maollughach of this place to be the same as the family called O'Mulledy in his time, but this is evidently an error.

28. Dealbhna Eathra. - This territory comprised the entire of the present barony of Garrycastle, in the King's county, except the parish of Lusmagh, which belonged to Sil-Anamchy. The family of Mag Cochlain retained their territory till they became extinct in the beginning of this century, when they were succeeded by the O'Dalys and Armstrongs, descended from female branches. The last chief of the name was locally called the Maw, that word being a diastole or lengthening of the prefix Mac. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1178, 1572, and 1601; and also De Burgo's Hibernia Dominicana, p. 305; Ogygia, part iii. c. 82.

29. Cuircne, now the barony of Kilkenney West, in the county of Westmeath; but the name of O'Tolairg is now unknown. Shortly after the English invasion this territory was wrested from the O'Tolairgs, and became the patrimonial inheritance of the Anglo-Norman family of Dillon, for whom the Irish bards attempted to make an Irish pedigree, which is given in all the modern peerages.

30. Cinel-Fiachach, usually anglicised Kenaliaghe in Anglo-Irish documents. The territory of the Cinel-Fiachach, Mageoghegan's country, originally extended from Birr, in the present King's county, to the hill of Uisnech, in Westmeath; but subsequently the family of O'Molloy, who were a junior branch of the Cinel-Fiachach, became independent of the Mac Eoghagains; and the original territory of the Cinel-Fiachach was divided into two parts, of which O'Molloy retained the southern portion, and Macgeoghegan the northern, which preserved the original name of the clan, and was considered co-extensive with the barony of Moycashel, in the county of Westmeath. In an old map made in the year 1567, published with the Third part of the State Papers, the situation of Mageoghegan's country is described as follows:-

"Mc Eochagan's country, called Kenaliaghe, containeth in length xii myles and in breadth 7 myles. It lyeth midway between the ffort of Faly (i.e., Philipstown) and Athlone, five myles distant from either of them, and also five myles distant from Mollingare, which lyeth northward of it. The said Mac Eoghagan's country is of the countie of Westmeth, situated in the upper end thereof bending towards the south part of the said county; and on the other side, southward of it, is O'Moloye's country. And on the south-east of it lyeth Offaley; and on the east side joineth Terrell's country, alias Ffertullagh. On the north side lyeth Dalton's country, and O'Melaghlin's country on the west side, between it and Athlone, where a corner of it joyneth with Dillon's country."

The late Sir Richard Nagle inherited the property of the last chieftain of this family, from whom he was maternally descended. Another branch of theis family, who latterly changed the name to O'Neill, was removed by Cromwell to the castle of Bunowen, in the west of the county of Galway, where they possessed a considerable tract of property, which was ' lately sold under the Incumbered Estate's Court. The name is now usually written Goeghegan without the Mac, and sometimes Gahagan and Gegan. Richard Mageoghegan, who defended the castle of Dunboy in 1602; Connell Mageoghegan, of Lismoyny, who translated the Annals of Clonmacnoise in 1627; and the Abbe Mageoghegan, who published his Histoire d'Irelande, at Paris, in 1758, were of this family. See the Covenant between the Fox and Mageoghegan, in the Miscellany of the Irish Archaeological Society, vol. i., p. 183.

31. Sept of Enda. - Cinel-Enda was a small territory near the hill of Uisnech, in Westmeath. Ogygia, part iii., c. 85. Mag Ruairc, the chief of this territory, was descended from Enna Finn, youngest son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, monarch of Ireland at the beginning of the fifth century. The name Mag Ruairc is now unknown. The various families now called Rourke, without the prefix of O or Mac, are believed to be of the O'Rourkes of Breffny, but some of them may be of this family of Kinel-Enda. See Miscellany of the Irish Archaeological Society, pp. 234, 287.

32. Tuath-Buadha. - The situation of this territory is now unknown. The family name, O'Cairbre, still exists, and is anglicised Carbery.

33. Cinel-Aenghusa. - The exact situation of this tribe is unknown. The name O'h-Eochadha is now anglicised Hoey and Hoy. In this form it is very common in East Meath.

34. Dealbhna Beg, i.e., Little Devlin. This is supposed to be the barony of Demi-Fore in East Meath. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 82. The surname O'Maolcallann is now anglicised Mulholland. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 183.

35. Teathbha. - The name of this territory is generally latinized Teffia, and anglicised Taffia, Teffa, and Teffa-land, by Connell Mageoghegan, in his translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise. In St. Patrick's time, Teffia was a large territory extending into the present counties of Westmeath and Longford, and divided by the river Eithne, now the Inny, into two parts, north and south; the former including the greater part of the present county of Longford, and the latter the western half of the county of Westmeath. Its chief lord, O'Cartharnaigh, descended from Maine, fourth son of Nial of the Nine Hostages, afterwards too the name of Sinnach or Fox, which is still retained. For many centuries, however, the county of the O'Caharneys of Foxes was confined to one small barony, namely, the district of Muinter-Tadhgain, which was formed into the barony of Kilcoursey, and placed in the King's county. See Patent Toll of Chancery, 42 Eliz., and Covenant between Mageoghegan and Fox, printed in the Miscellany of the Irish Archaeological Society, p. 185. Darcy Fox, Esq., of Foxville, in the county of Meath, is believed to be the head of this family. The Foxes of Foxhall in the county of Longfoed, are also of this family, and descend from Sir Patrick Fox, who, as appears from the State Papers, was Clerk to the Privy Council of Dublin from 1588 to 1610, and one of the Commissioners for Inquiring into Defective Titles in 1607. His son, Nathaniel Fox, is the ancestor of the family of Foxhall. See the Miscellany of the Irish Archaeological Soceity, &c., pp. 188, 189, and Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1207, note z, p. 156.

36. Mag Cuinn, more usually O'Cuinn, anglicised O'Quin. This family is to be distinuished from O'Quin of Muinter-Iffernan, in Thomond. The territory of Muintir-Gilgain was distributed among the baronies of Ardagh, Moydow, and Shrule, in the county of Longford. The townlands of which it consisted are specified in an inquisition taken at Ardagh on the 4th of April, in the tenth year of the reign of James I., which found that thirty-five small cartrons of Montergalgan then belonged to O'Ferrall Bane, and seventeen one-half cartons of like measure to O'Ferrall Boy's part of the county of Longford. The O'Quins, now Quins, of this territory, have been for many centuries living in poverty and obscurity in their native territory, and have lost all traditions of their former greatness.

37. O'Confiacla.- This name is now obsolete, and no anglicised form of it has been yet identified.

38. O'Lachtnain, now usually Loughnan; but some families have changed it to Loftus, while others have made it O'Loughlin and MacLoughlin. This family has been several centuries in obscurity.

39. O'Muireagan, now usually anglicsed Morgan. The family sunk into obscurity soon after the English invasion.

40. Well have they ordained the seasons, i.e., by their righteous governments. It ws the belief among the ancient Irish, that when righteous princes reigned, the seasons were genial and the fruits of the earth grew in great abundance. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 100, note c, and Transactions of the Gaelic Society of Dublin, vol. i., pp. 12,13.

41. Comar, i.e., the confluence. This was probably the territory around the Comar of Clonard, where the stream called the Blackwater falls into the river Boyne. The O'Flannagans of this territory, who were sometimes lords of all Teffia, are now unknown. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1034, 1153. They are to be distinguished from various other O'Flannagans seated in different parts of Ireland.

42. Breaghmhaine, now the barony of Brawney, in the west of the county of Westmeath. The O'Breens of this territory are still respectable, but they have latterly changed the anglicised form of the name to O'Brien.

43. Mac Conmeadha, now anglicised Mac Namee; but this family have been long dispersed. The situation of the territory of Muinter-Laedhacain is not determined.

44. Mag Aedha, now anglicised Magee. The exact situation of Muintir-Tlamain has not been ascertained.

45. Mac Taidhg, now usually anglicised Mac Teige, and changed by some to Montague. The exact situation of Muinter-Siorthachain remains to be found out.

46. Calraighe, anglicised Calry. This name is still retained and applied to a territory co-extensive with the parish of Ballymoughloe, in the barony of Clonlonan, county of Westmeath. Ballyloughloe ws for many centuries the chief set of Magawley, chief of Calry-an-chala. See Annals of Four Masters, p. 1095. The lands belonging to the different members of this family in the seventeenth century are described in an inquisition taken at Mullingar on the 14th of April, 1635, and in another taken on the 14th of May, in the 27th year of Charles II. The Editor examined this territory in the year 1837, and took notes of the following particulars, which are perhaps worth preserving:-

The lake from which Ballyloughloe derived its name, now nearly dried up. 2. Magawley's Castle, of which only one vault remains. 3. Dun-Egan Castle, a mere ruin, situated to the east of the village of Ballylong. 4. The site of a small abbey, near Magawley's Castle. 5. Ruins of a small chapel, near the modern church. 6. A conspicuous green moat of great antiquity. 7. The castle of Carn. 8. The castle of Creeve. 9. The castle of Cloghmareschall. 10. The castle of Moydrum.

The Magawleys of this district are to be distinguished from the MacAwleys of Fermanagh, and also from those of the county of Cork, who are of a totally different race and even name from those of Calry. The late Count Magawley of Frankford, in the King's county, was the lst chief of this family that lived in Ireland.

47. Muinter-Maoilsionna.- O'Flaherty places this tribe in the territory of Curicnia, now the barony of Kilkenny West. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 85. Their ancestor was called Maeltsinna, i.e., chief of the Shannon, from the situation of his territory near the river Shannon. The name Mac Carrghamhna is now usually anglicised Mac Carron or Mac Carroon. Connell Mageoghegan, renders it Mac Carhon, in is translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1182, note k.

48. Corca-Adhamh, sometimes called Corca Adain. This territory adjoined the barony of Corcaree in the county of Westmeath, and is included in the present barony of Magheradernon. The name O'Dalaigh is now anglicised O'Daly, but more generally Daly. The familyis of the race of Maine, son of Nial of the Nine Hostages. Shortly after the English invasion this family, who followed the poetic or bardic profession, became dispersed, and were seated in several parts of Ireland. See Tribes of Ireland, pp. 1 to 15. Mr. Owen Daly, of Mornington, in the barony of Corkaree, was believed to be the senior of the O'Dalys of Westmeath. Of this family was the famous poet, Donough Mor O'Daly of Finnyara, in the barony of Burren and county of Clare. His descendants removed to Hy Many, in the latter part of the fifteenth century, where the acquired considerable property after the Revoltuion of 1688. Even before that period, the head of this branch of Hy-Many, Denis Daly of Carrownekelly, Esq., in the county of Galway, was second Justice of the Court of Common Pleans, and a Privy Councillor in the reign of James II. "He continued," says Lodge, "to fill this station at the Revolution with such impartiallity and integrity (in thos arduous times) as added lustre to his judicial character." The representative of this gentleman at the latter end of the last century was the Right Hon. Denis Daly, for many years member of parliament for the county of Galway, and in the Irish parliament, distinguished for his eloquence and ability, and characterized by Grattan as "one of the best and brightest characters Ireland ever produced. His eldest son, James, after having also represented the county of Galway for many years in parliament was raised to the Peerage of Ireland, June 6th, 1845, by the title of Baron Dunsandle and Clanconall. Of this family also was the Denis Bowes Daly, Esq., who succeeded, as one of the joint heirs of the lasthead of the Mac Coghlans. He was one of the most polished, refined and elegant ' gentlemen that ever came of the Irish race; was once in receipt of an income of 20,000 per annum, but died a pauper in the early part of the present century.

49. Muinter-Tlamin.- The surname of O'Muireadhaigh, of which there were several families of different races in Ireland, is now always anglicised Murray, without the prefixed O'.

50. Western Dealbhna, otherwise called Dealbhna Teanmaighe. The situation of this territory has not been fixed. After the English invasion, the family of O'Scolaighe, now Scully, were driven into the county of Tipperary, where they became herenachs of the Church lands of Lorrha, in Lower Ormond. This is one of the families of Dalcassian descent, which has risen to its ancient wealth and position. No line of pedigree of any branch of this family has een presered in the Dalcassian books.

51. Ui Mac-Uais, a tribe of the race of Colla Uais, monarch of Ireland in the fourth century, now the barony of Moygoish, in the county of Westmeath. The name of O'Comraidhe is still extant, but for many centuries reduced to obscurity and poverty. In the sixteenth century, it was anglicised Cowry. It is now more usually Corry and Curry, but this form is to be distinguished from O'Corra of Ulster, as well as from O'Comhraidhe of Thomond, and O'Comhraidhe of Corca-Lagihe, in the south of the county of Cork, which are all usually anglicised Curry.

52. O'h-Aedha. - This name still exists in Meath, but is always anglicised Hughes; Aedh and Hugh being generally considered the same name. The bounds of Eastern Tir-Teathfa cannot now be ascertained.

53. O'Cearbhail, now O'Carroll. This family cannot now be distinguished from the O'Carrolls of Ely, in the King's county, or form the O'Carrolls of Oriel. Their history is unknown; they sank into obscurity at an early period.

54. O'Duinn. - This family is also totally unknown for centuries. It cannot be distinguished from the O'Duinns or Dunns, of Iregan.

55. Southern Breagh. - The family of MacGillaseachlainn, which is to be distinguished from the more royal family of O'Maelseachlainn is now, and has been for centuries, totally unknown. They sank into obscurity and poverty shortly after the English invasion. They are mentioned by the Four Masters, A.D. 1121, 1160, and 1171.

56. Cairbre Gabhrain. - Cairbre Gabhra ws the ancient name of the barony of Grandard, in the north of the county of Longford. See Four Masters, A.D. 1405, note s. O'Ronain of this territory is now unknown. See the Miscellany of the Archaeological Society, vol, i. pp. 145, 146.

57. Lesser Gailenga of Breagh.- This territory was in Bregia, and north of the river Liffey. The church of Glas Naidhin, now Glasnevin, was in it. The name O'h-Aenghusa is now anglicised Hennessy. See Four Masters, at the years 825, 937, 1003, 1145. This family sank into obscurity at an early period, and is now unknown.

58. Fine Gall, i.e., the district of the Galls, or foreigners, now Fingal, a territory comprising that portion of the county of Dublin, lying to the north of the River Liffey. The family of MacGillamocholmog, so famous in the history of Leinster, and particularly in that of Dublin, where they got complete mastery of the Danes, was of the same race as the O'Brynes and O'Tooles of Leinster. They descended from Dunchadh, the brother of Faelan, who was ancestor of the O'Brynes of Leinster. The progenitor from whom they derived their hereditary surname was Gillamocholmog, son of Dunchadh, son of Lorcan, son of Faelan, son of Murcadhach, son of Bran, son of Faelan, son of Dunchadh, (a quo the tribe of the Ui Dunchahda,) son of Murchadh, son of Bran Mut. This family was originally seated in that part of the county of Dublin through which the River Dothair or Dodder flows, but after they got mastery of the Danes of Dublin their sway extended over the Danish territory of Fingal. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1044, and Gilbert's History of Dublin, vol., i., p. 403-408.

59. O'Dunchadha. - This was the tribe name of the family of MacGillamocholmog, as mentioned in the foregoing note. Here O'Dugan, who had no local knowledge of the district of Fingal, has converted the tribe name of Ui Dunchadha into a separate family name; but there never was any such hereditary surname in this territory. Dr. Reeves has communitcated the following note on the district of Ui Dunchadha. In it were situated the following churches:- Cill Cele Christ (Irish Clendar, March 3); Cill Mochritoc, on the banks of the Dodder, i.e, Achadh Finnich (May 11); Cill-na-manach, now Killnamanagh, in the parish of Tallaght (Dec. 31). MacGillamocholmog's land extended southwards to Glen Umerim (or Glanunder, now Ballyman), on the confines of the counties of Dublin and Wicklow. For a notice of the family of MacGillamocholmog, see History of the City of Dublin, by J.T. Gilbert, vol. i. pp. 230, 403.

60. Tuilen, now Dulane, an old church and parish near the town of Kells, in the county of Meath. The west end of the present remains of Dulane church is exceedinly ancient, and remarkable for its doorway, constructed of huge unhewn stones surmounted by an enormous lintel. The three septs here mentioned, and called the Congregation of Cairnech, are now totally unknown. St. Cairnech, who is still remembered as the partron saint of Tuilen, was not a native of Ireland, but of Cornwall; and Colgan supposes him to be the same as St. Cernach or Carantach, whose day in the Calendar of the British Church is the 16th of May, and who flourished about a century before the other St. Cairnech, having been, as is said, a cotemporary of St. Patrick. See Colgan's Trais Thaum., p. 231, and Acta Sanctorum, p. 783. St. Cairncech's day, in the Irish Calendar, is the 16th of May, as it is in the British Calendar. His life, in Latin, which makes frequent and very curious mention of his connexion with Ireland, is preserved in the British Museum (MS. Cotton, Vesp. A. 14, fol. 90), whence it has been printed in the Acta Sanctor., Maii, tom. ii. p. 585; and, with an English translation in Rees' Lies of the Cambro-British Saints, pp. 97, 396. See Rev. Rice Rees' Essay on the Welsh Saints, pp. 209-211; and also Dr. Todd's edition of the Historia Britonum, p. cxi. The following extracts from his Life will explain the title of St. Cairnech to the place he holds in the Irish Calendar:-

Deinde perrexit ad Hibernian insulam, Patricio antecedente....
"Perrexit Carantocus ad dexteram partem. Patricius autem ad sinistram,
et dixerunt ut convenirent una vice in ann.
"Et exaltate sunt ecclesie, et civitates sub nomine ejus in regione Legen (Laigen).
"Beati Cernachi opera leguntur in Hibernia, per totam patriam. sicut
leguntur in Roma beati Petri apostoli prodigia.
"S. Carantocus deduxit regiones Hibernensium invitos cetibus majorum,
cum regibus honoratus.
"Et ille solus perrexit ad Hiberniam insulam, et supultus est 17 Kl.
Junii (May 16), in civitate sua praeclara, et optima prae omnibus civitatibus
suis, quae vocatur Civitas Chernach."

The only family of the three septs of Tuilen now remaining is O'Muirchertaigh, which is probably the name now anglicised Murtagh, and is very common in the counties of Meath and Monaghan.

61. Ulaidh is here used to denote the province of Ulster, though for many centuries before the English invasion Uladh was applied to that part of the province of Ulster situated to the east of Glen Riche and of the Lower Bann and Loch Neagh, now represented by the counties of Down and Antrim, a territory into which the ancient Ulla were driven by the three Collas, in A.D. 333.

62. Tailltin, now Teltown, in the county of Meath, nearly midway between the towns of Kells and Navan, celebrated in ancient Irish history for its fairs and public games.

63. Breaghmhagh- This is a transposed form of the name Magh Breagh, a famous plain in East Meath.

NOTES TO THE PART OF O'DUGANS POEM RELATING TO ULSTER

Cenel Eoghain

64. Oileach, now Greenan-Ely, near Loughh Swilly, in the barony of Inishowen, county of Donegal. It was one of the ancient seats of the kings of Ulster. See the ruins of this fort described in the Ordnance Memoir of the parish of Templemore.

65. Race of Eoghan, i.e, the descendants of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, monarch of Ireland, who died A.D. 406.

66. Royal O'Neill - The O'Neills were the most powerful family in Ulster in O'Dugan's time; but at the period of the english invasion, and for a century of two later, the MacLachlainns were more powerful. A branch of this latter family removed with the O''Donnells to the county of Mayo, about the year 1679, where they still hold the rank of gentlemen.

67. Two tribes of the sovereignty - Muircheartach MacLachlainn, who founded the abbey of Newry about the year 1160, was one of the last monarchs of Ireland, cum renitentia, after the assumption of the Irish monarchy by Brian Borumha. None of the O'Neill family have been kings of Ireland since his time. See Dublin Penny Jouurnal, vol. i., p. 102.

68. Ten sons of Eoghan - See MacFirbis's Genealogies of the Cinel Eoghain.

69. Cianachta, now the barony of Keenaght, in the county of Londonderry. This territory belonged to the O'Conors, of Gleann Geimhin, who were of the race of Cian, son of Oilioll Olum, King of Munster, in the third century; but they were dispossessed by the O'Cathains or O'Kanes, of the race of Eoghan, a short time previous to the English invasion.

70. O'Conchobhair, now anglicised O'Conor. There are families of this name and race still living in the barony of Keenaght. The late Rev. Hugh O'Conor, P.P. of Culdaff, in Inishowen, and Hugh O'Conor, of Belfast, were of this family.

71. O'Duibhdhiorma, now anglicised Diarmid, and sometimes changed to MacDermott. The name still exists in the county of Donegal.

72. Bredach, a territory comprising about the eastern half of the barony of Inishowen, in the county of kdonegal. The name is till preserved in that of a glen, and small river which flows into Lough foyle. "Bredach est fluviolus peninsulae de Inis Eoghain, qui in sinum de Loch Febhuil apud Maghbile exoneratur." - Trais Thaum, p. 145, 185. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1122. The family of O'Duibhdhiorma disappered from history about A.D. 1454.

73. Tulach Og, ie., Collis juvenum, now Tullaghoge, s samll village in the parish of Desertereat, barony of Dungannon, and county of Tryone. This is the place where the O'Neill was inaugurated. In the year 1602, the Lord Deputy Mountjoy remained here for five days, and 'brake down the chair wherein the O'Neills were wont to be cvreated, being of stone planted in the open field. See Fynes Moryson, Rebellion of Hugh Earl of Tryone, book iii.c. 1; and Dublin Penny Journal, vol. i., p. 208.

74. Oh-Ogain, now O'Hagan. The site of the ancient residence of O'Hagan is to be seen on a gentle eminence a short distance to the east of the village of Tullaghoge. It is a large circular fort, surrounded by deep trenches and earthen works.

75. Another O'Hogan - this family is unknown. there are some families of this name in the counties of Tyrone and Londonderry, supposed to be different from the O'Hagans, but their history is forgotten.

76. O'Gairmleadhaighs, now O'Gormleys. This family has remained in obscurity since the Plantation of Ulster in 1609. They were originally seated in the present barony of Raphoe, county of Donegal, but being driven from thence at an early6 period by the O'Donnells, they established themselves at the east side of the River Foyle, where they retained a considerable trritory till 1609. On an old map of Ulster, preserved in the State Paper Office, london, O'Gormley's country is shown as extending from near Derry to Strabane.

77. Race of Moen - Cinel-Moen. This was the ribe name of the O'Gormleys, and became also that of their country, according to the Irish custom.

78. O'Domhnallains, anglicised O'Donnellan. This family sank into obscurity at an early period, and cannot now be identified.

79. O'Donnagains, now Donegan, without the prefix O'. This name is still extant, but obscure. It is to be distinguished from various other families who bore the same name.

80. MacMurchadha, now MacMorrow and MacMurray, and some have changed it to Morell. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1172.

81. MacDunnchuain, unknown at present.

82. MacRuaidhri, now anglicised MacRory, and sometimes translated Rogers, by which the origin of the race is disguised. A branch of this family became herenachs of the parish of Ballynascreen, in the barony of Loughinsholin, county of Londonderry, in the old church of which there is a curious monument to the family, with an epitaph and armorial bearings.

83. Teallach Ainbhith. - Exact situation not yet determined.

84. Muinter-Birn.-This is still the name of a district in the county of Tyrone, adjoining the barony of Trough, in the county of Monaghan, and the name is preserved in that of a Presbyterian parish. See annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1172, note o.

85. Cinel-Eachach, made Corca Each in the prose version. The race of Eochaidh, son of Eoghan, were seated in the present barony of Loughinsholin, county Londonderry, where the Muinter Cheallaigh, or O'Kellys, are still numerous; one branch of them resided in the valley of Glenconkeyne.

86. O'Ciarian, now anglicised Kerrins. The name Fearamaighe signifies 'men of the plain,' but their situation is now unknown. The Siol Tighearnaigh, or Tierneys, are now unknown.

87. Magh Iotha, i.e, the plain of Ith, now the Lagan, a beautiful tract in the barony of Raphoe, containing the church of Donaghmore. See Colgan's Trias Thaum, pp. 144, 181; and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 124. The families of O'Maoilbreasail and O'Baoighill, of the race of Eoghan, are now unknown in this territory, and must have sunk into obscurity at an early period, as the Irish annalists have preserved no notice of them. The O'Baoighills or O'Boyles, of the race of Conall, are a different family, and are still well known.

88. O'Cuinns, now Quins, very numerous in Tryone.

89. O'Cionaiths, now Kennys.

90. Cinel Binnigh.-These were the race of Eochaidh Binnech, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. These three tribes of Cinel Binnigh were situated in the ancient Tryone, on the east of the River Foyle, but the exact situations have not as yet been ascertained. See Annals of the Four Masters, at the years 1030, 1053, 1068, 1075, 1076, 1078, 1081, 1181. The O'Donnells of the race of Eoghan are now unknown, and seem to have disappeared from history before the English invasion.

91. O'Duibhduanna, now unknown.

92. O'h-Aghmaill, now anglicised Hamill, still a common name in Tryone.

93. O'h-Eitigein, now anglicised Magettigen by a commutation of the O' for Mac, which is not uncommon. The positions of these three tribes cannot now be laid down on the map of Cinel-Eoghain.

94. O'Maolfothartaigh, unknown.

95. O'Heodhusa, now Hosey or Husssey, but generally metamorphosed to Oswell, in the county of Fermanagh. This family afterwards became bardic, and migrated to Fermanagh, where they were poets to the Maguires.

96. O'Hogains, now Hogans; but they cannot be distinguished from other families of the same name in Tryone.

97. Carriac Brachaidhe, now Carrickabraghy, a territory which comprised the north-western portion of the barony of Inishowen, county Donegal. The name is still applied to a castle situated at the north-west side of the peninsula of Doach. The family of O'Maoilfabhaill, now anglicised Mulfaal, and sometimes MacPaul, are still numerous, but the other two families are unknown.

98. Extended to the wave, i.e, from Lough Swilly to Lough Foyle.

99. Eanach.-Situtaion unknown: but somewhere in the barony of Strabane, county of Tryone.

100. O'Murchadhas, now Murphys. There are families of this name of various stocks in different parts of Ireland, but they cannot now be distinguished. Don Patricio O'Murphy, the steward of the Duke of Wellington's estate in Spain, is the only man living who retains the O' in this name.

101. O'Mellains, now Mellans and Millans. This family were, for a time, the keepers of the bell of St. Patrick called Clog-an-edachta. They were seated in the parish of Donaghmore, in the territory of Imchlair, near Dungannon, county of Tyrone. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1356, 1425. Also Tripart. Life of St. Patrick, part ii. c. 142.

102. Cinel Feradhaigh.- This territory comprised the barony of Clogher, in the county of Tryone, and was the patrimonial inheritance of the family of MacCathmhaoil (MacCawell), descendants of Fergal, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan. The MacCawells are famous in Irish history for their learning, and the many dignitaries they supplied to the church, but are now very much reduced, and many of the sept seek to conceal their antiquity by anglicising their name Caulfied! It is usually latinized Cavellus, and some of the clan still retain the form MacCawell; but the greater number of them make it either Camphill, Cambell, Caulfield, or Howell. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1185. A distinguished branch of this family, who changed the name to Caulfield, settled in the county of Wicklow, where they still retain considerable property: their pedigree is well known. The family O'Fiachra and the other septs of this territory are unknown, or disguised under some anglicised forms. The other septs of Cinel-Fearadhaigh cannot now be distinguished.

OIRGHIALLA

103. Oirghialla.- This great sept was descended from the three Collas, who conquered the ancient Ultonians, and wrested from them that portion of the province of Ulster lying westwards of Glenn Righe, Lough Neagh, and the Lower Bann. The country of this sept originally comprised the greater part of Ulster, but for many centuries it was confined to the present counties of Lough, Armagh and Monaghan. The descendants of Eoghan, son of the monarch Niall of the Nine Hostages, deprived them of the present counties of Londonderry and Tryone shortly after the introduction of Christianity.

104. And their hostages.- This is a kind of pun to obtain a rhyme. The Oirghialla are said to have been so called because their hostages were detained in golden fetters.

105. O'Cearbhaill.- This fmaily is still rather numerous in the county of Monaghan; but they now write the name Carroll without the prefix O'. They disappear from history about the year 1193, when they were supplanted by other families of the same race, the MacMahons and Maguires.

106. O'Duibhdara.- This family also disappeared from history at an early period, and the name is now either totally unknown, or disguised under some anglicised form which is not identifiable. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1076, 1097, 1118, 1128.

107. MacMathghamhna, now MacMahon. Spenser fables that this family was of English descent, being, according to him, a branch of the English family of Fitz-Ursula; but Dr. Keating, in the preface to his History of Ireland, and O'Flaherty (Obybia, III., c. 76,77), have shown that they are of ancient Irish descent, namely, of the race of Colla da Chrich, son of Eochaidh Daimhlen, son of Cairbre Liffechar, son of Cormac MacAirt. Mr. Shirley, in his accounyt of the dominion of Farney, pp. 147-150, has given the true pedigree of this family.

108. Mag Uidhir, now anglicised Maguire. This family supplied the chiefs to Fermanach from about the year 1264, when they supplanted the older chieftains, and continued in power, till the reign of James I. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1264 and 1302.

109. O'Lairgnen, now anglicised Largan.

110. O'Flaithri, now anglicised Flattery. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1071, 1147, 1166.

111. Ui-Tuirtre.- These people were seated to the west of Lough Neagh, in the present county of Tryone, in St. Patrick's time; but for many centuries previous to the English invasion they occupied a portion of the present county of Antrim, and, according to Colgan, gave name to a deanery in the diocese of Connor, containing among others the parishes of Racavan, Ramoan, and Donnagorr, and the old churches of Downkelly and Kilgad, as also the island of Inistoide, in Loughbeg, near Toome Bridge. Trias Thaum., p. 183; Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 2276, note z; and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 124, note n. The exact limits of the district are given in Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 82, 292-297.

112. O'Flainn, now made O'Lyn by aspirating the F; but by some it is very incorrectly changed to Lindsay. The pedigree of this famous family, who were the senior branch of the Orighialla or Clann Colla is traced to Colla Uais, Monarch of Ireland in about the middle of the fourth century.

113. O'Domhnallain, now Donnellan without the O'. One of this family was lord of all Ui-Tuirtre in 1015, but they are now little known. See Annals of Four Masters, 1014, 1015.

114. Ui-Fiachrach Finn, otherwise called the Ui-Fiachrach of Ardsratha. They were seated along the river Derg, in the north-west of the county of Tryone, and their territory comprised the parish of Ardstraw and some adjoining parishes now belonging to the diocese of Derry. Ussher states (Primordia, p. 857) that the church of Ardstraw, and many other churches of Opheathrach, were taken from the diocese of Clogher, and incorporated with that of Derry. This tribe of the Ui-Fiachrach is to be distinguished from that of Connaught. They were descended from Fiachra, son of Erc, the eldest son of Colla Uais, Monarch of Ireland in the fourth century. See O'Flaherty's Obybia, part iii., c. 76; and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 121, note i. The name of O'h-Eirc is now correctly enough made Ercke, but without the prefix O'.

115. O'Criodain, now Cregan, without the prefix O'. The level territory of this family still retains its ancient name, being now called Magheracregan. It is situated to the south of the River Derg, in Tryone, in the territory anciently called Ui-Fiachrach of Ardstraw.

116. O'hAedha, now always anglicised Hughes, without the prefixed O'. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1044, 1069. This name is very common in Ulster.

117. Fearnmaighe, now Farney, a barony in the county of Monaghan.

118. O'Caomhain, now anglicised Keevan, without the prefix O'.

119. Magh Leamhna was the name of a level district in Tryone, afterwards called the Closach. See Colgan's Trias Thaum., pp. 149, 184. It is shown on an old map of Ulster preserved in the State Paper Office, London, as "the countrie of Cormocke mac Barone," and the river Blackwater is marked as flowing through it, the fort of Augher and the village of Ballygawley as situate within it, the town of Clogher on its western, and the church of Errigal-Keeroge on its northern boundary.

120. O'Mochoidhen, called by the Four Masters O'Machaidhen. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 997, 1053, 1062, 1110. The name is now unknown. This family sunk into obscurity at an early period.

121. Mughdhorna, more usually called Crich Mughdorn, and latinized Provincia Mugdornoram and Regio Mugdornorum. See Annas of Four Masters, A.D. 1457. The Mugdorni were the descendants of Mugdorn Dubh, son of Colla Meann.

122. Oirthcara, also called Crich nan-Airthear, and translated by Probus, in the second life of St. Patrick published by Colgan, "Regio Orientalium." The people were called Oirtheara, or Orientales, because they were seated in the east of the country of Oirghialla. The name is still preservced in the two baronies of Orior, in the east of the county of Armagh.

123. O'hIr, now usually anglicised O'Hare and O'Hayer, and sometimes Hare, without the prefix O'.

124. O hAnluain, now O'Hanlon, and sometimes Hanlon, without the O'. This family is very numerous in the baronies of Orior.

125. O'Cosgraigh, now usually anglicised Cosgrave and Cosgrove.

126. Feara Rois, i.e., the Men of Ross. The territory of this tribe comprised the parishes of Carrickmacross and Clonany, in the county of Monaghan, and parts of the adjoining counties of Meath and Louth, but its exact limits have not been yet determined. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 322; and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 154.

127. Ui-Meith-Macha.- This sept descended from Muireadhach Meith (the fat), son of Imchadh, who was the son of Colla da Chrich. They were seated in the parishes of Tullycorbet, Kilmore, and Tehallon, in the barony and county of Monaghan. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 149, and Colgan's Trias Thaum., pp. 151 and 184, note 16.

128. O'hInnreachtaigh, now Hanratty, without the O', a family now very numerous in the county of Monaghan.

129. MacDomhnaill, now MacDonell. This family still remains in the east of Fermanagh, and is to be distinguished from the MacDonnells of Scotland.

130. Clann Ceallaigh, i.e., race of Ceallach, now Clankelly, a barony in the east of the county of Fermanagh. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1441, 1466, 1484, 1499, 1501.

131. O'Baoigheallain, now anglicised Boylan, without the prefix O'. The family is still numerous.

132. Dartraighe, now the barony of Dartry, in the west of the county of Monaghan. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 153, note i.

133. Ui-Laeghaire of Loch Lir.- Loch Lir was one of the ancient names of Carlingford lough, between the counties of Down and Louth, but there must have been another lake of the same name: this tribe would appear to have been seated in the county of Tryone, to the east of the barony of Lurg, in the county of Fermanagh. O'Taichligh is now anglicised Tully and Tilly, without the O'.

134. Muintir Maoilduin, i.e., the family of O'Maoilduin, now Muldoon and Meldon, without the O'. Lurg is a barony in the north of the county of Fermanagh, where this family is still numerous.

135. Clann Fearghaile, i.e., the race of Fergal. Situation not determined.

136. Tuathratha, i.e., the district of the fort, a well-known tract comprised in the barony of Magheraboy, in the county of Fermanagh, and now usually anglicised Tooraah. The family of O'Flannagain are still numerous in this distrcit, but reduced to the level of cottiers and farmers. See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, in voce Flannagan.

137. Muinter-Pheodachain, a well-known district in the county of Fermanagh, extending from the mouth of the Arney river to the western extremity of the Belmore mountains. The MacGillafinnens are still numerous in this territory, but they are disguised at present under the anglicised form of Leonard. Though this family is set down among the Orighialla, they were of the Kinel Connell, and descended from the same stock as the O'Muldorrys. See Battle of magh Rath, p. 335.

138. Ui Conghaile.- This sept was seated in the barony of Knockninny, county Fermanagh. These two last-mentioned septs were dispossessed in the fifteenth century by two branches of the maguires called the Clann-Awley and the Clann-Caffrey.

139. Muintir Maoilruanaidh, i.e., the family of O'Maoilruanaidh, now Mulrony. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1057, 1189.

140. Ui h-Eignigh. This is probably the name anglicised Heeney. This family, as well as the O'Mulronys, sunk under the Maguires in the thirteenth century, and are now reduced to obscurity and poverty. Cornelius Heeney, of New York, who had acquired vast wealth, died in 1847, unmarried.

141. Slopes of Monach, i.e., the mountains and undulating hills of Fermanagh.

142. Triucha Ched of Cladach, i.e., the Cantred of Claddach, now the barony of Trough, forming the northern part of the county of Monaghan. The name MacCionaith is now anglicised McKenna, and the family are very numerous in this barony and in the city of Dublin. This family is not of the race of the Oirghialla, any more than MacGillafinnen of Fermanagh, but of the Southern Hy-Niall, of Meath.

143. O'Corbmaic, now Cormic.- This sept was seated in the barony of Tirkeeran, in the west of the county of Londonderry, whence they were driven by the O'Kanes and other families of the race of Eoghan, son of the monarch Niall of the Nine Hostages, who gradually displaced the Oirgialla.

144. Ui-Breasail of Macha.- This sept, more usually called Clann-Breasail, were seated in the present barony of Oneilland East, in the county of Armagh. For many centuries the MacCanns, who are of the race of Rochadh, son of Colla-da-chrich, were the chiefs of Clann-Breasail, having dispossessed the O'Garveys at an early period. This territory is shown on an old map of Ulster preserved in the State-paper Office, London.

145. O'Longain, now anglicised Langan and Long, without the prefix O'.

146. O'Duibheamhna, now Devany and Devenny.

147. O'Conchobhairs, now Connors.

148. Ui-Lorcain, now Larkin. The boundary line between these two septs cannot now be drawn.

149. O'h-Eighnighs, now O'Heaneys.

150. Ui-Eathach, i.e., descendants of Eochaidh. These were not the people of Iveagh, in the county of Down, but a sept of the Orighialla, descended from Eochaidh, son of Fiachra Casan, son of Colla da Chrich, who were seated in the district of Tuath-Eathach, which comprised the present barony of Armagh. This district is shown on the old map of Ulster just rferred to as Tuaghie, and as the county of Owen mac Hugh mic Neale mic Art O'Neill. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1498. The Clann Ruadhagain, or O'Rogans, of this district are still extant, but the Clann-Cearnaigh and O'Domhnaills or O'Donnells, are unknown and perhaps extinct.

151. Clann-Daimhin, i.e., the family of O'Daimhin, now Devin and Devine, without the prefix O'. A family of this name is mentioned in the Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1427, as chief of Tikennedy, in Fermanagh.

152. Ui-Maoilcraoibhe.- A family of this name occupied the west side of Knockbreda, near Belfast, in the county of Down; but it is highly probable that this was not their original situation, but that they were driven from a more westerly position on the increasing power of the race of Eoghan. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1490; Stuart's Armagh, p. 630; and Reeves's Down and Connor, p. 348.

153. Little Modharn.- This territory formed the northern portion of Meath, where it adjoins the county Monaghan. It was otherwise called Mughdhorn Breagh, as being a part of the plain of Magh-Breagh. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 807, 836, 867, 880.

154. Ui-Seaain, recte Ui Seghain, a people situated to the north of Ardbraccan, in the county of Meath. See the Tripart. Life of St. Patrick, part iii., x. xiv., Trias Thaum, p. 152. O'hAinbheth is now anglicised Hanvey and Hanafey, without the O'.

155. Mag-Uidhir.- Now Maguire. He was head chieftain of Feara Monach, now Fermanagh, in O'Dugan's time, as already remarked, but not before the fourteenth century.

156. Ui MacCarthainn, now the barony of Tirkeeran, in the county of Londonderry. The family of O'Conaill of this district is now made Connell, without the O'; and the family of O'Colgan is written MacColgan, by a substitution of Mac for O'. This latter family, on being dispossessed by the dominant race of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, became herenachs of the churchlands of Donaghmore, in Inishowen, where, at the foot of Slieve Snaght, the celebrated John Colgan, author of the Acta Sanctorum Hiberniae, was born.

157. Very great chieftains.- These two families would appear to have sunk very low in our author's time; for, notwithstanding these high terms applied to them, they are not even once mentioned in the Irish annals as invading territories, fighting battles, founding churches, or doing any thing that indicated possessions, power, or dignity. Strange that he should mention them in such unqualified terms, while he does nto even name the distinguished family of O'Brolchain.

CREABH RUADH

158. Craebh Ruadh, i.e., the Red Branch. This was the name of an ancient fortress of the race of Rudhraighe; and the ancient Ulta continued to be called from this place by the Irish poets for ages after they had been driven from it by the Oirghialla.

159. Kings of Ulaidh, i.e., the chieftains of that portion of the ancient province of Uladh or Ulster, which remained in the possession of the Clana Rury, or ancient Ultonians. Their country comprised only that part of the province lying east of Glenree, Lough Neagh, and the Lower Bann.

160. O'Duinnsleibhe, otherwise called MacDuinnsleibhe, and now anglicised Donlevy, without either prefix. This family lost its ancient rank shortly after the English invasion, and a branch of them removed to Tirconnell, where they became physicians to O'Donnell. Some of them passed into Scotland, where they made the name Dunlief and Dunlap, and others have changed it to Livingston. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1149, 1178, 1227, 1395, 1586.

161. O'h-Eochadha.- This family was of the same race as O'Duinnsleibhe, and also lost its ancient dignity about the same time. It is now anglicised Haughey, Haugh, and Hoey, without the O'. See Annals of Four Masters, 1114, 1164, 1172, 1194.

162. O'h-Aidiths.- These are mentioned in the Annals of Four Masters at the years 980, 965, 1005, 1046, 1065, 1094, 1119, 1136, as lords of Ui-Eathach Uladh, now Iveagh, in the county of Down, but no later notice of them is to be found. The name would be anglicised Hatty or Hetty, but it is probably extinct. See Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 351, 367.

163. O'h-Eochagain.- The only notice of this family contained in the Annals of Four Masters occurs at A.D. 1281, when a member of it was killed in the battle of Desertcreaght, in Tryone. The name is now anglicised O'Haughian; and a family of this name, who came from the county of Down, is living in Ballymena.

164. O'Labhradhas.- This name is now anglicised Lavery, without the O'. See note on Magh Rath infra.

165. O'Leathlabhras, now Lawlors or Lalors.- This family is mentioned in the Annals of Four Masters, at the years 904, 912, 930, as kings of Dalaradia and Ulidia, but no later notices of them occur. Whether they are the same Lawlers that appear to have been seated at an early period at Dysart Enos, in Laoighis, in the Queen's County, and to be also of this race, has not yet been determined. See Reeve's Down and Connor, p. 343.

166. O'Loingsighs.- Many members of this family appear in the Irish annals as kings of Dalaradia, but the last notice of them occurs at the year 1159. the name is now anglicised Linchy and Lynch.

167. O'Mornas.- This family, who were of Connaught origin, afterwards took the name of MacGillamuire, now Gilmore. They are seated in the territory of Ui-Ercachein, in the county of Down. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1391; and Reeve's Down and Connor, &c., pp. 339, 368.

168. O'Mathghamhna, usually anglicised O'Mahony, but there is no such name in Ulidia at present, so that we may conclude it to be the name usually written Moghan, Mahon, or Mahan. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1108, 1113, 1114, 1124, 1127, 1149. No later notices of them occur in Irish history. For their descent see Reeves's Down and Connor, p. 362.

169. Ui Eathach Cobha.- This sept gave name to the baronies of Iveagh, in the county of Down. For their descent and ancient history, see Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 348, 349, 359.

170. O'Coinne, now Kenny and Quin. See Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 79, 367.

171. O'Gairbhiths, now Garveys.- For a curious account of this family, see O'Brien's Irish Dictionary. The townland of Aughnagon, in the parish of Clonallon, near Newry, in the county of Down, was part of their ancient patrimony, and remained in their possession till about fifty years since. See Reeve's Down and Connor, p. 367.

172. O'hAinbhith, now Hanvey and Hannifey. No notice of this family occurs in the Anals of the Four Masters, which contain several entries concerning the O'Hannifeys of Oirgialla.

173. Mag-Aenghusa, now anglicised Magennis. The exact situation of the territory of Clan Aedha has not been yet determined. In the course of the twelfth century they rose into power, and became the chief lords of all the country of Iveagh. See Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 348-352.

174. Cinel Faghartaigh, now Kinelarty, a barony in the county of Down, of which the MacArtans were the hereditary lords. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, p. 371. Harris's History of the County of Down, p. 74; Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1130, 1375, 1493; and Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 213, 214, 215.

175. Mag Duibheamhna, now Devany. Dr. Reeves conjectures that Cinel Amhalghadha (Kinel-Awley), the tribe-name of this family, may have given name to the parish of Magherally, anciently Magherawly. See Reeve's Down and Connor, p. 368.

176. O'Morna.- See note 174, supra. This family came originally from Connaught.

177. Mag Duilechains of Clann Breasail.- In Dubourdieu's Statistical Account of the County of Antrim, p. 627, this territory is described from an old MS. as follows: "Clanbreasel Mac Collechan [i.e., Clann Breasail meg Dhuilechain,] (so called for a difference betwixt it and one other country of the same name in the county of Armagh); is a very fast country of wood and bog, inhabited with [by] a sept called the O'Kellies, a very savage and barbarous people, and given altogether to spoils and robberies."

178. O'Coltarain of Dal Cuirb.- Dr. Reeves conjectures that the parish of Ballyculter, at Strangford, in the county of Down, derived its name from this family. It seems to be now extinct, as it is not the same as the family of Coulter, which is of English origin.

179. Leath Chuinn, i.e., Conn's Half, i.e., a name for the northern half of Ireland.

180. Brughaidh, a farmer, whokep a house of general entertainment.

181. Eamhain.- Our author speaks here as if the Clanna Rory whom he enumerates were still the possessors of the palace of Eamhain and Craebh Ruadh, situated two miles west of Armagh; but his oetic licence is too violent, as they had been driven from thence by the Oighialla about the middle of the fourth century. It is curious to remark that he takes no notice of any district in the present county of Armagh as in the possession of the Clanna Rury: that territory was, in his time and for some centuries earlier, in the possession of the Oirghialla.

182. Peaky Boirche, now the Mourne mountains in the south of the county of Down. See Tighernach An., 611; Annals of Four Masters, pp. 735, 1495; and Reeve's Down and Connor, p. 369.

183. Cuailgne, now Cooley, a mountainous district in the north of the county of Louth, very famous in Irish history. It was originally a part of Uladh, though now in the province of Leinster.

184. Magh Rath, now Moira, in the county of Down. In the Book of Lecan, fol. 96b, it is stated that the church of Lann Ronan Finn is situated in Corca Ruisen in Magh Rath; and itis now determined that St. Ronan Finn's church is the present Magheralin, in the county of Down. See the Feilire Aenguis at 21st of May; see also Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 313, 367; his Admanan, p. 201; Battle of Magh Rath, p. 277.

185. O'Labhradha, now Lavery, a numerous clan in the parish of Moira. From these lines it would appear the O'Dugan considered the present parish of Moira as the site of the great battle fought here, A.D. 637. In the early part of the seveneenth century, Tirlagh Oge O'Lawry held several townlands in the present parish of Moira and in the adjacent part of Magheralin. See Reeve's Down and Connor, p. 369. This fact, coupled with the contiguity of the church of St. Ronan Finn, who cursed Suibhne Geilt, renders it highly probable that the plain around the present village of Moira was the scene of the great battle. The late Mr. John Rogan, a local antiquary, wrote a letter to the Editor in 1842, detailing the local traditions remaining of this battle, but his letter arrived too late to be made use of in the introductory remarks to the Battle of Magh Rath, printed for the Irish Archaeological Society in 1842. The probability is that the fort of Dun Adhmainn was situated in Tir OmBreasail, in the south-west of the barony of Orior; and that the idiot Cuanna set out from thence to Newry, and thence to Moira, for he is referred to as advancing from the south-west. See Battle of Magh Rath, pp. 276, 277. The whole of Mr. Hanna's argument (in his paper on Magh Rath, in the Ulster Journal of Archaeology) to prove that the present Moira is not the scene of the great battle, rests on the situation of Clann Breasail, which being on the south side of Lough Neagh, lies due west of Moira, but he overlooks the fact that O'Dugan connects the Magh Rath of the fierce contention with O'Lavery, and that the parish of Moira is still considered the country of the Laverys.

186. Dun da-leathghlas.- This was one of the ancient names of Downpatrick. See Reeve's Down and Connor, pp. 41, 139, 143, 224, 228, 361, 369.

187. The clay covered Columb.- It was generally believed at Down, and throughout Ireland, that St. Patrick, St. Bridget, and St. Columbkille were buried in one tomb at Downpatrick; but this seems a fabrication of the twelfth century, for though part of their relics may have been deposited there long after their deaths, there is no evidence that their bodies were ever deposited there in one tomb. See Reeve's Admanan, pp. 312, 313, 314, 315. It is very clear, from the life of St. Bridget, by Cogitosus, that her body was preserved at Kildare. See Colgan's Trias Thaum., pp. 523, 524. The body of St. Patrick may have been buried there immediately after his death, but even this is very doubtful. The finding of the relics of the Irish Trias Thaumaturga at Down, in 1185, was an invention got up by Sir John De Courcy and his clergy in that year, for the purpose of exalting the character of Down, then recently conquered by the English. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 526 and 1293, note f.

188. Cumber.- It is difficult to known what place is here referred to: whether Comber, near Loch Cuan; or Magh-Comair, that is, Muckamore, in the county of Antrim.

189. Eoghanachs, i.e, the race of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, who possessed themselves of a large portion of the ancient province of Ulster, and who, in O'Dugan's time, were the most powerful race there.

190. Ard-Macha, now Armagh, the chief ecclesiastical city of Ireland. The Archbishop of Armagh ranked in dignity with the monarch of all Ireland.

191. Their knowledge there.- This alludes to the great school of Armagh, in which, during the middle ages, many distinguished foreigners received their education.

CENEL CONAILL

192. Cinel-Conaill, i.e., the race of Conall, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. They were seated in Tirconnell, which in latter ages was coextensive with the present county of Donegal.

193. Rugged is the land, alluding to the extensive mountains in the north and west of their territory.

194. The cataract of Aedh, i.e., the waterfall of Eas Aedha, i.e., the cataract of Red Hugh, now the salmon-leap at Ballyshannon, in the county of Donegal. See Annals of Four Masters (Ed., J. O'D.), A.M. 4518, and A.D. 1184 and 1194.

195. The O'Maoildoridhs, if they were living. This shows that the O'Muldorys and O'Canannans, who were the chieftains of Tir-Connell preceding the O'Donnells, were either extinct or powerless in O'Dugan's time. At present there is not a single family of either name in the county of Donegal. For their pedigrees, so far as traceable, see Battle of Magh Rath, p. 335.

196. The Clann Daly.- This was the tribe name of the O'Donnells, who were the head chiefs of Tir-Connell in O'Dugan's time. For their pedigree see Battle of Magh Rath, p. 336-337, and Annals of four Masters, Appendix, pp. 2377 to 2420. They derived their tribe name of Clann Dalaigh from Dalach, chief lord of Tir-Connell, who died in the year 868, from whyose grandson, Domhnall, the O'Donnells have derived their hereditary surname. The original territory of this family was situated between the River Dobhar, or Gweeedore, and Swilly. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 157.

197. Clann Chinnfhaelaidh, a district in the north-west of the county of Donegal, comprising the parishes of Raymunterdony and Tullaghobegly. See Note to Annals of Four Masters, A.M. 3330, p. 18.

198. Tir-Ainmirech, now the barony of Boylagh, in the west of the county of Donegal. See Annals of four Masters, A.D. 1343, p. 582, note f.

199. Tir Baghaine, i.e., the territory of Enna Baghaine, the second son of Conal Gulban, now the barony of Banagh, in the west of the county of Donegal. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 156, note p. It extended from the River Eany, at Inver harbour, to the Dobhar, now the Gweedore river.

200. O'Baoighill, now O'Boyle, a family remarkable for their ruddy complexions, still very numerous in the west of the county of Donegal.

201. Magh-Seiridh, a plain in the north of the barony of Tirhugh. The family of O'Maoilmaghna is now anglicised Mullany.

202. Eas Ruaidh, i.e, the Tricha ched of Eas Ruaidh, or of the Salmon Leap, at Ballyshannon. This is described in a poem preserved in the Book of Fenagh, fol. 47, as extyending from the River Erne to the River Eidhueach, now the Edny. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 158. The name O'h-Aedha is now anglicised Hughes, but this sept is to be distinguished from several others of the same name in Ulster.

203. O'Taircheirt.- This name is now uknown in the county of Donegal. The O'Taircherts are mentioned in the Annals of Four Masters at the years 1113, 1197, and 1212, as chiefs of Clann Snedhghile, now Clanelly, a territory in the barony of Raphoe, situated to the west of the town of Letterkenny. The pedigree of this family is not preserved in the Irish genealogical books.

204. Clann Neachtain, another name for the Clann Snedhghaile. The pedigree of this sept is not preserved by the O'Clerys or Duald MacFirbis.

205. MacDubhain, now anglicised MacGuane.

206. Cinel-Enna, i.e., the race of Enna or Enda, the sixth son of Conall Gulban. The territory of this sept, ususally called Tir-Enda, comprised thrity quarters of lands, and is situated in the barony of Raphoe, and county of Donegal, to the south of Inishowen, and between the arms of Lough Foyle and Lough Swilly. See Battle of Magh Rath, p. 156, and Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1175.

207. Gleann-Binnigh, a valley in the parish of Kilteevoge, situated to the west of Stranorlar, in the county of Donegal. The name MacLoingseachain is now anglicised Lynch, without the prefix Mac.

208. Fanaid.- This territory is still well known by this name, and forms the north-east part of the barony fo Kilmacrenan; it extends from Lough Swilly to Mulroy lough, and from the sea southwards to Rathmelton. See Annals of Four Masters, A.d. 1186, p. 70, note 8. O'breslen was driven from this territory, and the family of MacSweeny Fanaid settled therein.

209. Ard-Miodhair.- The limits of this territory have not been yet determined. In the year 1199, O'Dochartaigh, now O'dogherty or Doherty, was chief of the territory of Cinel-Enda and Ard-Miodhair. Ard-Miodhair extended westwards of Cinel-Enda, in the direction of Glenfinn, in the parish of Kilteevoge. On the increasing power and population of the descendants of Conall Gulban, O'doherty, a very high family of that race, became lord of Inishowen, and expelled or subdued the famllies of the race of Eoghan, who had been lords of that territory before him. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1199.

210. Gillatsamhais.-This name is now either unknown or lurks under some anglicised form. The most analogical anglicised form of it would be MacIltavish.

211. Ros Guill, now Rossgull, a well-known promontory in the parish of Mevagh, barony of Kilmacrenan, and county of Donegal, lying between Mulroy lough and Sheephaven.

212. Ros-Iorguill.- Exact limits not yet determined. It adjoined Ros Guill on the west.

213. Fionn-Ros.- This was the original name of the district now called 'the Rosses,' situated in the barony of Boylagh, and county of Donegal. O'Furadhrain is now made Farran or Forran.

214. Tuath Bladhach, now Tuath, anglicised Doe, a well-known district in the north of the barony of Kilmacrenan, situate between the quarters of Cloghineely and Sheephaven. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1515, p. 1332.

215. O'Carnachain, now made Kernaghan, without the O'.

216. O'Dalachain, now obsolete.

217. Tir MacCarthainn, i.e., the territory of the race of Caerthann, son of Fergus, son of conall Gulban. The Abbe MacGeoghegan places this district to thee ast of Boylagh, but the present editor does not know on what authority. The pedigree of this race is lost. neither MacFirbis nor Peregrine O'Clery was able to supply the chasm in the Books of Lecan and Ballymote. See Battle of Magh rath, p. 156.

218. Siol Maolagain, now anglicised Mulligan, and by some Molineaux, without the O'. the family would appear to have its power in O'Dugan's time.

219. Tir Breasial, ie., Bresal's land or territory. The situation of this territory has not been determined; and the pedigrees of O'Donnagain and MacGaibhidh have not been preserved, or at least not yet discovered.

220. O Maoilgaoithe, now anglicised Mulgeehy and Wynne. this family was originally seated in the parish of Clondavaddock, in the territory of Fanaid, whence they were driven by the MacSweenys. Some families of this name are still extant. The late Dr. Thomas Wynne, of Croydon, near London, to whom there is a monument in the church of St. Margaret, was of this race, as the editor was informed by that gentleman's brother.

221. Clann Fearghaile.- Situation and pedigree unknown, in consequence of the chasm in the Book fo Lecan already referred to. The MacTighernains of this race are to be distinguished from those of Breie and Sligo.

The territories and tribes of Tirconnell can never be properly illustrated until the chasm in the Book of Lecan is supplied.

NOTES TO THE PORTION RELATING TO CONNACHT.

222. Macha, i.e., Armagh, here put for Ulster, by a violent figure of speech.

223. The Drobhaois, a river which flows out of Lough Melvin, and, taking a W.N.W. course, falls into the Bay of Donegal. See Colgan's Trais Thaum., p. 180, note 154; Harris's Ware, vol. i., p. 18; and Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1420, p. 843.

224. The plain of Cruachan, i.e., the plain of Magh Naoi, or Machaire Chonnacht, in the county of Roscommon, in which Cruachan, the ancient palace of the kings of Connaught, was situated. It lies between the towns of Roscommon and Elphin, and Castlereagh and Strokestown.

225. Clann-Conchobhair, i.e., the Clan-Conor, i.e., the family of the O'Conors of Connaught, who derive their name and descent from Conchobhar, king of Connaught, who died in the year 971 [972].

226. Cill-ard, i.e., high church, now unknown. There is only one Killard in all Ireland, namely, that in the S.W. of the county Clare.

227. Tuaim Dreccoin, i.e., Drecon's mound or tumulous, now Toomregan, on the frontiers of the counties of Cavan and Fermanagh. See the Feilire Aenguis at 5th of September, and battle of Magh-Rath, p. 283.

228. The Ui-Fiachrach, i.e., the descendants of Fiachra, the father of Dathi, last Pagan monarch of Ireland, in the beginning of the 5th century. The chiefs of the northern Ui-Fiachrach, after the establishment of surnames, were the O'Dowdas, and of the southern Ui-Fiachrach, the O'Heynes and O'Shaughnessys.

229. Ath-Slisen, otherwise called Bet atha slisen, now Belaslighen, a ford on the river Uair, within one mile of the town of Elphin, on the road to Strokestown. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1288, p. 446.

230. The Ui-Ruairc, i.e., the family of the O'Rourkes. Only three of this family were kings of Connaught, of whom the most distinguished was Art, who was slain in 1046. The other chiefs of the family were lords paramount of Breifne, the present county of Leitrim.

231. The Sil Muireadhaigh, i.e., the descendants of Muireadhach Muilleathan, king of Connaught, who died in the year 701. The people known by this name were the O'Conors of Magh Naoi, and their correlatives who, after the establishment of hereditary surnames, branched into various families and spread themselves over the neighboring territories; as the Mac Dermots, Mac Donoughs, O'Beirnes, O'Flannagans, Magheraghtys, O'Finaghtys. The O'Conors were of all these the most powerful, though the O'Finaghtys and Mac Dermots were senior to them. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 700, p. 301; and A.D. 1189, p. 87.

232. Duach Teangumha, i.e., Duach of the brazen tongue. He was king of Connaught, and died in the year 499 [500]. He was son of Fergus, son of Muireadhach Mael, son of Eoghan Sreimh, son of Duach Galach, son of Brian, son of Eochaidh Muighmheadhoin, monarch of Ireland. He was the ancestor of the O'Flahertys of West Connaught, but not of the O'Conors, O'Rourkes, or O'Reillys. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 499, p. 161, note p, and correct note; see also Hardiman's edition of O'Flaherty's Chorographical Description of Iar Connaught, p. 364, note b.

233. The Sil-Flaitbheartaigh, i.e., the race of Flaithbheartach, now the family of O'Flaherty. For their descent, see Chorographical Description of Iar Connaught, p. 364.

234. Clann-Cosgraigh, i.e., the race of Coscrach, a sept of the Ui-Briuin-Seola, seated east of Galway Bay. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1162, note a.

235. Clann-Maoilruana. - This was the tribe name of the family of Mac Dermot, of Moylurg, who descend from Maolruana, the eldest son of Tadhg an eich ghil, king of Connaught, A.D. 1014-1036.

236. Clann-Conchobhair, i.e., the family of the O'Conors of Connaught.

237. Both one tribe. - They are both descended from the same ancestor, and are both virtually O'Conors.

238. Clann-Cathail, i.e., race of Cathal, second son of Muireadhach Muilleathan, king of Connaught, who died A.D. 701. This was the tribe name of the O'Flangans of Magh Aoi, hereditary stewards to the kings of Connaught, whose territory originally comprised the parishes of Kilmacumshy, Kilcorkey, and Shankill, and the greater part of the parishes of Creeve and Elphin. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1289, p. 448, note s.

239. O'Maoilmordha, O'Mulmore. This family sank into obscurity at an early period, and is either extinct or the name is now obsolete.

240. O'Carthaigh, O'Carry, now unknown in Clancahill.

241. O'Mughroin, now O'Moran, or Moran. This name is still extant in the neighbourhood of Elphin.

242. O'Maoilbhrenainn, now anglicised Mulrenin, without the prefix O'. This family, which is of the same descent as the O'Flanagans, was seated in the parish of Baslick, near Ballintober, in the county of Roscommon. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1097, 1193.

243. Clann-Foghartaigh. - See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1151. Situation not determined.

244. Clann-Murthuile. - The situation of this tribe has not been determined. The name O'Maonaigh is now anglicised O'Meeny and Mooney.

245. Mag-Oireachtaigh, now anglicised MaGeraghy and Geraghty. This family was seated in magh-Naoi, before the English invasion; but in 1585, the head of the name was seated in Hy-Many. See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, p. 19.

246. Clann-Conmhaigh, now locally called Clanconoo. The name is now applied to a territory situated on the west side of the river Suck, in the barony of Ballimore and county of Galway; but it anciently extended to the east of the same river, in the now county of Roscommon. Shortly after the English invasion this territory came into the possession of a branch of the De Burgos, the head of whom was called Mac David, who was maternally descended from the Finaghtys.

We are informed by Duald Mac Firbis, that Conmhach, the ancestor of the Clann-Conmhaigh was the eldest son of Muiredhach Muillethan, king of Connaught, who died in 701, and that in consequence of this seniority, the O'Finaghty enjoyed considerable privileges under the kings of Connaught, viz., that he was entitled to drink the first cup at all the king's banquets; that all the descendants of the other sons of Muiredhach should rise up before the senior of the race of Conmhach. He adds that the O'Finaghtys had forty-eight ballys lying on both sides of the Suck before the English invasion. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1232, p. 265, note r.

247. Clann-Murchadha. - This was the tribe name of that sept of the Finaghtys seated on the east side of the river Suck, in the county of Roscommon. This territory comprised twenty-four ballys, or ancient Irish townlands. See Genealogies, Tribes, &c. of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 108, note b; and Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1225, p. 237.

248. Ui-Diarmada, otherwise Clann-Diarmada. This was the tribe name of the family of O'Concannon, chiefs of Corcamoe, in the barony of Killian and county of Galway. The head of this family had his seat at Kiltullagh, in the parish of Kilkerrin, locally called the parish of Corcamoe. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1382, note u.

249. Clann-Tomaltaigh. - This sept was seated in Magh Naoi, but their position has not been determined. The name Mac Murchadha is now obsolete in the county of Roscommon.

250. Siol-Fallamhain, i.e., the race of Fallamhan, or the familyof the O'Fallons. Their territory of Clann-Uadach, comprised the parish of Camma and Dysart, in the barony of Athlone and county of Roscommon. O'Fallon had his chief residence at Milltown, in the parish of Dysart, in 1585. See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, p. 19.

251. Clann-Maoilruana. - This was the tribe name of the Mac Dermots of the Sil-Murry race.

252. Magh-Luirg, usually anglicised Moylurg, a territory comprised in the present barony of Boyle, in the county of Roscommon.

253. Airtech, a territory comprising the parish of Tibohine, in the present barony of Frenchpark and county of Roscommon. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1228, note z. The name of this territory is still locally remembered.

254. Tir-Oilella, i.e., the land or territory of Oilell, now Tirerrill, a barony in the county of Sligo. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii., c. 79.

255. Tir-Tuathail, i.e., the land or territory of Tuathal, now Tihhuahil, a territory comprising the parish of Kilronan, in the barony of Boyle and county of Roscommon.

256. Fir-Tire, a people giving name to a territory in the barony of Carra, county of Mayo. The river of Castlebar flows through it. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 163, 205.

257. The Clann-Chuain. - They were divided from the Fir-Thire by the river Suir, now called the river of Castlebar. These territories originally belonged to the Ui-Fiachrach. See Tribes, &c., of Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 163, 205, 213.

258. Tir-Nechtain and Tir-Enda. - The positions of these territories are unknown.

259. Sen-Feargal, i.e., old Fergal O'Ruairc, king of Connaught, who was slain in the year 964.

260. Breifne.- This territory comprised the present counties of Leitrim and Cavan.

261. O'Ruairc, now O'Rourke and O'Rorke, and sometimes Rourke without the prefix O'.

262. The tribute of Connacht is due. - There were only three kings of Connaught of this family, viz., Sen-Fergal, who was slain in 964; Art, who was slain in 1046; and Donnell, son of Tiernan, who was slain in 1102.

263. MacTighearnain, now anglicised Mac Kernan, and sometimes Kernan without the prefix O'. Teallach Dunchadha is now anglicised Tullaghunco and Tullyhunco. It is the name of a barony in the west of the county of Cavan.

264. MacSamhradhain, now anglicised Magauran and MacGovern. Teallach Eachdhach is the present barony of Tullaghagh or Tullyhaw, in the north-west of the county of Cavan, where the Magaurans are still very numerous.

265. MacConsnamha, now Mac Kinnawe, and more usually anglicised Forde, being a false translation of Kinnawe, which is supposed to signify "head of the ford;" but this is a mere blunder, because Cusnamha (gen. Consnamha) the name of the ancestor from whom the appellation is derived, signifies, "dog of swimming." Clann-Chionaoith is more usually called Muintir Cionaoith, and is now anglicised Munter-Kenny. It is the local or traditional name of a territory in the barony of Dromahaire and county of Leitrim, and lies between Lough Allen and the river Arigna. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1217, note g.

266. MacCagadhain, now MacCogan, and Cogan without the prefix Mac. Clann Fearmaighe is now anglicised Glanfarne. It adjoins Munter-Kenny, and both territories are comprised in the barony of Dromahaire, in the county of Leitrim. Glanfarne stretches to the east and north-east of Lough Allen, and contains twenty-one quarters of land. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1217, note g.

267. Mag Dorchaidh, now Dorcey. The last chief of Cinel-Luachain of this family died in the year 1403. This territory comprised the parish of Oughteragh, situate at the foot of Slieve-an-ierin, in the east of the county of Leitrim. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1403, p. 778, note t.

268. Dartraighe. - This is still the local name for the barony of Rossclogher, in the county of Leitrim. It was the territory of the family of Mag-Flannchadha, now anglicised MacClancy, and more generally Clancy without the prefix Mac.

269. Calraighe. - The name of this territory is still retained in that of the parish of Calry, in the barony of Carbury and county of Sligo. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 482. The O'Cearbhaills or Carrolls of this territory are now unknown. the O'Finns are numerous, but have all dropped the O'.

270. O'Raghallaigh, now O'Reilly, and more frequently Reilly without the prefix O'. The family of O'Reilly supplied the chiefs to Muintir Maoilmordha, a territory which comprised the entire of the present county of Cavan, except the baronies of Tullyhaw and Tullyhunco, which belonged to O'Rourke. In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, however, these baronies were claimed by Sir John O'Reilly, and were confirmed to him by the government of that day.

271. Race of Fergus. - These were the descendants of Fergus MacRoigh, king of Ulster in the first century, who settled in many parts of Ireland; but the people whom are author is going to visit now were the Mag Rannells and O'Ferralls, and their correlatives of the counties of Leitrim and Longford, who were the chief families of the race of Fergus, or of the Clanna-Rory, in this part of Ireland.

272. O'Cuinn, now Quin without the prefix O'. Their territory of Munter Gillagan was distributed among the baronies of Ardagh, Moydow, and Shrule, in the county of Longford. The O'Quins of this race were dispossessed by the O'Ferralls in the fourteenth century. An inquisition, taken at Ardagh in the tenth year of Jac. I., found that thirty-five small cartrons of Montergalgan then belonged to O'Farrall Bane, and seventeen and a half cartrons to O'Farall Boye's part of the county of Longford. The O'Quins are still numerous in this territory.

273. Magh Breacraighe, a plain comprising the northern part of the barony of Moygoish, in the county of Westmeath, and extending also into the county of Longford. The name Mag Maoilisa is now obsolete in this district.

274. Mag-Finnbhairr, now Maginver, and sometimes anglicised Gaynor. The territoryof Muintir Geradhain, anglicised Munter-geran, is situated on the west side of Lough Gowna, in the county of Longford. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1080, p. 916, note x.

275. Mag-Raghnaill, now Magrannell, and more frequently anglicised Reynolds. The territory of Muinter-Eolais comprised the southern half of the present county of Leitrim. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1079, p. 51, note b.

276. Muintir Maoilmhiadhaigh, now O'Maoilmhiadhaigh, and anglicised Mulvey without the prefixed O'. Magh Nisi, otherwise called Muinter-Chearbhallain, from the tribe name of this family, and Upper Muintir-Eolais, was a level district on the east side of the Shannon, in the barony and county of Leitrim. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1243, p. 306, note l; and Hardiman's edition of Iar Connaught, p. 349.

277. Muintir-Fearghail, i.e., the family of O'Ferrall, who for many centuries were chief lords of the entire territory of Anghaile, in the present county of Longford, though the O'Quins of the same race were their seniors in point of genealogy. They had sometimes sovereignty over that sub-section of the race of Fergus, on the east side of the Shannon, but never over the whole race of Fergus, who had large territories in Connaught, as well as in Thomond and Kerry.

278. Cairbre, now the barony of Carbury, in the north of the county of Sligo. It derived its name from Cairbre, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, who was chief of this territory in St. Patrick's time.

279. O'Maoilcluiche. - This name is still common in the barony of Carbury, but it is always anglicised to Stone, from the idea that cluiche, the latter part of it, signified "stone;" but this a a mere blunder, for Maoilcluiche signifies youth of the game, on which signification ofthe name the author raises a kind of pun. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 275, note b.

280. Luighne, now the barony of Leyny, in the county of Sligo.

281. The Clanna-Cein, i.e., the septs descended from Cian (son of Oilioll Olum, king of Munser in the third century), whose grandson, Cormac Gaileng, settled here in the reign of Cormac MacAirt, monarch of Ireland. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 69.

282. O'h-Eaghra, now O'Hara, which is extinct in the senior branches but numerous in the junior branches, whose pedigrees are unknown.

283. O'h-Uathmharain, now obsolete. It would be anglicised Hofferan.

284. The Ui-Cearnachain. - O'Dugan blunders here, and it shows that he derived the materials of his poem from reading, and not from any actual visitation of the territories when he composed this poem. O'Cearnachain was lord of Luighne in Meath, and not of any territory in Connaught. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1030, 1056, 1159.

285. O'Gadhra, now O'Gara. He was lord of Coolavin and Sliabh Lugha. O'Dugan errs in making O'Gara be of the sept of Ui-Cearnachain.

286. O'Dobhailen, now Devlin, without the O'. He was lord of Corca-Firtri, in Corran, in the present county of Sligo. See Ogygia, part ii., c. 69.

287. O'Duinncathaigh. - This name would be anglicised O'Duncahy, or Duncahy, but it is little known at present.

28. Corann, now Corran, a barony in the county of Sligo. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 69, for the legendary or bardic derivation of this name.

289. Magh-Luirg. - Our author has already mentioned this territory in his notice of the Sil-Muireadhaigh, - vide sup ra note 252, p. xxxv.; but on his second visit to Connaught, he thinks it his duty to mention its more ancient chieftains of the Milesian or Scotic race.

290. Mag Eoch, would be anglicised Mageogh, or Keogh, but it seems obsolete in the territory of Moylurg at present.

291. Mag-Maonaigh, anglicised MacMeeny, now unknown in Moylurg.

292. Mag-Riabhaigh, anglicised Magreevy. This name is still extant, but little known. There was another familyof this name in the territoryof Calry, near Sligo.

293. Ui-Fiachrach, i.e., the race of Fiachra, son of Eochaidh Muighmheodhain, monarch of Ireland. The territory of the North Ui-Fiachrach comprised the baronies of Carra, Erris and Tirawley, in the county of Mayo, and the baronyof Tireragh, in the county of Sligo, besides that portion of the barony of Carbury, lying south of Drumcliff. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach.

294. Codhnach. - This was the name of a small stream which flows into the bay of Sligo, at the village of Drumcliff, in the barony of Carbury, and county of Sligo. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 278, 279, 301.

295. Rodhba, now the river Robe, flowing through the south of the county of Mayo, and through the town of Ballinrobe, to which it gives name, and discharges itself into Lough Mask, opposite the island of Inis-Rodhba. See Hy-Fiachrach, p. 143, note x.

296. O'Dubhda, now anglicised O'Dowda, O'Dowd, and sometimes Doody, without the prefix O'. See Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, p. 187, note d.

297. O'Muireadhaigh, now anglicised Murry and Murray, a name still common among the peasantry of the barony of Carra. See Ui-Fiachrach, p. 186, note b.

298. O'Gormog, now anglicsed Gorman, without the prefix O'.

299. O'Tighearnaigh, now anglicised Tierney and Tiernan. The name is common among the peasanty of the barony of Carra. See Ui-Fiachrach, p. 186, note b.

300. Ceara, now the barony of Carra, in the county of Mayo. The inhabitants of the northern part of this teritory had placed themselves under the protection of Mac Dermot of Moylurg, before the English invasion. See Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 163, 186, 187, 204, 205, 208.

301. The three tuathas. - These were the three territories in the east of the county of Roscommon, which are still known well. They were called Tir-Briuin-na-Sinna, Cinel-Dobhtha, and Corca-Eachlann, and formed a deaneryin the diocese of Elphin. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1189, p. 86, note d.

302. Muintir-Birn, i.e., the family of O'Beirne, who were chiefs of Ui-Briuin-na-Sinna, a beautiful district in the county of Roscommon, situate between Elphin and Jamestown, of which O'Monahan was chief up to the year 1249, but after that period it was the lordship of O'Beirne. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1218, note r.

303. Corca-Sheachlann, or Corca-Achlann, a territory in the east of the county of Roscommon, comprising the parishes of Bumlin, Kiltrustan and Cloonfinlough, and the western half of the parish of Lissonuffy. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1256, p. 458, note l. The Clann-Branain, or MacBranans of this territory are descended from the noble Druid, Ona, who granted Imleach-Ona, now Elphin, to St. Patrick. See Annals of Four Masters, A.d. 1256, p. 358, note l. The O'Maoilmhichils, or Mulvihils of this territory would appear to have lost their rank of chieftains at an early period, as only one notice of the family occurs in the Annals of the Four Masters, scil. at the year 1189. The MacBrannans still possess a small estate at Bellmont in the original territory.

304. Cinel-Dobhtha, now locally called Doohy-Hanly, from its chief O'Hanly, senior of the Cinel-Dobhtha family. This territory extended along the river Shannon, from Caranadoe Bridge to Drumdaff in the south of the parish of Kilgefin, and was divided from Corca-Achlann by the ridge of the mountain of Slieve Baune. It comprises the parishes of Kilglass, Termonbarry, Cloontuskert, and the eastern half of the parish of Lossonuffy. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1210, pp. 169, 170, note c.

305. Cinel-Fechin. - This would appear from the context to be the generic name for the three septs of the three Tuathas, but it does no appear from their line of descent that they ever had any such appellation.

306. Ciarraighe of the plain, now called Clann-Ceithernaigh, a district comprising the parish of Kilkeevin, in the modern barony of Castlerea in the west of the county of Roscommon. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1595 p. 1963, note r; and O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii., c. 46.

307. MacCeithearnaigh, now obsolete as a family name.

308. Clann-Cheirin, i.e., the family of O'Ceirin, now anglicised Kerrin, without the prefix O'.

309. Clann-Taidhg. - This sept was seated in Iochtar-tire. Mr. Molloy, of Oakport, in the county of Roscommon, is the present head of this family. The O'Molloys of this territory are to be distinguished from the O'Molloys of Fircall, in the King's country.

310. Siol-Maoilruana. - This was the tribe name of the O'Flynns of the county of Roscommon, and their territory comprised the entire of the parish of Kiltullagh, and a part of that of Kilkeevin. The Ui-Floinn or O'Flynns are still very numerous in the district.

311. Caille-Fothaidh. - The limits of this territory have not been determined. The family of O'Rothlain, now Rowley, was seated in the parish of Kilshesnan, barony of Gallen, and county of Mayo. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1208, p. 160, note n.

312. MacSgaithghil, now anglicised Scahill. The territory of Corca Mogha (Corcamoe), which comprised the parish of Kilkerrin, in the county of Galway, originally belonged to O'Scahill, before the English invasion, but they were soon after dispossessed by the Ui-Diarmada or O'Concannons.

313. Loch Gealgosa. - This name is now obsolete. It was probably the name of Urlare Lough, in the barony of Costello and county of Mayo. The O'Braoins, or O'Breens, of this territory are now unknown.

314. Eochaidh, i.e., Eochaidh Muighmheadhain, monarch of Ireland, father of Brian, ancestor of the kings of Connacht, and father also of Conall Orison, ancestor of the O'Malleys, chiefs of the two Umhalls, now the baronies of Murresk and Burrishoole, in the west of the county of Mayo. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii., c. 79.

315. Clann-Maille, i.e., the familyof O'Malley.

316. Prophets of the weather. - The O'Malleys are celebrated in several Irish poems as most expert seamen. Grace O'Malley, the daughter of Owen O'Malley, chief of this territory, was celebrated over all Ireland in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. She visited England, and was introduced to Queen Elizabeth by the Lord Deputy of that day by a letter which is still extant in the State Paper Office.

317. Conmaicne-Cuile-toladh, now the barony of Kilmaine, in the south of the county of Mayo. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 46. There are a few families of the sept of O'Talcharain still remaining in this barony, but they have dwindled into peasantry. They anglicise the name Tolleran.

318. Conmaicne-mara, i.e., Conmaicne of the sea, now Connemara in the barony of Ballynahinch, in the west of the county of Galway. Ogygia, part iii., c. 46.

319. O'Cadhla, now Keely. See Hardiman's edition of Iar-Connaught, p. 29, note w. This name was anglicised Quaeleus by the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Tuam, who was contemporary with Colgan, author of the Acta Sanctorum.

320. Conmaicne of Dunmor, now the barony of Dunmore, in the north of the county of Galway. Ogygia, part iii., c. 46.

321. Sidhlin to the Shannon. This is evidently a mistake.

322. Gno-mor, a territory in the west of the county of Galway; it comprised the northern and larger part of the barony of Moycullen, in the county of Galway. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 82. These were of the race of Lughaidh Dealbhaedh - of the Dalcassian race. The family of MacConroi have all anglicised their name to King, and their seat of Ballymaconry is now called Kingston! See Hardiman's edition of O'Flaherty's Iar-Connaught, pp. 52, 54, 62, 156, 252, 255, 391, 392.

323. Gno-beg. - This territory comprised the southern and smaller portion of the said barony of Moycullen. See Iar-Connaught, ubi supra. The name O'Hadhnaidh is now anglicised Heyny, without the prefix O'.

324. Clann-Choscraigh. These were a sub-section of the Ui-Briuin-Seola, seated on the east side of Lough Corrib, in the barony of Clare and county of Galway. The name MacAodha, is now anglicised MacHugh.

325. The race of Murchadh, more usually called Muintir-Murchadha, now anglicised Muntermorroghoe, applied to a district in the barony of Clare, and county of Galway. It was the tribe name of the family of O'Flaithbheartaigh, now O'Flaherty. See Iar-Connaught, 368.

326. Aidhne, a territory in the south of the county of Galway, coextensive with the diocese of Kilmacduagh. See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, p. 77, and Hy-Fiachrach, p. 52, note l.

327. Ui-Fiachrach, i.e., evidently of the southern Ui-Fiachrach, seated in Aidhne, for he has already treated of the northern Ui-Fiachrach, in the counties of mayo and Sligo.

328. Mac Gilla-Ceallaigh, now anglicised Killykelly, and Kilkelly, without the prefix Mac. The name is extant, and respectable in this district.

329. The Ui-Eidhin, i.e., the O'Heynes, a famous family of this territory, of the race of Gauire Aidhne, surnamed the Hospitable, king of Connaught, in the seventh century. See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach, pp. 398-406.

330. The Ui-Cleirigh, i.e., the O'Clerys. This family was originally seated in Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne, but was dispersed to different parts of Ireland after the English invasion. For a curious account of this family, as preserved by themselves, see Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 71 to 91, and 391 to 398.

331. Cinel-Cinngamhna, a tribe of the southern Ui-Fiachrach, situated near Kinvara, in the south-west of the county of Galway, descended from Seanach Cinngamhna, son of Eoghan Aidhne, and grandson of Dathi, the last pagan monarch of Ireland. O'Duibhghiolla, the name of the chief of this ancient sept, has not been identifed.

332. Caenraighe, a sept not of the race of Fiachra, but of the cognate race of Conn, who had been seated here before the Ui-Fiachrach. O'Maghna, their chief, is now unknown. See Hy-Fiachrach, p. 53.

333. Cinel-Aodha, i.e., the race of Aodh, son of Eochaidh Breac, son of Goibhnenn, son of Conall, son of Eoghan Aidhne, son of Eochaidh Breac, son of Dathi, last pagan monarch of Ireland. This tribe, whose chiefs in latter ages were the O'Shaughnessys and O'Cahills, possessed the eastern half of the diocese of Kilmacduagh, in the county of Galway. See Ui-Fiachrach, p. 55.

334. Echtghe, the name of a celebrated mountainous district on the confines of the counties of Galway and Clare. it is now generally called Sliabh Eachtaighe, anglice Slieve Aughty.

335. Maonmhagh, usually anglicised Moinmoy, a rich plain, lying around Loughrea, in the county of Galway. It was bounded on the east by the territory of Sil-Anmchadha, on the south by the mountain of Sliabh Echtghe, on the west by the diocese of Kilmacduagh. It comprised Moyode, Finure, and other places mentioned in the old Irish documents.

336. Caradh, now Caradh na dTuath (Carranadoo), in the barony of Ballintober east, in the county of Roscommon.

337. Grian, i.e., the river Grean, in the county of Claire, which was originally in the southern boundary of Hy-Many. See Tribes and Territories of Hy-Many, p. 134.

338. The great thrid of Connacht, in the territory of Hy-Many, which comprised the third part of the province of Connacht.

339. Sionainn, i.e., the river Shannon, which was the eastern boundary of Hy-Many, except in one point, where Hy-many extended beyond it, at least for several centuries, for it comprised the present parish of Lusmagh in the King's county.

340. Maedh-Siuil, now Knockmea, near Castle Hackett, about six miles south-east of Tuam, in the county of Galway. This was on the western boundary of Hy-Many.

341. O'Conaill. - This name is now unknown in Hy-Many. See Tribes and Territories of Hy-Many, p. 68.

342. Grian.- This river is now in the county of Clare, rising on the frontiers of the ancient Hy-Many. By "head of the great plain," is here meant, the head of the plain of Maonmhagh.

343. O'Neachtain, now anglicised O'Naghten, and, more usually, Naughton, and Norton, without the prefix O'. For the descent and present circumstances of this family, see Tribes, &c. of Hy-Many, pp. 70, and 176, 177.

344. O'Maolalaidh, now usually Mullally and Lally, without the prefix O'. After the English invasion this family was transferred from the plain of Maonmhagh, to the parish of Tuam, where their chief resided in the seventeenth century, where his descendants acquired European celebrity. For the pedigree of this family, see Tribes, &c., of Hy-Many, p. 71, and 177 to 183.

345. As far as Ui-Fiachrach. - This line shows that the plain of Maonmhagh extended westwards to the country of the Ui-Fiachrach Aidhne, which comprised the entire of the present diocese of Kilmacduagh.

346. The six Sodhans. - From various references it appears that the territory of these six septs (who were not of the Hy-Many, but of the race of Sodhan Salbhuidhe, son of Fiacha Araidhe, king of Ulster, about the year A.D. 240), were nearly co-extensive with the barony of Tiaquin, in the county of Galway. See Tribes, &c. of Hy-Many, p. 72, 73-159, 160-165. The O'Mannins and MacWards were the chief families of this territory; the others were O'Scurry, O'Lennain, O'Casain, O'Gialla, O'Maigin, and O'Duvagan. See Tribes, &c. of Hy-Many, p. 159.

347. Crumhthann.- This territory still retains its ancient name, which is anglicised Cruffon. It is a large district in the county of Galway, comprising the barony of Killyan, and a considerable portion of the adjoining barony of Ballimoe. The families mentioned in the text are now called Cahill, Moran, and Mulrony, withuot the prefix O', but no pedigrees of them are preserved.

348. Caladh. - This district was nearly coextensive with the barony of Kilconnell, in the county of Galway. The family name of O'Laodhog is now obsolete, but it is locally believed to be the name now anglicised Lee, the latter syllable being struck off. See Tribes and Territories of Hy-Many, pp. 74, 75.

349. Sionainn.- This cannot mean the river Shannon, because the territory of Caladh is very far from that river; either it should be na Suca, of the river Suck, or na Sionna bears some other meaning. See Hy-Many, p. 74.

350. Ui-Anmchadha, otherwise Siol-Anmchadha. The territory of this sept comprised the barony of Longford, in the county of Galway, in the King's county. Though O'Dugan makes O'h-Uallachain (now MacUllachain, anglicised Cuolahan), the chief of this territory, it would appear from the Irish annals that the family of O'Madden have been for centuries far more celebrated, and that O'h-Uallachain had no possessions on the west side of the Shannon for many centuries. See Tribes, &c. of Hy-Many, p. 41, and 183 to 188.

351. MacEitteagain.- This seems to be a corrupt writing of MacAedhagan, now MacEgan. See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, pp. 31, 86, 168.

352. MacGiolla-Fhionnagain, now unknown. See Tribes, &c., of Hy-many, pp. 30, 31, 75.

353. Clann-Chionaoith, otherwise called Muintir-Chionaoith. The family name was O'Cionaoith, now Kenny.

354. O'Domhnallain, now Donolan, without the prefix O'. See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, pp. 32,33, 76, 169, 174. The territory of this family, anciently called Clann-Breasail, is situated between the towns of Ballinasloe and Loughrea. For several centuries the chief mansion of the family has been called Ballydonolan.

355. Ui-Donnchadha. - O'Donaghue is now unknown.

356. Ui-Cormaic. - See Tribes, &c. of Hy-Many, pp. 76, 77.

357. The Lathach, i.e., the mire or quagmire. The situation of this territory is unknown to the editor. it is not Lathach Caichtubil, near Athlone.

358. Inis Duibhghinn.- It consisted of twelve ballies. This is probably the same name as O'Dubhagain or O'Dugan. See Tribes and Territories of Hy-Many, pp. 28, 29, 62, 75, 76, 77. Ballydugan, near Roscrea, is belieed to have been the head residence of this little territory.

359. O'Docamlain, now unknown, as is their territory of Rinn na hEighnidhe. See Tribes and Territories of Hy-Many, pp. 13, 76, 77, 85, 87, 90, 91.

360. Magh-Finn, i.e., fair plain; a territory in the barony of Athlone, county of Roscommon, containing forty quarters of land, and now commonly called Keogh's Country. The Keoghs or MacKeoghs, a branch of the O'Kellys, have been chiefs of this district for many centuries. The family of O'Maoilbrighde are now unknown in this neighborhood.

361. Brighit, i.e., St. Brighit, or Brigit, of Kildare, to whom this parish was dedicated. See Hy-Many, pp. 15, 75, 77, 78, 102, 130, 166, 167.

362. Bredach. - This was the old name of Magh-Finn.

NOTES TO THE PART OF O'DUGANS POEM RELATING TO LEINSTER.

363. MacMurchadha, i.e., Murchardides, or descendant of Murchadh, surnamed Maolnambo, king of Leinser, anglicised MacMurrough. The principal branch of this family took the surname of Caomhanach, from their progenitor, Domhnall Caomhanach, son (illegitimate, according to Giraldus), of the king of Leinster, at the period of the English invasion. This family is now known by the name of Kavanagh, and are very numerous in Leinster.

364. Ui n-Enechlais, more correctly, Ui-Enechglais. They were the descendants of Breasal Einechghlas, son of Cathaoir Mor, monarch of Ireland in the second century, and were seated in the present barony of Arklow and county of Wicklow. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 195, note g. The name O'Fiachrach is now obsolete.

365. Plain of Cualann. - This territory was called Fercuolen [Feara Cualann] in the reign of Elizabeth and Jac I. when it was considered to be coextensive with the manor of Powerscourt, but it was anciently much more extensive. The family of O'Cosgraigh is now unknown. They were dispossessed shortly after the English invasion by the families of o'Toole and O'Byrne.

366. Ui-Drona, now the barony of Idrone, in the county of Carlow. The O'Ryans, or Ryans, of this race are still very numerous, but they are to be distinguished from the O'Mulryans of the county of Tipperary, who also shorten their name to Ryan. Both, however, are of the race of Cathaoir Mor, king of Leinster in the second century.

367. The Ui-Muireadhaigh - This was the tribe name of the family of O'Tuathail, now anglicised O'Toole, and was also applied to their territory, which comprised about the southern half of the present county of Kildare. Shortly after the English invasion, the O'Tooles were driven from this level district, and they settled in the territory of Imaile, and soon after in that of Fercuolen. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 210, note i.

368. Ui-Faolain. - This was the tribe name of the Mac Eochaidhs (Keoghs) and O'Byrnes, and was also applied to their territory, which comprised about the northern half of the county of Kildare. They were driven from thence shortly after the English invasion, when they settled in the east of the present county of Wicklow.

369. Ui-Bairche. - This tribe, giving name to the territory in which they were seated, derived their name from Daire Barrach, second son of Cathaoir Mor, king of Leinster and monarch of Ireland in the second century. They were seated between the Ui-Drona and the Ui-Muireadhaigh, and possessed the whole of the present barony of Slievemargy, and some of the adjoining districts of the county of Carlow. The Mac Gormans were driven from this territory after the English invasion, and their chief settled in the barony of Ibrickan, in the west of Thomond, in the present county of Clare.

370.Ui-Failghe, i.e., the descenants of Rossa Failghe, the eldest son of Cathaoir Mor. The country of this tribe originally comprised the baronies of East and West Offaly, in the county of Kildare, those of Portuahinch and Tinnahinch in the Queen's county, and that portion of the King's county comprised in the diocese of Kildare and Leighlin. See Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 193, 216.

371. O'Brogarbhain, now unknown in Offaly.

372. Clann-Chionaith, now Kenny, obscure and little known in this territory.

373. Clann-Chonchobhair, i.e., the family of O'Conchobhair or O'Conor, who were the head chiefs of this territory till the reign of Philip and Mary, when they were dispossessed, after which O'Dempsey became the most powerful family of the Ui-Failghe, and remained so till the Revolution of 1688.

374. O'Duinns, i.e., the family of O'Doyne, or Dunn, of Iregan, now the barony of Portnahinch in the Queen's county. Colonel Francis Dunne, M.P. is the present head of this family.

375. O'Diomasaigh, now O'Dempsey, or Dempsey, without the prefix. The Viscount Clanmalier was the head of this family at the Revolution of 1688. They are now obscure, and sunk into poverty and degradation.

376. O'Aenghusa, now Hennessy, without the O'. The name is still common in the Queen's country, but confined to the lower classes.

377. O'Aimirgin, now anglicised Mergin and Bergin, a name very common about Geashill in the King's county.

378. Clann-Murchadhain, i.e., the family of O'Murchadhain, now called Morachain; but they are little known, and the name is sometimes anglicised Moran and Morin.

379. Cairbre, now the barony of Carbury, in the north-west of the county of Kildare. The family name, O'Ciardha, is now anglicised Keary and Carey, and the name is common, but to be found only among the lower orders. See Hy-Fiachrach, pp. 276, 277.

380. Osraighe, an ancient territory in Leinster, coextensive with the present diocese of Ossory.

381. Clann-Cearbhaill, i.e., the race of Cearbhall, a celebrated chief of Ossory in the middle of the ninth century.

382. Clann-Donnchadha, i.e., the family of O'Dunchadha, now anglicised Dunphy.

383. Mac Giollaphatraic, now anglicised Fitzpatrick.

384. O'Bruadair, now anglicised Brothers and Broderic.

385. Mac Braoin, now Breen, without the Mac.

386. O'Braonains, anglicised O'Brennan and Brennan, the name of a numerous sept in Ossory.

387. Three tribes of Munstermen.- These tribes were of the race of the kings of Leinster.

388. The Comar, or Confluence. This was the old name of Castlecomer, in the county of Kilkenny.

389. Ui-Eirc, now the barony of Iverk, in the south of the county of Kilkenny.

FOOTNOTES TO O'HUIDHRIN.

390. Who is not old. - Compare the observations in the poem of Dubhtach Mac Ui Lughair. Leabhar na gCeart, page 237.

391. Boinn, the Bubinda of Ptolemy, now the river Boyne, the country to the south of which O'Huidhrin undertook to describe.

392. Fodhla, one of the old names of Ireland. See note 2, supra.

393. Which Conn divided.- This alludes to the division made of Ireland, in the second century, into two equal parts, between Conn of the Hundred Battles, and Eoghan Mogh Nuadhat; a line of low gravel hills extending from Dublin to Clarin-bridge, near Galway, forming the boundary between them.

394. O'Dubhagain, i.e., John Mor O'Dubhagain, O'Duvegan, or O'Dugan, the author of the former part of this poem. Notwithstanding the evidence of this statement, Dr. Lynch attributes the whole of the two parts of the poem to O'Duveganus, which is incorrect. Both copies of the poems still extant are older than Lynch's time.

395. Daoil. - This was, and is still, the name of several rivers in Ireland. O'Huidhrin seems to have in view here the river Daoil (Deel), which rises in the mountains near Charleville, county Cork, flows through Rathkeale, in the county of Limerick, and pays its tribute to the Shannon. The Barrow, or the Slaney, would be more appropriately mentioned, in connexion with the race of Cathaoir.

396. Race of Cathaoir. - This race comprised the principal families of Leinster.

397. From ancient books. - This is the fact; for he mentions many families who were decayed in his time.

398. Leath-Mhogha, the southern half of Ireland. According to the bardic History, Eibher Finn, eldest son of Milesius, was the ancestor of the principal Milesian families of the south of Ireland.

399. Luimneach. - This name, though now generally believed to be the name of the city of Limerick, was anciently applied to the lower Shannon only.

400. The Gaoidhil, i.e., the Scoti, or Milesian Irish.

401. Province of the race of Cathaoir, i.e., the province of Laighin, now called Leinster.

402. Sabhrann. - This was an old name of the river Lee, in the county of Cork. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.d. 1163, p. 1151.

403. The Dun of Dubhlinn, i.e., the fort of Dublin.

404. Boirinn, i.e., Burren, a rocky barony in the north of the present county of Clare.

405. Mac Murchadha, usually anglicised Mac Murrough. The chief family of this race took the surname of Kavanagh, and the present chief of the name is Arthur Kavanagh, Esq., of Borris, in the county of Carlow, who inherits a very considerable portion of the territory of his ancestors. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1193, p. 97, note f. Nas, now the town of Naas, in the county of Kildare, was one of the chief seats of the kings of Leinster, from the remotest period, but it does not appear to have been at any time occupied by the family of Mac Murrough. It was rather the seat of the ancestors of the O'Byrnes, whose progenitors had been the earlier kings of Leinster.

406. Ui Failghe, usually anglicised Offaly, Ophaly, &c., a large territory in Leinster. It comprised the baronies of East and West Offaly, in the county of Kildare, those of Portnahinch and Tinnahinch, in the Queen's county, and that portion of the King's County comprised in the dioceses of Kildare and Leighlin. The Ui-Failghe were the descendants of Ross Failghe, the eldest son of Cathaoir Mor, monarch of Ireland in the second century.

407. O'Conchobhair, now anglicised O'Conor. The O'Conors of this race are to be distinguished from those of Silmurray, in Connaught, and various other families who bore the same name, but were of totally different stocks, as O'Conor of Kerry, O'Conor Corcomroe, O'Conor of Glengevin, &c.

408. Of the plain. - The territory of this race is a perfect plain, there being scarcely any elevation in its whole extent, from the hill of Croghan to Slieve Bloom.

409. Cruachan, originally called Cruachan Bri-Eile, now Croghan, a conspicuous hill in the barony of Lower Philipstown, in the north of King's County. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1385, p. 700. O'Conor Faly had a castle at the foot of this hill.

410. Sub-Chiefs, i.e., the chieftains subject to O'Conor Faly, who was the head chief or king of this territory.

411. Ui-Riagain, now anglicised Oregan, Iregan, and Dooregan. This territory still locally retains its ancient name, and is co-extensive with the barony of Tinnahinch, in the north-west of the Queen's County. The present representative of O'Duinn, of this territory, is Colonel Francis Duinne, M.P. For his pedigree, see Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1148, p. 968, and 1585, p. 1840.

412. O'h-Aenghusa, now Henessy, without the prefix O'. The family is still very numerous in Offaly but reduced to obscurity. Their territory of Clan-Colgain, which adjoined the hill of Croghan, is comprised in the barony of Lower Philipstown, in the King's County. For the descent of this family, see Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1414, pp. 819, 820.

413. Tuath-da-Mhuighe, i.e.,the cantred of the two plains, called Tuomoy on an old map of Leix and Offaly, made in the reign of Philip and Mary; and in other documents, Tethmoy. It appears from this map that Tuomoy Nether and Upper comprised the baronies of Warrenstown and Coolestown, in the King's County. The family name, O'Maoilchein, is now unknown in this territory.

414. Cantred of Geisill, now the barony of Geshill, in the King's County.

415. Border of Leinster. - He was in Leinster, and on the borders of the ancient Meath.

416. O'h-Aimirgin, now locally anglicised Bergin, but more correctly made Mergin in other parts of Leinster. This family is still very numerous.

417. Magh Aoife, a district in the barony of East Offaly, adjoining Tethmoy. O'Murchadhain is now shortened to Moran and Morrin, but the ancient Irish form is preserved by those who speak Irish.

418. Fidh Gaibhle. - This was the name of a celebrated wood of Leinster, in which St. Berchan erected the Church of Clonsasta. It is now locally called Fee-Goille or Fee-guile, and is situated in the parish of Cloonsast, barony of Coolestown, and King's County. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 214, note o.

419. Clann Maoilughra, usually anglicised Clanmaliere, a territory extending, on both sides of the river Barrow, into the King's and Queen's Counties. It contained the barony of Portnahinch, in the Queen's County, on the south side of the Barrow, and that of Upper Philipstown, in the King's County, on the north side of the same river. The name of O'Diomasaigh is now anglicised O'Dempsey. Its head was ennobled by Charles II., but the family is now reduced to obscurity in Clanmaliere. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1577.>/p>

420. Leghe. - This territory comprised the barony of Western Offaly, and a small portion of the northern part of the barony of Portnahinch, in which the great castle of Leighe, now Ley, or Lea, is situated.

421. Laoighis, usually anglicised Leix, and latinized Lagisia. This territory comprised the eastern and southern baronies of the present Queen's County. The present baronies of Upper Ossory, Portnahinch, and Tinnahinch, in the Queen's County, never formed any part of Leix.

422. Laoighis-Reata. - This was the most distinguished of the seven divisions of Laoighis, containing the fort of Rath-Bacain and the rock of Lec-Reda. See Annals of Four Masters, A.M. 3529, and A.D. 958, note a. The name O'Mordha is usually anglicised O'More, but it is sometimes made Moore, without the prefix O'.

423. Dun-Masc, now Dunamase, in the barony of East Maryborough, Queen's County. It is said to have derived this name from Masc, son of Augen Urgnuidh, the fourth son of Sedna Siothbhaic, ancestor of the people of Leinster. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 843, note a. It is a lofty isolated rock, on which formerly stood an earthen fort or stone Cathair, but which is now covered by the ruins of a strong castle. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 216, note q.

424. O'Duibh. - This is probably the name now anglicised Deevy and sometimes Devoy. Their territory of Cinel Crimthainn, extending round the fortress of Dun-Masc, is comprised in the barony of East Maryborough, in the Queen's County. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 216, note q.

425. Muintir-Fiodhbhuidhe. - The situation of this sept has not yet been determined.

426. Magh Druchtain. - This territory is still locally known, and is considered the best district in the whole of the Queen's County, extending from the ford of Ath-bateoige to the ford of Ath-fuiseoige, near Luggacurran. It is shown on an old mpa of "Leax and Ophaly," made in the reign of Queen Mary, under the name of FERAN O'KELLY, as extending from Ballymaddock, southwards to the hills of Slewmargie, and as comprising Ballymaddock, the Park, near Stradbally; and the churches of Grange and Oghteoge, and the castle of Coragh are shown as in this territory. The present head of this sept of the O'Kellys is Mr. Denis Kelly of Castletown-Omey, son of Thomas, son of Silvester, son of Laurence Kelly of Rathmore, near Ballyadams, who died in 1799. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1394, p. 733, note t.

427. Fruitful land of promise. - These words clearly show that O'Heerin was well acquainted with the fertility and beauty of this territory.

428. Gailine, now Gallen or Dysat-Gallen, in the barony of Cullenagh, Queen's County. It is shown on the old map of "Leax and Ophaly" as extending from near Abbeyleix to the boundary of Slewmargie, See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1394, p. 733, note s.

429. Crioch O m-Buidhe, a territory comprised in the present barony of Ballyadams, in the Queen's County. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 214. The church of Killabban was in it.

430. Bearbha, i.e., the River Barrow, which flows between this territory and that of Ui-Muireadhaigh.

431. O'Caollaidhe. - This name is still common in Leinster, but always incorrectly anglicised Kelly. It should be made O'Cayley or O'Kaely.

432. Ui-Barrtha, i.e., descendants of Daire Barrach, second son of Cathaoir, king of Leinster and of all Ireland, in the second century. This sept was seated in the barony of Slewmargy, in the south-east of the Queen's County. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 212, note m.

433. O'Gormain. - This family was driven from this territory after the English Invasion, and the chief of them ultimately fixed his residence in the barony of Ibrickan, in Thomond. The name of this family is alwyas written MacGormain in the Irish annals, and MacGorman on all the old tombstones of the family in the county of Clare. See Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 213, 214, note m.

434. Dinn-righ, i.e., the Hill of the Kings. This was the most ancient palace of the kings of Leinster. The ruins of it are pointed out in the townland of Ballyknockan, on the west side of the River Barrow, about a quarter of a mile to the south of Leighlin Bridge, in the county of Carlow. See Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 14, 15, note o.

435. Maistin, now Mullaghmast, a remarkable fort, situate on a hill of the same name, in the parish of Narraghmore, about five miles to the east of Athy, in the county of Kildare. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 14, note j. Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1577.

436. Ui-Muireadhaigh, called O'Murethi by Giraldus. This was the tribe name of the O'Tuathails, or O'Tooles, and their territory comprised about the southern half of the county of Kildare. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 210, note i, and Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1180, p. 51, note e.

437. Almhain, now Allen, a celebrated hill in the county of Kildare, situate about five miles northwards of the town of Kildare. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 14, note l.

438. Mac Giolla Mocholmog. - This family has been extinct for many centuries. They were chiefs of the territory of Ui-Dunchadha, comprising that portion of the present county of Dublin through which the River Dodder flows. See Annals of Four Masters, at the years 956, 995, 1032, 1044, 1155; and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 12, note f. For their pedigree, see Gilbert's History of Dublin, vol. i.; Appendix, No. 1, pp. 403-408.

439. Feara-Cualann, anglicised Fercuolen, an ancient territory, nearly coextensive with the half barony of Rathdown, in the north of the county of Wicklow. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 13, note b, and Ussher's Primordia, p. 846.

440. The plain of the Life, otherwise called Magh-Life. This was the name of a level plain in the county of Kildare, through which the River Liffey winds its course. The churhces of Cill-Ausaille and Cill-Cuillinn (Killossy and Kilcullen) are mentioned as in tis plain. See Colgan's Trias Thaum., p. 152, and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. i., pp. 273, 276.

441. West beyond Teamhair. - This must be a mistake.

442. O'Gealbrain. - This name does not occur in the Anals of the Four Masters, and seems to be obsolete at present.

443. O'Taidhg. - This name would be anglicised O'Teige; but it seems to be obsolete, unless it be one of the several old Irish names now anglicised Tighe.

444. Ui-Mail, now Imail, a well-known territory in the barony of Upper Talbotstown, in the county of Wicklow. The O'Tooles were driven into this territory shortly after the English Invasion.

445. Ui-Teigh. - This was the tribe name of the Ui-Ceallaigh Cualann in the north of the present county of Wicklow. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 713, note h; 765, note x; 915 note i.

446. Cairbre of Leinster, now the barony of Carbury, in the county of Kildare. See note 413, supra, and Tribes and Customs of Ui-Fiachrach, pp. 276, 277.

447. O'Ciardha, now anglicised Keary and Carey, a rather numerous name in the counties of Meath and Kildare.

448. Almhain, now the Hill of Allen, in the county of Kildare. From this it would appear that Cairbre Ua-Ciardha must have been originally extended to this hill.

449. Cruachan, now the conspicuous Hill of Croghan, in the barony of Lower Philipstown, in the north of the King's County. See note 409, supra.

450. Fortuatha of Leinster. - This territory comprised the Glen of Imail and Glendalough, in the present county of Wicklow. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 707, 774, 1039, and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 207, note d. O'Fearghaile was the chief of this territory.

451. From the Boinn. - This seems to indicate that the Fortuatha of Leinster were from the neighbourhood of the River Boyne, and were of the race of Colla, and Conn of the Hundred Battles.

452. Ui-Inechrais. - This is a mistake for Ui-Einechghlais, a tribe descended from Breasal Einechglais [Breasal of the Green Face], son of Cathaoir Mor, monarch of Ireland in the second century. This tribe was seated in the present barony of Arklow, in the south-east of the county of Wicklow. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 195, note g; p. 207, note e.

453. O'Fiachra. - This name is now unknown in the county of Wicklow. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1154, 1170.

454. Almhuin. - This is some place, now unknown, in the barony of Arklow, as it cannot be the Hill of Almhain or Allen, in the county of Kildare.

455. O'h-Aodha, now anglicised Hay and Hughes.

457. Ui-Muirte. - This name is now forgotten in Leinster. The situations of the territories of Cinel-Flaitheamhain and Ui-Mealla are now unknown.

458. O'Finntighearn, now anglicised Finneran.

459. O'Murchadha, anciently anglicised O'Murchoe, but now generally Murphy, without the prefix O'. See observations on this name at note 100, supra, and in the introduction to the present volume.

460. Ui-Felme, i.e., descendants of Felim, son of Enna Censellagh, king of Leinster in the fifth century. This was the tribe name of the O'Murchoes, and it was also applied, as usual among the old Irish, to their territory, which comprised the barony of Ballaghkeen, in the east of the county of Wexford, still called the Murroes territory. Connell O'Murchoe, the head of this family, lived at Toberlumnich, in the Murroes, in 1634. There was another respectable branch of the family at Oulartleigh, who possessed a considerable estate down to our own times. O'Murchadha, which is now anglicised Murphy, is the most prevalent name in the province of Leinster. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1381, p. 684, note m; also the Annuary of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society for the year 1858, vol. i., p. 1, p. 24, et seq.

461. Ui-Felme the northern. - The territory of this sept was situated in the present county of Carlow (and comprised the present parish of Tulloghphelim, in the barony of Rathvilly, county of Carlow), which retains the name. Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1381, note m, and Leabhar-na-gCeart, p. 208, note f.

462. O'Gairbhidh, now anglicised Garvey, without the prefix O'.

463. Tulach, now the town of Tullow (in the parish of Tulloghphelim), which was the residence of the chieftain of this territory.

464. Siol-Brain, now the barony of Shelburne, in the south-west of the county of Wexford.

465. Dubhthoire. - This name would be anglicised Duffry, which is now the name of a district near Mount Leinster, in the county of Wexford; but the place here referred to must be placed farther to the south-west.

466. From the Bearbha to the Slaine, i.e., from the River Barrow to the River Slaney.

467. Beanntraighe, now the barony of Bantry, in the county of Wexford, lying between these rivers. The Clann-Coscraigh are now unknown.

468. Fearann-deiscertach, i.e., the southern land. This is probably the present barony of Bargy. The fmaily name O'Duibhginn is still very common in Leinster, and is anglicised Deegin and Duggan. It is to be distinuished from O'Dubhagain.

469. Fothart of the Carn, so called from Carnsore point, its eastern extremity, now the barony of Forth, in the south-east of the county of Wexford. The people called Fotharta were, according to the Irish genealogists, the descendants of Eochaidh Finn Fothairt, brother of Conn of the Hundred Battles.

470. O'Lorcain, now always anglicised Larkin, without the prefix O'. This name is very common in Leinster, but the pedigree has not been preserved, as the family had sunk into obscurity at an early period.

471. Crioch-na-gCenel, also called Fearann na gCenel. - Fernegenall was granted by the Earl Richard Strongbow to Maurice de Prendergast. See Harris's Hibernica, p. 41. This territory would appear to have comprised the district around Artramont, and to be included in the barony of Shelmaliere East. It was divided from the town of Wexford by the River Slaney. The exact situation of this territory is pointed out as follows by Giraldus, Topographia Hib., Dist. ii., c. 32, where it is corruptly called Fernigenan: - "De ratis per sanctum Ivorum a Fernigenan expulsis. Est in Lagnenia provincia quaedam quae Fernigenan [Fernigenal] dicitur, quam a Gwesefordia solum Slanensis aqua disterminat. Unde mures maiores qui vulgariter Rati vocantur per imprecationem Sancti Yuori Episcopi (cujus forte libros corroserant) prorsus expulsi, nec ibi postea nasci nec vivere possunt inuecti."

472. O'h-Artghoile, now Hartley or Hartilly, without the prefix O'. This name is still extant in south Leinster, where the Irish-speaking people pronounce it O'h-Airtialla.

473. O'Riaghain, now made Ryan, a name still extant in the county of Carlow. It is to be distinuished from O'Mulryan, of the county of Tipperary, which is now usually shortened to Ryan, with the O' or the Mul.

474. Ui-Drona. - This tribe, descended from Drona, the fourth in descent from Cathaoir Mor, monarch of Ireland in the second century, gave its name to the barony of Idrone, in the county of Carlow. See Leabhar-na-gCeart, p. 212, note k.

475. O'Nuallain, now anglicised Nolan, without the prefix O'.

476. Fotharta, generally called Fotharta-Fea, now the barony of Forth, in the county of Carlow. O'Flaherty states, in his Ogygia, part iii. c. 64, that the posterity of Eochaidh Finn Fothart remained chiefs of tis territory till the death of O'Nuallan, the last proprietor, who died a short time before he was writing. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 211.

477. Magh-da-chon, plain of the two hounds. This name is now anglicised Moyacomb, a parish in the barony of Rathvilly, in the county of Carlow, and extending into the barony of Shillelagh, in the county of Wicklow. It is sometimes called Farron O'Neale. O'Neill of this territory is now unknown. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1088, p. 930, note l.

478. Siol-Elaigh, i.e., the race of Elach, now the barony of Shillelagh, in the S.W. of the county of Wicklow. The Commissioners appointed for forming the county of Wicklow, on the 10th of January, 1605, described the territorial situation of this barony as follows:-

"And haveing viewed and surveyed the Irish territorie, called Shilellagh, [they say and present] that it is bounded on the south side by the territorie of Kilteile, alias MacMorishe's countrie in the co. Wexford, on the west by the countrie of Farren O'Neale and the lordshipp of Tully [Offelimy] in the county Catherlagh, on the north and east by the lordshipp of Clonemore, and the territorie of Cosha." See Erck's Repertory of the Chancery Inrolments.

479. O'Gaoithin, now anglicised Geehan, Gihon, and Gahan, without the prefix O'. This name is still common in the barony of Shillelagh, and throughout Leinster, but obscure and reduced, with very few exceptions.

480. O'Dunlaing, now anglicised Dowling, without the prefix O'. This family would appear from out text to have been situated on the east side of the Barrow; but the old map of Leax and Ophaly, already referred to, places O'Dowling's countrie on the west side of the Barrow, and in the present Queen's County.

481. Across the Bearbha. - From this is is quite clear that the last-mentioned territory, namely, the Lagan, O'Dunlaing's territory, was on the east side of the Barrow, for the author next proceeds [westwards] across that river into Ossory.

482. Mac Giollaphatraic, now anglicised Fitzpatrick. The ancient Ossory comprised the barony of Upper Ossory, in the Queen's County, and nearly the entire of the county of Kilkenny. It is stated by Keating and others that Ossory originally extended from the Barrow westwards to the Suir; but there is sufficient evidence to show that since the introduction of Christianity, its limits never extended beyond those of the present diocese of Ossory. See Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 17, 18, note a.

483. Bladhma, now Slieve Bloom, on the frontiers of King's and Queen's Counties.

484. To the sea, i.e., to the estuary called the Meeting of the Three Waters, near Waterford.

485. Liathdruim. - This is one of the ancient names of Tara, and is incorrectly applied here. There are several places of the name in Ireland, but none in Ossory.

486. To the plain of Munster, i.e., from the Barrow to the plain of Magh Feimhin, in the county of Tipperary.

487. Coill Uachtorach, now the barony of Upperwoods, the present legal name of a subdivision of the old barony of Upper Ossory, at the foot of Slieve Bloom, in the Queen's County.

488. O'Dubhshlaine, now anglicised Delany, without the prefix O'. This family is still very numerous in this territory.

489. Mountain of most beauteous rivers. - This is Slieve Bloom, in which the three sister rivers, the Suir, Nore and Barrow, have their sources.

490. O'Cearbhaill, now Carroll. He was a descendant of the celebrated Cearbhall, chief lord of Ossory from 845 to 885. He is to be distinuished from O'Carroll, of Ely O'Carroll, seated at the other side of Slieve Bloom, who was of a different race.

491. O'Donnchadha, now anglicised throughout the diocese of Ossory Dunphy. The chief of this family, Donogh O'Donoghue, was the founder of the abbey of Jerpoint in 1180, in which he was interred in the year 1185. See Archdall's Monasticon, county Kilkenny, Jerpoint.

492. Gabhran, now the barony of Gowran, in the county of Kilkenny.

493. Cill Chainnigh, i.e, the cell or church of St. Canice, now Kilkenny. "Of the limestones" is peculiarly characterstic, and it were to be wished that our author had given us more geological notices of this nature.

494. Sliabh gCaithle. - This name is now forgotten, nor has any authority been found to fix the limits of the territory of O'Carroll of Ossory. It probably extended from the church of Kilkenny to the mountains of Fasaghdineen, comprising all the rich lands between the present town and these mountains.

495. The sea is smooth, i.e., whenever he goes on the sea it becomes calm and smooth, in consequence of his justice and righteousness.

496. Ui-Duach of Osraighe. - For several centuries this territory is considered as coextensive with the barony of Fassadinin, in the county of Kilkenny; but it was anciently more extensive, as appears from the words of our author, who calls it "the extensive plain of the Feoir," i.e., of the river Nore. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 850, note e, p. 484, and p. 26, note g.

497. O'Braonain, now always anglicised Brennan, without the O'. The noted Dr. John Brennan, of Dublin, commonly called "the Wrestling Doctor," was the last recognised chief of this sept. Families of the name of Brennan are still exceedingly numerous in their original territory, but their pedigrees are unknown.

498. MacBraoin, now Breen, without the prefix Mac. The situation of this family is uncertain.

499. O'Broithe. - This family is still so called by those who speak Irish, and anglicised O'Broghie in the Patent Rolls of the first and fourth year of James I.; but the name is now usually pronounced Brophy. Their territory comprised the level portion of the barony of Galmoy, in the county of Kilkenny. This family is still numerous through the ancient Ossory, and in the neighbouring districts of the county of Tipperary. They were driven from the plain of Magh Sedna into Upper Ossory, after the English Invasion, and their chief settled at Ballybrophy, near Borrish-in-Ossory, in the Queen's County. In 1603 Patrick O'Broghie was of Reo, in this county. The name of Sedna, now anglice Shade, is still hereditary in this family.

500. Magh Lacha, a plain in the barony of Kells, county of Kilkenny.

501. O'Faolain, now Phelan and Whelan, without the prefix O'. This family is very numerous throughout the ancient Ossory. The Phelans of this race are to be distinguished from those of the Decies of Munster.

502. Magh-Airbh, a plain in the barony of Crannagh, in the county of Kilkenny.

503. O'Caibhdeanaigh, now anglicised Keveny, and by some Gaffney; but the name O'Gamhna is that usually anglicised throughout the ancient Ossory.

504. Coill O gCathasaigh, i.e., wood of the Ui-Cathasaigh.

505.O'Gloiairn. This name was anglicised Glory, but it is now obsolete. See the Annuary of Kilkenny, &c., Archaeological Society, vol. i. part ii. p. 101, note b.

506. The Callann, now the King's River, on which the twon of Callan stands. It has its source in the hills near Tullaroan, and flowing through Callan, and past Kells and Stonyford, joins the Suir at Annamult.

507. Ui-Berchon, anglice Ibercon, an ancient barony in the county of Kilkenny, forming the northern portion of the present barony of Ida, which comprises three ancient baronies, namely Ida, Igrine, and Ibercon.

508. O'Caolluidhe, now always anglicised Kelly, which is incorrect. It should be Cayley, or at least Keally, with the first syllable long.

509. Bright-flowing Bearbha. - Ros-Ua-Berchon, now Rosbercon, which formed the eastern extremity of this territory, is on the west bank of the river Barrow.

510. Ui-Eirc, now Iverk, a barony forming the southern portion of the county of Kilkenny. It is watered by the Suir and the river of Graney, which frequently flood some adjacent districts, and cover them with sand.

511. O'Bruadair, anglicised Broder and Broderic, a ame now reduced to obscurity in this territory.

512. Maonmhagh. - This was the name of a plain (Moinmoy), extending round Loughrea, in the county of Galway. The territory of Iverk is, however, at present, far richer, more beautiful, and better cultivated.

513. The Siuir, i.e., the sister, now the river Suir. It rises at the eastern base of Sliabh Ailduin, now the Devil's Bit mountain, in the county of Tipperary, and passes through the towns of Thurles, Cahir, Clonmel, and Carrick, whence it forms the boundary between the counties of Kilkenny and Waterford, till it joins the Barrow.

514. Magh Feimhin. - The ancient name of a plain comprising that portion of the present county of Tipperary which belongs to the diocese of Lismore. It is described as extending from the river Suir northwards to Corca-Eathrach, from which it is clear that it comprised the whole of the barony of Iffa and Offa East. See Colgan's Trias Thaum., p. 201, and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. i. p. 282.

515. Caisel of the kings, i.e., stone fort of the kings, now the town of Cashel, in the county of Tipperary, the seat of the kings of Munster from the beginning of the fifth century till the English Invasion. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 28, note a.

516. Corc. - He was king of Munster early in the fifth century, but the authentic irish annals contain no notice of his death. His grandson, Aenghus MacNadfraich, who is said to have been the first Christian king of Munster, was slain in the year 489. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 489, and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 28, note c.

517. Corca-Athrach. - O'Flaherty describes this territory as extending in length from Tiprait-farran, near the abbey of the Holy Cross, called Huachtar-Iamhann, to Dunandreas, and the northern part of Knockgraffan. Ogygia, part iii., c. 81.

518. Plain of Tal. - Tal was a cognomen of Cormac Cais, ancestor of Dal-gCais.

519. Brian, i.e., Brian Borumha, ancestor of the O'Briens of Thomond, who became monarch of Ireland in 1002, and was killed at Clontarf in the year 1014. He was called Borumha because he renewed the cow tribute of Leinster, which had been remitted by Finachta, monarch of Ireland, in the seventh century. Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 690, p. 299, note x.

520. Tailgenn. - This was the name by which St. Patrick was called by the Druids. It is explained circulo tonsus in capite by Colgan, but Asciciput in the Book of Armagh, p. 5, col. 2, p. 49, col. 1, and p. 123, col. 2.

521. Eoghan, son of Oilioll, i.e., Eoghan, eldest son of Oilioll Olum, king of Munster in the third century.

522. MacCarthaigh, now anglicised Mac Carthy. This family was driven from Cashel shortly after the English Invasion, and they settled in the now counties of Kerry and Cork, where, in course of time, they became very numerous.

523. Eoghanacht of Caisel. - This was the original tribe name of the O'Donoghues, who were anciently seated in Magh-Feimhin, now the barony of Iffa and Offa East, in the S.E. of the county of Tipperary. They were driven from this territory shortly after the English Invasion, when they settled in the present barony of Magunihy, in the county of Kerry, to which they gave the name of Eoghanacht Ui Donnchadha, anglicised Onaght-O'Donoghue.

524. Sliabh Ardachaidh, now the barony of Slievardagh, in the county of Tipperary.

525. O'Deaghaidh, now anglicised Day, without the prefix O'. This family is to be distinguished from the O'Deaghaidhs, or O'Deas, of Cinel-Fearmaic, in Thomond, who of of the Dalcassian race.

526. O'h-Oilella. - This name is now obsolete, as is every derivative in Ireland formed from Oilioll, whether belonging to man or place, except Tir-Oilella, in the county of Sligo, which has been corrupted to Tirerrill. According to this analogy, O'h-Oilella might be anglicised O'Herrill, or Herrill; but there is no such surname now in Ireland.

527. O'Brachain, now Brahan.

528. Deisi. - This tribe descended from Fiacha Suighdhe, the elder brother of the monarch Conn of the Hundred Battles, and were originally seated in Deisi Teamhrach, the present barony of Deece, to the south of Tara, in Meath; but they were expelled from thence in the third century by their relative, king Cormac, grandson of Conn, and after having attempted to obtain a footing in various parts of the south of Ireland, they ultimately settled in Munster, and subdued that part of the country extending from the river Suir to the sea, and from Lismore to Credan Head, the eastern extremity of the present county of Waterford. In the fifth century, Aenghus Mac Nadfaeich, king of Munster, granted them the plain of Magh Feimhin, in the present county of Tipperary; but they were driven from thence by the Eoghanachts. See Keating's History of Ireland; and Ogygia, part iii.,c. 69.

529. O'Bric, now Brick, without the prefix O'. This family originally possessed the southern Desies, comprised in the present county of Waterford, but they had sunk under the O'Faelains or O'Phelans, who were originally seated in the northern Decies, in the present county of Tipperary, some time before the English invasion.

530. O'Faelain, now made Phelan, in the anglicised form of the name, without the prefix O'; and by some, Whelan.

531. O'Mearadhaigh, now O'Meara, or O'Mara, a name still numerous in the county of Tipperary. by many the prefix is rejected.

532. Ui-Fathaidh, now the barony of Iffa and Offa West, in the county of Tipperary.

533. Ui-Eoghain Finn. - The territory of this tribe was in northern Deisi, in the present county of Tipperary, and adjoining Iverk on the west side. See the Miscellany of the Archaeological Society, vol. i., p. 205. The O'Neills of this race, the head of whom was an esquire in 1753, were afterwards seated at Mount Neill, in the barony of Iverk, county Kilkenny.

534. Uachtar-tire, now the barony of Upperthird, in the north-west of the county of Waterford. The O'Flanagans of this race were dispossessed shortly after the English Invasion by the Anglo-Norman family of Poer, now Power, who still possess a large portion of this territory.

535. Ui-Aithele. - The name of this tribe and territory, evidently situated between the barony of Upperthird and the sea, is now obsolete. The O'Breslins of this race are also unknown.

536. O'Fodhladha, now Foley, without the prefix O'. This family is very numerous in the county of Waterford.

537. O'Cein, now Kean, a name still extant in the county of Waterford, and to be distinguished from the family of O'Cathain, now anglicised Kane, without the prefix O'. The two great tragedians of world-wide fame are of this race.

538. Machuin, now the river Mahon, which rises near Kilmacthomas, and falls into the sea at the village of Bun Machuine (Bunmahon).

539. Ui-Eachach. - This was the tribe name of the O'Bricks.

540. Inis-Fail, one of the ancient names of Ireland.

541. O'Bric, now Brick, without the prefix O'.

542. Lec Logha. - Tis was probably the ancient name of the remarkable rock now called Clochlobhrais, situated about midway between Kilmacthomas and Dungarvan, in the county of Waterford.

543. Liathdruim, i.e., gray ridge, now Leitrim, on the confines of the counties of Waterford and Cork.

544. Feara Muighe. - This name is now preserved in Fermoy, a beautiful and fertile barony in the north of the county of Cork; but the ancient Feara Maighe comprised the modern baronies of Fermoy, and Condons and Clangibbon. See Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 78, 82, 261.

545. O'Dubhagain, now O'Dugan, and more usually Duggan. This family descends from the Druid Mogh Ruith, Magus Rotae, who was of the race of Rughraighe, king of Ulster. See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 82.

546. Dun Manann. - This name is now obsolete; it was evidently that of the chief residence of O'Dubhagain, who possessed about the northern half of the territory of Feara Maighe Feine, being seated between O'Keeffe and the Ui-Fidhgeinte.

547. O'Caoimh, now anglicised O'Keeffe, and by many Keeffe, without the prefix O'. O'Keeffe originally possessed the district now called Roche's Country, which formed the southern half of the ancient Feara Maighe. The family is of the race of Oilioll Olum, and had a king of Munster, namely Fionguine, son of Gorman, who died in the year 902; since which period the line of MacCarthy has been far more powerful. The O'Keeffes were driven from Fermoy shortly after the English Invasion, when they settled in the present barony of Duhallow.

548. Gleannomhain, or Gleann Amhnach, now Glanworth, in Roche's Country, in the north of the county of Cork. This was the original seat of O'Keeffe. See Smith, Natural and Civil History of Cork, book ii., chap. 7, and Leabhar na gCeart, p. 90, note s.

549. Ui Liathain. - This tribe derived their name and origin from Eochaidh Liathanach, son of Daire Cearba, ancestor of the Ui-Fidhgeinte. Their territory was nearly coextensive with the present barony of Barrymore, in the county of Cork. See Hibernia Expugnata, lib. ii., c. 8, 19, and Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 73, 74.

550. O'Anamchadhas. - This name is obsolete, or changed into some anglicised form not now recognisable.

551. Ui-Mac Caille, now the barony of Imokilly, in the county of Cork.

552. O'Breaghdha. - This name is now unknown. It might be anglicised Bray.

553. O'Glaisin, now unknown. It is not the name anglicised Gleason or Gleeson.

554. Ciarraighe Chuirche, now Kerrycurrihy, a barony in county of Cork.

555. Race of Torna, i.e., the sept of Ui Torna. The hereditary family name was O'Cuirre, which is now little known.

556. Cinel-Aedha, i.e., the race of Aedh (father of Failbhe Flann, king of Munster, A.D. 636), now the barony of Kinelea, in the county of Cork.

557. O'Ceallachain, now O'Callaghan. This family, which is of the same race as the MacCarthys, was removed from the barony of Kinelea shortly after the English Invasion, when they settled in the barony of Duhallow, where they possessed the parishes of Kilshannick and Clonmeen. See Harris's edition of Ware's Works, vol. ii., p. 72, and Smith's History of Cork, book ii., chap. 6. The senior branch of this family was transplanted to the county of Clare by Cromwell, where it became extinct in the male line earlyl in the nineteenth century. Lord Lismore is the present head of this family in Ireland. See Circuit of Murchertach MacNeill, p. 64, for the descent of O'Callaghan and Mac Carthy.

558. Plain of Bearra. - This seems a mistake, as O'Callaghan never had any connextion with the territory of Bearra.

559. Cinel mBece, i.e., the race of Bece, son of Fergus, who ws the son of Felimy, king of Desmond, A.D. 584, and ancestor of O'Mahony. See Battle of Magh-Rath, Geneal. Tab. p. 340, and Payne's Description of Ireland, edited by Dr. Aquilla Smith, p. 23.

560. Bandain, now the river Bandon in the county of Cork.

561. Rapid Muaidh seems to be the name of a river, but the name is now unknown in the county of Cork.

562. O'Mathghamhna, not anglicised O'Mahony, and sometimes Mahony, without the prefix O'. The senior of this family is probably in France. O'Mahony of Dunloe, in Kerry, is believed to be the present head of the family in Ireland.

563. Race of Lughaidh. - These were the O'Driscolls, who, according to the Irish genealogists, descend from Lughaidh Mac Ithu, the uncle of Milesius of Spain. See the Miscellany of the Celtic Society, 1849, pp. 56, 57.

564. O'h-Eidirsceoil, now O'Driscoll, and sometimes Driscoll, without the prefix O'. Ibid, p. 56, and 384-400.

565. Corca Laighdhe. - This, which was the tribe name of the O'Driscolls, was also applied to their territory, which originally comprised all the south-west part of the present county of Cork, namely, the baronies of Carbery, Beare, and Bantry; but shortly after the English Invasion they were encroached upon by the O'Donovans, O'Mahonys, and O'Sullivans, and more recently by the MacCarthy Reaghs, who reduced their principality, comprising the parishes of Myross, Glanbarahane [Castlehaven], Tullagh, Creagh, Kilcoe, Aghadown, and Clear, to much narrower limits. See Miscellany of the Celtic Society, p. 48-57 and p. 148.

566. Harbour of Clear, i.e., the bay between Cape Clear and Mizen Head, in the south of the county of Cork.

567. O'Floinns of Arda, i.e., O'Flynn of Ardagh. The chief family resided at Ardagh Castle, situate nearly midway between Skibbereen and Baltimore, in the barony of West Carbery, and county of Cork. See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, under Flann and Cobhthach, and the Miscellany for the Celtic Society, pp. 9,10, 36.

568. Ui-Baghamhna, now the barony of Ibawn, in the south of the county of Cork, ibid., p. 36.

569. Tricha ched medhonach, i.e., the central cantred. This was the old name of the present barony of Barryroe, in the county of Cork. See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, in voce COBHTHACH. Dr. O'Brien, who knew this part of Ireland well, speaking of the families of O'Cowhig and O'Floinn Arda, about the middle of the last century, has the following observation which nearly holds good at the present day: "But the melancholy remark which remains to be made is, that, of the two families first mentioned, there is not, to my knowledge, one individual now existing that may be held in the light of a gentleman, having been dispossessed long since of their very ancient and large properties; which, indeed, is the case with many other Irish families, not less illustrious in former times, who are now quite extinct, or reduced to a state of perfect obscurity, for the reason now mentioned."

570. O'Cobhthaigh. - Dr. O'Brien anglicises this name O'Cowhig, which seems to have been the form of the name in use, in his time, among this sept in the county of Cork; but in other more northern parts of Ireland, it is anglicised Coffey, without the prefix O'. Dr. Smith, in his "Natural and Civil History of Cork," book ii. c. 3, writes of this family: "Almost on every headland of this barony were castles erected by the Irish, seve of which belonged to the sept of O'Cowhig, as Dundeedy, Dunowen, Dunore, Duneen, Dunocowhig, Dunworley, and Dungorley."

571. Land of Cliodhna, i.e., bordering on Tonn Cliodhna, a loud surge in the bay of Glandore, much celebrated by Irish poets.

572. Muintir-Bhaire, now Muntervary, a peninsula in the barony of West Carbery in the south-west of the county of Cork, extending from Bantry to Sheepshead, and containing the parish of Kilcrohane. See Corca-Laidhe, in the Miscellany of the Celtic Society, p. 5, and Tribes of Ireland, pp. 11 to 15.

573. Warlike Fothadh. - He was the third son of Lughaidh Maccon, king of Ireland, in the second century. See Corca Laidhe, p. 5, note n.

574. O'Baire. - This name is now obsolete, unless it has been assimilated to the Anglo-Norman name of Barry. This territory belong to the bardic family of O'Daly for several centuries. See Tribes of Ireland, p. 14; and Pacata Hibernia, book iii.

575. Plain of Manainn. - This seems to refer to the plain lying round the fort of Dun-Manann, which, however, was the seat of O'Dubhagain in Fear-Maighe or Fermoy, with which, it must be confessed, Muinter Bhaire can bear no comparison in point of fertility, though it may vie with it in picturesque beauty.

576. O'h-Eidersceoil of Bearra, i.e., O'Driscoll of Beare, a barnoy in the south-west of the county of Cork, which was possessed by the Driscolls till dispossessed by a branch of the O'Sullivans, some time after the English Invasion.

577. The harbour of Baoi, now Bantry Bay. The island of Baoi Bheirre, in this bay, is now called Beare Island.

578. The race of Lughaidh, i.e., the O'Driscolls and their correlatives.

579. The land of Ith, a bardic appellative for the O'Driscoll territory.

580. Clann t-Sealbhaigh, i.e., the race of Sealbhach. This was the tribe name of the O'Donoghues of the county of Kerry. O'Domhnaill (O'Donnell) was one of the ancient chiefs of the race, but the name has been long obsolete.

581. O'Donnchadha of Loch Lein, i.e., O'Donoghue of Ross, at Lough Leane or Killarney, county of Kerry.

582. O'Donnchadha of the Flesc, i.e., O'Donoghue of Glenflesk, i.e., the vale of the river Flesk in Kerry. The present O'Donoghue is the head of this family. See Tribes of Ireland, p. 71.

583. On Munster. - Dubhdabhoirenn, ancestor of O'Donoghue, was king of Munster in 957, and his son Domhnall, who was slain at the battle of Clontarf, A.D. 1014, was king of Desmond.

584. Ui-Floinn of Lua, i.e., the territory of Muscraighe Ui-Fhloinn, or Muskerrylin, which contains fifteen parishes, and is correctly described as around the far extending Lee and Lua, now Lough Lua, in the barony of Muskerry, through which the river Lee flows. See Leabhar na g-Ceart, p. 44.

585. O'Bece. - This name, which would be anglicised Beck, has long since sunk into oblivion.

586. Beanntraighe, now the barony of Bantry, in the county of Cork.

587. Fergus of Uladh, i.e., Fergus Mac Roigh, exiled king of Ulster, in the first century, from which O'Conor Kerry, O'Conor of Corcumroe, O'Loughlin, and many other famlies in Munster are descended.

588. Ui-Eachach, i.e, the descendant of Eochaidh, son of Cas, son of Corc, king of Munster. The Ui-Mathghamhna, or O'Mahonys, were the chief family of this race. They wre first seated in the barony of Kinelmeaky, in the county of Cork, but they afterwards encroached on the Corca-Laighe, and became masters of the district called Fonn-Iartharach, i.e., western land. The name of Ui-Eathach is usually anglicised Ivahagh, and is shown on several maps of Munster, made in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I. It comprised, according to the Liber Regalis Visitationis of 1615, the parishes of Kilmore, Scool, Kilcrohane, Durris, Kilmoconnoge, and Caheragh, in the south-west of the county of Cork.

589. O'Mathghamhna, now O'Mahony. See note on Cinel m-Bece, supra.

590. Aos Aisde. - This name is now forgotten; but as it was the tribe-name of the family of O'Muircheartaigh, now o'Moriarty, or more usually Moriarty, without the prefix O', we must conclude that it was the name of a territory along the river Mang in Kerry.

591. O'h-Imhasbhain. This name is now unknown in Munster.

592. Race of Conaire, i.e., of Conaire II., of the Deagads of Munster, monarch of ireland in the year 212. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 63.

593. Tulach-an-Trir, i.e., hill of the three persons. This was one of the most ancient names of Tara. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 17.

594. Corca Duibhne. - These were of the race of Conaire I., monarch of ireland, at the beginning of the first century (Ogygia, part iii., c. 45), and after the establishment of surnames, they branched into the families of O'Falvey, O'Shea, and O'Conghaile (O'Connell). Shortly anterior to the English Invasion O'Falvy possessed the barony of Corcaguiny, O'Shea that of Iveragh, and O'Conghaile (O'Connell), that of Magunihy; but about the middle of the eleventh century, the O'Donoghues settled in Magunihy, and drove the O'Conghailes westwards into Iveragh, where they were seated at Ballycarbery as castellans to Mac Carthy More. The territories of this race of Conaire extended to the Suir, in the county of Tipperary.

595. O'Seagha, now anglicised O'Shea. A branch of this family removed to the city of Kilkenny, about the end of the fourteenth century, where they became wealthy and highly respectable.

596. O'Conghaile, now corrupted to O'Conaill, anglicised O'Connell. The head of this family was transplanted by Cromwell to Brenter, near Callan hill in the county of Clare.

597. Magh O'gCoinchinn, now Mugunihy, forming the eastern portion of the county of Kerry. The O'Conghailes were driven from this territory in the eleventh centry by the O'Donoghues, who gave it their tribe name of Eoghanacht O'Donoghue.

598. O'Faiblhe, anglice O'Falvy and Falvy, without the prefix O'. Their territory originally extended from the river Maing to Finntraigh, now Ventry, in the west of the county of Kerry.

599. Ui-Fathach. This ws the tribe name of the O'Sheas. it is now anglicised Iveragh, which is a well-known barony in the west of the county of Kerry.

600. Muscraighe. - According to all our genealogical Irish MSS. the Muscraighe were descendants of Cairbre Musc, son of Conaire Mor, monarch of Ireland, in the beginning of the third century. Ogygia, part iii., c. 63.

601. Mairtine of Munster, an ancient tribe of the Firbolgs of whose territory Emly, in the county of Tipperary, was the centre and capital.

602. Muscraighe-Mitine, otherwise called Muscraighe Ui-Fhloinn. This was the ancient name of the barony of West Muskerry, in the county of Cork. The family of O'Maoilfabhaill of this race is now unknown. It is quite clear that our author is here compiling his enumeration of chiefs and territories from written authoritesd, and not from the famlies existing in his time. See note 583, supra, on the territory of O'Floinn of Lua, which is evidently the one here referred to, but belonging to a different epoch. Neither of these families were dominant here in our author's time.

603. O'h-Aodh, now anglicised O'Hea and Hayes, but the O'h-Aodhas of this race are quite obscure.

604. Muscraighe Luachra, about the Abhainn mhor, a territory extending on both sides of the Blackwater, near its source, in the north-west of the county of Cork. - See Leabhar na gCeart, p. 44.

605. Muscraighe of the Three Plains. - This territory was granted by king John to William de Barry, under the name of Muskerry Donegan. The family of O'Donegan is still extant in this territory, but reduced to poverty and obscurity. Dr. James Donegan, the author of the Greek-English Dictionary, who was a native of Charleville, was of them. "The church of Fiort Seithe, which is placed by the Calendars of Marianus, and the Four Masters (Sept. 6), in Muscraighe-tri-maighe, is now known by the name of Ardskeagh, which is a small parish in tht part of the barony of Fermoy bordering on the barony of Orrery and Kilmore. In the ancient taxations of the diocese of Cloyne we find a rural deanery, called Muscry-donnegan, containing the parishes now comprehended in the barony of Orrery and Kilmore, with small adjacent portions of Duhallow and Fermoy. Among the churhces in this deanery, Orwery [i.e., Orbraidhe, or Orrery] and Fersketh [i.e., Feart Skeithe, called Ardskagh, in 1615, now Ardskeagh] are two. Thus the identity of Muscraighe-tri-maighe and the barony of Orrey is proved to a demonstration and O'Brien's statement on the subject (Irish Dict., voc. Muscraighe) fully established." - Note communicated by Dr. Reeves.

606. Iarann. - This was evidently the name of a river, but it is now obsolete.

607. Tuath-Saxon, i.e., the cantred of the Saxons. This is the ancient name of the district containing the paish of Tullylease in the north-west of the county of Cork, of which St. Berichert, a Saxon, is the patron. It is probable that this saint established a Saxon colony here in the eighth century, in the same way as St. Cairnech had established a colony of Britons at Tuilen, near Kells, in Meath. The family of O'h-Ionmhainen, now anglicised Noonan, were the herenachs of the church of Tullylease. See Dr. Reeve's Paper on St. Beretchert, in the Ulster Journal of Archaeology, vol. vi., p. 267.

608. Race of Conaire, i.e., of Conaire II. See note 591 supra.

609. Muscraighe Treithirne, also called Muscraighe Breogain and Muscraighe Chuirc. This territory is now comprised in the barony of Clanwilliam, in the south-west of the county of Tipperary. The family name, O'Cuirc, is now anglicised Quirk, without the prefix O'.

610. O'Maoilbhloghain. - This name is still extant, and anglicised Malone or Mulowne; but this family is to be distinguished from that of O'Maoileoin, which is similarly anglicised.

611. O'Carthaigh. - This name, which is to be distinguished from that of MacCarthaigh, is still extant, and anglicised Carty, without the prefix O'.

612. Muscraighe of the west of Feimhen, so-called from its lying to the west of Magh Feimhen, in the county of Tipperary.

613. Muscraighe-tire.- This territory comprises the present barony of Lower Ormond, and a part of that of Upper Ormond, in the county of Tipperary. Its extent is defined by Sir Charles O'Carroll in a letter to the Lord Deputy, in 1585, in which he calls it Muschryhyry, and states that the Earl of Ormonde lately called it by the false name of Lower Ormonde, a designation which it had never borne before, inasmuch as it was always considered a part of Thomond.

614. O'Donghalaigh, now anglicised Donnelly, without the prefix O'. This family is to be distinguished from the O'Donnellys of Tryone, who are of a totally different race.

615. O'Fuirg, now obsolete.

616. Corca-Baiscinns. - Our author here follows the race, and proceeds from the east side of the Shannon to the west of Thomond. These were the descendants of Cairbre Baschaoin, the brother of Cairbre Musc, already mentioned. The two Corca-Baiscinns originally comprised the baronies of Clonderalaw, Moyarta, and Ibrickan, in the west of the county of Clare.

617. Muintir Domhnaill, i.e., the family of O'Domhnaill, now anglice O'Donnell.

618. O'Baiscinn, now anglicised Baskin, without the prefix O'. These two famlies of the race of Cairbre Baschaoin were dispossessed by the MacMahons, a branch of the O'Briens, early in the fourteenth century.

619. Tree over the Boinn, so called because his ancestor was king of Tara, and Meath, through which the River Boyne flows.

620. Ui-Bracain, now the barony of Ibrickan, in the west of the county of Clare. After the expulsion of the Mac Gormans from Leinster (see note on Ui-Bairrche, supra), shortly after the English Invasion, they were settled in this territory by O'Brien.

621. O'Maolcorcra. - This name is now unknown in the barony of Ibrickan. This family would appear to have sunk into insignificance when the Mac Gormans were planted in their territory by O'Brien.

622. The two Invers, i.e., Liscanor Bay and Dunbeg Bay, at the extremities of the territory of Ibrickan.

623. Fochla, i.e., the north, alluding to Ibrickan being the most northern portion of the country of the Corca-Baiscinn, of the race of Conaire II., in North Munster.

624. O'Ceallaigh. - The king of Cashel was bound to defend O'Ceallaigh. Was O'Ceallaigh of Hy-Many bound to protect the race of Cairbre Baschaoin, son of Conaire II.? This is obscure.

625. Conaire of Cliach, alluding to the battle of Cliach, where Conaire I. defeated Nuada Finn, king of Leinster.

626. Ernai, i.e., the Ernaans of Munster, who descended from Ederscel, the father of Conaire I., monarch of Ireland, A.M. 3944. See Ogygia, part iii., c. 44.

627. Race of Fergus, ex-king of Ulster, in the first century. This Fergus, surnamed Mac Roigh, had three sons by Meadhbh, queen of Connaught, namely, Ciar, ancestor of all the Ciarraighe; Corc, ancestor of the Corcumroe, of Thomond; and Conmac, ancestor of all the Conmaicni of Connaught and Moy-Rein. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii., c. 42 and 46.

628. Ciarraighe, now anglice Kerry.

629. O'Conchobhair, now O'Conor, or O'Conor Kerry.

630. From the Strand, i.e., the country of the Ciarraighe which extended from the strand of the harbour of Tralee to the River Sinainn, now Shannon, and comprised about the northern third part of the present county of Kerry.

631. O'Laoghain, now anglicised Lane, without the prefix O'.

632. Ui-Feabha. - Situation not proved.

633. O'Caithneannaigh. - This name is now unknown in Kerry.

634. Battle-peaks of Cualann. - Cualann is a mountainous territory in Leinster; but it is probable that the name is here intended for the mountains of Sliabh Mis, Cathair Conroi, &c., in the barony of Trughanackmy, and county of Kerry.

635. O'Duibhduin. - This family is now unknown in Kerry, as well as the name and situation of their territory of Ui-Flannain.

636. Alltraighe. - This sept were seated around the river of Tralee, as we learn from the Latin Lives of St. Brendan, in which it is stated that that saint, who was of the Alltraighe, was born at Littus Ly (Lighe), now Tralee.

637. O'Neidhe. - This name is still extant in Kerry, but by a whim of custom anglicised to Neville! A branch of this family was seated at Knockpatrick, in the county of Limerick, where they were hereditary keepers of Saint Patrick's Bell. John Neville, esq., M.R.I.A., engineer for the county of Louth, is of this family.

638. Clan Conaire, i.e., the family of O'Conaire, now anglicised Connery, without the prefix O'.

639. Corcumruadh, otherwise called Corc Modhruadh, i.e., the descendants of Corc Modhruad, third son of Fergus, dethroned king of Ulster, in the first century. The country of Corcomruadh was originally coextensive with the diocese of Kilfenora, and comprised the present baronies of Corcomroe and Burrin, in the north-west of the county of Clare. The bard here, following the tribes genealogically, jumps from Kerry to Clare to describe the territories of the race of Fergus of Ulster. The families of O'Dicholla, O'Maoileitigh, and O'Draighnen, of Sliabh-Eise, are now unknown in this territory. The name O'Draighnen is extant in other parts of Ireland, and anglicised Drinan. Sliabh-Eise may be the present Sliabh Eilbhe, on the confines of Burrin and Coromroe baronies.

640. Fear-Arda, i.e., men of the point. This was another name for the Corcumruadh. The island of Inis-caerach, now Mutton Island, near Kilmurry Ibrickan, was in the territory of Feara-Arda.

641. O'Conchobhair, now O'Conor. This family had considerable possessions in the barony of Corcomroe, in the year 1584, and for some time after; but at the present day, there is not a man of the race above the rank of cottier or small farmer.

642. Conach. - This was probably the old name of the river Farsett, which rises in Binn Formaoile, and falls into Lisconor Bay, near Duagh Castle.

643. O'Lochlainn, now O'Loughlin. - This family has been somewhat more fortunate than their relations the O'Conors, for there are some respectable gentlemen of the name, as O'Loughlin, of Newtown, and Sir Colman O'Loghlen, but their pedigrees have not been made out with anything like certainty.

644. Boirinn, i.e., a rocky district, now the barony of Burren, in the north of the county of Clare. It was originally considered a part of Corcomroe, and called East Corcomroe; and it is curious to observe that the abbey of Corcomroe is situated in Burren.

645. Tealach-Chuirc. - This was the tribe name of the O'Loughlins.

646. Dal Meadhruaidh. - This was another name of the Corca Modhruadh. They are called the host of Macha, because they came from Ulster, where Eamhain Macha was the name of their original palace.

647. Race of musical Ciar, i.e., the Ciarraighe.

648. The race of Tal, i.e., the people of Corcumruadh, so called from their ancestor Tal, son of Broc, who was the eleventh in descent from Modhruadh. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1573, p. 1669, note u.

649. Turn we westwards. - This is a mistake, because the province of the race of Maicniadh, by which Desmond ishere meant, is nearly due south of the race of Tal, or the people of Corcomroe.

650. Prevailed over Cruachan, i.e., whose ancestor Fergus had possession of Cruachan, when he seduced Meadhbh, queen of Connacht.

651. Old Luachair. - This was the name of a territory of great extent situate to the south of the country of the Ciarraighe, and extending into the present counties of Cork and Limerick.

652. Plain of Luachair. - This was the name of the level plain portion of the present barony of Magunihy, in the S.E. of the present oounty of Kerry; but it formed no part of the country of the ancient Ciarraighe. It comprised the territories of O'Keeffe, O'Callaghan, O'Donoghue and MacAuliffe.

653. O'Dunadhaigh, now anglicised Doney and Denny, witout the prefix O'.

654. O'Donnchadha, not anglicised O'Donoghue. O'Donoghue of Loch Lein, or the Lakes of Killarney, is now unknown. He hadhis residence at Ross Castle, near Killarney, and was head chieftain over the whole territory of Eoghanacht Ui Donnchadha (anglicised Onaght-Idonoghue), which, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, was considered as coextensive with the present barony of Magunihy. O'Donoghue of Glenflesk is the only known representative of this family.

655. O'Cearbhaill, anglice O'Carroll. There was a family of this name in Magunihy preceding the O'Donoghues; but they sunk into poverty and obscurity many centuries since, and are now unknown.

656. O'Caoimh, now O'Keeffe. The position of Urluachair is marked by the Crown lands of Pobble O'Keeffe, situate in the barony of Duhallow, on the confines of the counties or Cork, Limerick, and Kerry, and containing about 9,000 statute acres; but this territory was originally much more extensive, for we learn from ancient authorities that the two Paps of Danaan, now the Pap Mountains, were in it. See Cormac's Glossary in voce Anann; and Keating's History of Ireland, Haliday's edition, p. 104; also Leabhar na gCeart, p. 75.

657. O'Ceallachain. - The O'Ceallachains, now O'Callaghans, are descended from Ceallachan, son of Domhnall, son of Murchadh, son of Donnchadh, son of Ceallachan, king of Cashel, or Munster, who died in the year 954. See Circuit of Muircheartach Mac Neill, p. 64. Before the English Invasion the O'Callaghans were seated in the barony of Cinel-Aedha, now Kinelea, in the south of the county of Cork; but being driven from thence by Robert Fitzstephen and Milo de Cogan, they settled in the barony of Duhallow, in the north of the same county, where the chief of the family, Conor O'Callaghan, resided at the Castle of Drumaneen, on the Blackwater, in 1594, and then enjoyed extensive territorial possessions, comprising the parishes of Kilshannig and Clonmeen, as appears from an inquisition taken at Mallow before Sir Thomas Norris, Vice-President of Munster, on the 25th of Octorber, 1594. The head of this family was transplanted by Cromwell to the county of Clare. Lord Lismore is the present chief of the name in Ireland.

658. The river Ella, now the Allo or Allow, which springs from the acclivities of the Use mountains, in the N.W. of the county of cork, and pays its tribute to the Blackwater ten miles below Kanturk.

659. Gleann Salchain, a valley extending N.W. of Newmarket, in the barony of Duhallow, and county Cork.

660. MacAmhlaoibh, now Mac Auliffe. The chief residence of Mac Auliffe was Castle Mac Auliffe, near Newmarket; and his territory with that of Aes-Ella, or people of the river Allo, comprised all that wild, mountainous, and heathy district lying between Newmarket and the boundaries of the counties of Limerick and Kerry, where the rivers Feale, Allo, and Blackwater have their sources. The head of this family, who had been born to a handsome estate, was weighmaster in this market-house at Kenmare, in 1840, when the editor had a long conversation with him on the traditions of this wild district of Aes-Ealla.

661. O'Tedgamhna.- This name is now obsolete, and the family seems to have sunk under the Mac Auliffes and O'Keefes at an early period.

662. Dun Durlais. - if this was a proper name it is now obsolete. It might mean simply, of the strong fort. Durlis and Derlish, as well as Thurles, occur commonly as names of townlands and earthen forts.

663. Across Luachair. - This shows that Luachair was conterminous with the territory of Claonghais, now Clonlish, a wild district in the barony of Upper Connelloe, in the county of Limerick, and on the confines of the counties of Cork and Kerry. Luachair evidently comprised the countries of O'Donoghue, O'Keeffe, O'Callaghan and Mac Auliffe, or the barony of Magunihy, in the county of Kerry, and that of Duhallow, in the county of Cork.

664. Ui-Conaill, now the baronies of Upper and Lower Connello, in the county of Limerick.

665. O'Coilens, now Collins, without the prefix O'. The head of this family was afterwards driven from this territory, and settled in the barony of Carbery, county Cork. The family is still numerous in the original territory.

666. O'Billraidhe. - This name is now obsolete. This family, after being expelled from Ui-Conaill Gabhra, settled at Cnocan Ui-Bhillraidhe, now Watergrass Hill, in the county of Cork.

667. Mac Innerigh, now Mac Eniry.

668. Corca-Muicheat. - This name is still preserved, and is an alias name for Castletown Mac Eniry, in the barony of Upper Conello, in the county of Limerick. Mac Eniry descends from Sedna, the fourth son of Cairbre Aebhdha, ancestor of the Ui Cairbre; and though his territory is now a part of the barony of Upper Connello, it was originally a portion of the territory of the Ui-Cairbre Aebhdha. The Mac Enirys were never driven from this territory, and had considerable estates here up to the period of the Revolution; but they are all at present reduced to poverty and obscurity.

669. Corca-Oiche. - The exact situation of this territory is unknown. The family of O'Macasa is still extant, and anglicised Macassey and Maxey, without the prefix O'. The name is more numerous in the county of Tipperary than in that of Limerick at the present day.

670. Ui-Rossa, now Iveross, or Iveruss, a parish on the Shannon, in the barony of Kenry, and county Limerick. The name O'Bearga, which might be anglicised O'Bargie, or Bargie, is now obsolete.

671. Caonraighe, now the barony of Kenry, in the north of the county of Limerick.

672. O'Maolcallann. - This name is now obsolete in this part of Ireland. In other places it is anglicised Mulholland or Mulhollan, without the prefix O'.

673. Dal-Cairbre-Ebha, otherwise Ui Cairbre Aebhdha. The territory of this tribe comprised the present barony of Coshma, in the county of Limerick, and the plains extending thence down to the Shannon.

674. O'Cleirchin, now O'Clerchain, and anglicised Clerkan and Cleary. The name is still extant in this territory, but the family is reduced to poverty and obscurity.

675. O'Donnabhain, now anglicised O'Donovan, and more frequently Donovan, without the prefix O'. This family, of the senior line of Oilioll Olum, was expelled from this territory shortly after the English Invasion by the O'Briens and Fitzgeralds, and they settled in O'Driscoll's country in the county of Cork. Their principal seats had been at Bruree and Croom in the present county of Limerick.

676. Dun Cuirc, i.e., the fort of Cork. This is a bardic name for Bruree, the seat of O'Donovan.

677. The Maigh, i.e., the river of the plain, now the Maigue, which rises near Charleville, and passing through Croom and Adare, falls into the Shannon nine miles below Limerick.

678. Down to the Sionainn, i.e., down or northwards to the Shannon.

679. Eoghanacht-Aine, the name of a tribe and territory lying round Kockany, in the barony of Small County, and county of Limerick.

680. O'Ciarmhaic, now anglicised Kerwick, but more generally changed to Kirby.

681. Ui-Enda, now Heney, without the O'. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1205, 1215.

682. Aine-Aulum, situation not determined.

683. O'Suilleabhain, now O'Sullivan. This family was originally seated at Knockraffon, in the barony of Middlethird, county Tipperary, but they were driven from thence shortly after the English Invasion, by the family of De Burgo, when they settled in the present counties of Cork and Kerry.

684. Eoghanacht-Aradh. - This would appear to be same as Eoghanacht-Caille-na-manach, which is the present barony of Kilnamanagh, in the county of Tipperary. O'Cuile is probably the name now anglicised Quill. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1046.

685. Aolmhagh, i.e., limestone plain. The exact situation of this territory, which was in the county Tipperary, is now unknown. The name O'Caollaighe is now anglicised Kelly. It seems to be a mistake for O'Caella, a name still numerous, and anglicised Kyley.

686. Eoghanacht of Crich-Cathbhuidh. - This territory is also in the now county of Tipperary, extending, according to the Book of Lismore, fol. 208, from Fert Moraidh to Sliabh Eibhlinne. The Abhainn Ua gCathbhadha, now the river of Nenagh, flows through this district. It rises at the boundary of the barony of Kilnamanagh and Upper Ormond, and flows westwards through the latter for several miles, then winding north-west of Nenagh, after a course of about thirty-five miles. See Book of Leinster, fol. 105.

687. O'Duineachair, now anglised Donaher, without the prefix O'.

688. Eoghanacht of Rosarguid. - This was a territory in the barony of Upper Ormond, in the present county of Tipperary. O'Mergdha, or O'Meara, of this race, had his seat at Toomyvara, in this barony.

689. Carn-Mughaine, i.e., the carn or sepulchral heap of Mughain, a woman's name. This carn is still to be seen near Toomyvara.

690. Siol-Maoilduin. - This sept of the Eoghanachts and their seat of Dun gCais, are now unknown. From the reference to the water it is propable that they were seated on the east side of Loch Dergdheirc, to the north-west of Nenagh.

691. Eachdhruim, now unknown. The name is usually anglicised Aughrim.

692. Eoghanacht of Gabhra. - This is another name of Ui-Conaill-Gabhra, now the barony of Connello, in the county of Limerick.

693. O'Cinnfhaeladh, now anglicised Kinealy without the prefix O'. This family is now reduced to poverty and obscurity, but the name is still numerous among the peasantry.

694. Aes-Greine. - This territory is comprised in the present barony of Clanwilliam, in the county of Limerick. See Aes-tri-maighe, infra.

695. O'Conaing. - This name is now anglicised Gunning. Their chief seat was at Caislen-Ui-Conaing, now corruptly anglicised Castleconnell, but they have long since sunk into poverty and obscurity, having been dispossessed by the Burkes shortly after the English Invasion.

696. Saingil, now Singland, near Limerick, originally included in O'Conaing's territory.

697. Grian, now Pallis-grean, which originally belonged to this territory, of Aes-Greine, though now included in the barony of Coonagh.

698. The race of Cormac Cas. - These were the O'Briens of Thomond and their correlatives, who were in O'Huidhrin's times, principally seated to the north of the river Shannon, but they had a considerable territory to the south of it, in the present county Limerick. See a curious genealogical account of the people of Dal-Cais of Thomond, in O'Flaherty's Ogyga, part iii. c. 81, 82.

699. Lorc of the lamp. - This was Lorcan, grandfather of Brian Boruumha.

700. Deis-beg. - This was the ancient name of the present barony of Small County, in the county of Limerick. The town of Bruff was the chief seat of this territory, and is still called Brugh na Deise by all the Irish-speaking people of the counties of Tipperary, Waterford, and Kilkenny.

701. Claire. - This was the ancient name of a hill near Duntryleague, in the barony of Small County. Oilioll Olum, the great ancestor of the kings of Munster, was buried in this hill, and a remarkable cromlech was raised over him, which still remains in good preservation.

702. O'Luoin, now Loane, and sometimes anglicised Lamb.

703. Ui-Duibhrosa, now unknown. The name would be anglicised Duross.

704. O'Faircheallaigh, anglicised Farrelly, in other parts of Ireland; but the name is unknown at Duntryleague, and there is scarcely one of the name in the barony of Small County.

705. Martine, an old sept of the Firbolgs, of whose territory Emly, in this neighbourhood, was the seat and centre.

706. Collan, now Slieve Collane, or the Callan mountain, about five miles to the east of Milltown Malbay, in the barony of Ibrickan, and county of Clare, celebrated for its Ogham inscription. The western and south-western part of the county of Clare, as we have already seen, originally belonged to the Corca-Bhaiscinn.

707. Upper Cantred. - This was included in the present barony of Inchiquin, in the county of Clare. The baronies of Corcomroe and Burren originally belonged, as we have already seen, to the race of Fergus MacRoigh, king of Ulster, i.e., the O'Conors and O'Loughlins, so that the country of the O'Deas was the Upper Cantred of Cal Cais.

708. O'Deadhaigh, now anglicised O'Dea, the O' being generally retained in this territory, but in other parts of Ireland it is anglicised Day, without the prefix O'. This family was called by Irish genealogists, Aes Iar Forgas, from their situation on the west side of the river Fergus. They had seats at Tully O'Dea and Disert Tola. The O'Deas derive their surname from Deaghaidh, the 20th in descent from Cormac Cas, a quo Dal Cais.

709. Tealach, now Tullyodea, in the parish of Ruan, barony of Inchiquin, county of Clare, and about three miles to the north of the church of Dysert.

710. O'Cuinn, now anglicised Quin, without the prefix O'.

711. Muinter-Ifearnain. - This was the tribe name of the O'Quins, in the county of Clare, whose territory extended around Coradh-Finne, now Corofin, in the barony of Inchiquin, and county of Clare. Inchiquin was the original seat of this family, but they were driven from thence by the O'Briens, in the fourteenth century. The O'Quins derived this tribe name of Muinter-Iffernain, from Iffernan, son of corc, the fifteenth in descent from Cormac Cas, the progenitor of all the Dalcassian septs. See Genealogical Table in Battle of Magh Rath, opposite p. 340.

712. Ui-Flaithri. - The situation of this territory, as well as of Finnchoradh, is now unknown.

713. O'Cathail, now Cahill, without the prefix O'; but the name has sunk into poverty and obscurity.

714. Brentir, now Breintre, a district comprising seven townlands lying north-east of Sliabh Collain, in the county of Clare. The tribe name Cinel-Baith is now obsolete.

715. Eidhneach, now Inagh, a small river near Milltown Malby, in the west of the county of Clare. It is also the name of a Roman Catholic parish through which this river flows. O'Maoilmeadha would be now anglicised O'Mulvey or Mulvey, but it is obsolete in this district.

716. Ui-Corbmaic. - This name is still locally rememberd, and is now applied to a district comprising the parish of Kilmaley, in the county of Clare; but it can be proved from various authorities that it originally comprised all the barony of Islands, except the parish of Clondagad, which was a part of East Corca-Vaskin. O'Haichir, now anglicised O'Hehir and Hare, was of the sept of the Ui-Fidhgeinte, of the race of Eoghan, son of Oilioll Olum, and not of the race of Cormac Cas; but no accounty has been yet discovered of when or by what means they effected a settlement in Thomond.

717. Ui-Flannchadha. - Situation unknown; but it is probable that it adjoined the last-mentioned territory.

718. O'Duibhginn. - This seems a mistake for O'Griobhtha, now Griffy and Griffin. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 2483, 1588.

719. Muintir-Connlochtaigh, otherwise called Cinel Cuallachta. According to the Caithreim Thoirdhealbhaigh this territory comprised the south-eastern part of the barony of Inchiquin, county Clare. The castles of Ballygriffy and Mogowna were in it.

720. O'Grada, now anglicised O'Grady.

721. Cinel-Dunghaile. - This was the tribe name of the O'Gradys, and became, as usual, that of their territory. Since the year 1318 this district comprised the parishes of Tomgraney, Inishcaltra, and Clonrush, of which the two latter are now included in the county of Galway, though belonging to the diocese of Killaloe.

722. Mac Conmara, now anglicised Mac Namara. This family derives its name from its ancestor Cumara, son of Domhnall, who ws the twenty-second in descent from Cormac Cas. His son Domhnall died in 1099.

723. Magh Adhair, a level district lying between the towns of Ennis and Tullagh, in the county of Clare. See Annals of Four Masters, A.d. 981, 1099, and 1599. It would appear that the family of the O'Hehirs were seated here before the Mac Namaras.

724. Ui-gCaisin. - The name and exact extent of this territory is preserved in the deanery of Ogashin, which comprises the parishes of Quin, Tullagh, Clooney, Doora, Kilraghtis, Kiltalagh, Templemaley, Inchicornan, and Kilmurry-na-gall, in the eastern part of the county of Clare. but in the year 1318, when after the defeat of De Clare and the expulsion of his allies - the Ui Bloid - O'Brien gave the Mac Namaras possession of a more extensive territory than Ogashin, lyinb between the rivers Fergus and Shannon, the exact limits of which, in 1584, are defined in a MS. account of Thomond, preserved in the library of Trinity College, Dublin, E., 2,14.

725. The Muinter-Lideadha, i.e., the O'Liddys, still extant, but reduced.

726. Clann-Dealbhaoith. - This was the tribe name of the O'Neills of Tradry, a fertile territory in the county of Clare, the extent of which is presered in the deanery of Tradry, which contains the parishes of Tomfinlough, Killnasoolagh, Kilmaleery, Kilconry, Clonloghan, Drumline, Feenagh, Bunratty, Killaneen, and the Island of Inis-da-drom, in the south of the county of Clare. After the defeat of De Clare and his adherents, O'Brien gave the Mac Namaras the whole of this territory, which is the richest in all Thomond.

727. Fionnluaraigh. - This name is now unknown. It seems to have been the name of the residence of the ancient chiefs of Tradry. The O'Neills of this race are still extant, but reduced to obscurity and poverty. If tradition may be relied upon, the family of Creagh is a branch of them.

728. O'm-Bloid. - This name is still preserved in the deanery of Omulloid, in the east of the county of Clare. the chief families of this territory were the O'Kennedys, O'Shanahans, O'Duracks, and O'Aherns, who were all driven out of it in 1318 by Turlogh O'Brien, in consequence of the assistance which they had given to De Clare.

729. Ui-Cearnaigh. - This was the tribe name of the O'Echtigherns, now O'Aherns, and was, as usual, applied to their territory. It comprised the parish of Kilfinaghty and a considerable portion of the district lying between it and the city of Limerick. The name of this territory is still locally preserved in that of the river Ogarney, whoch intersects the little town of Six-Mile-bridge, and unites with the Shannon near Bunratty. This river flows through the middle of the territory of the Ui-Cearnaigh, from near the castle of Enaghofline to that of Rosmanagher, after passing which it forms the boundary between Hy-Cearnaigh and Tradry. It was the ancestor of O'Ahern that granted the island of Inis-Sibtonn, now the King's Island, in the city of Limerick, to St. Munchin, from which it may be inferred that he enjoyed a larger territory than that which remained in the possession of his descendants.

730. Maicniadh's land. - This was a bardic appellation of Munster.

731. Ui-Ronghaile, the country of O'Seanchain. - This territory is frequently mentioned in the Caithreim Thoirdhealbaigh as the country of O'Shanahan, a chieftain of the Ui-Bloid who joined De Clare. He was driven out in the year 1318, and his country was given to his enemies, the Mac Namaras. Hy-Ronghaile comprised the parishes of Kilnoe and Killuran, and some of the adjoining districts; but the exact limits cannot now be determined.

732. Gleann Omra, now Glenomra, the country of O'Cinneidigh, now O'Kennedy. This territory is co-extensive with the parish of Killokennedy. The O'Kennedys were driven out of this territory during the struggles between the descendants of Turlogh and Brian Roe O'Brien, and they settled on the east side of the Shannon. Some of the race, however, remained behind, and their descendants are still extant in Glenomra and its vicinity in the condition of small farmers and cottiers.

700. Race of Donnchuan. - The O'Kennedys are the descendants of Donnchuan, brother of the famous Brian Borumha, who was monarch of Ireland from A.d. 1002 to 1014.

734. Muinter Diubhraic, i.e., the family of O'Diubhraic, now anglicised Durack, without the prefix O'. Dun-Braine, the name of their seat, is now unknown.

735. Tuath O'g-Conghaile, i.e., the territory of the Ui-Conghaile. This territory is probably co-extensive with the parish of Ogonnelloe, aliaas Aglish-Sinnell, which preserves its name.

736. Borumha, now Bealboroo, a fort near Killaloe, in the S.E. of the county of Clare.

737. Ui Toirdhealbhaigh. - The territory of this sept was bounded on the north by Ui Conghaile; on the east, by the Shannon; on the south and south-west by the river Shannon; and on the west, by Glenomra, the territory of O'Kennedy. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1192.

738. Flannan's Cill Dalua, i.e., Killaloe, of which St. Flannan is the patron saint.

739. Tuath Luimnigh. - A district verging on the city of Limerick. O'Cadhla is now anglicised Kealy, and O'Maille, O'Malley.

740. Ui Aimrit or Ui Aimeirt. - The situation of this sept is unknown. O'Duibhidhir, now O'Dwyer, was seated in the present barony of Kilnamnagh, in the county of Tipperary; but this appears to be a different family.

741. Caladh is on the north side of the river Shannon, near the city of Limerick, and extends from the Shannon to the southern boundary of the parish of Kilmurry na-Gaul. O'Ceadfadha is now anglicised Keating, but the true form would be O'Keaty.

742. Aos-tri-muighe, i.e., the people of the three plains. This territory comprised the whole of the present barony of Clanwilliam and a considerable part of what is now called the county of the city of Limerick. O'Conaing was seated at Caislen Ui-Chonaing, now Castleconnell, and his territory extended from Cnoc-Greine, near Pallas-Grean, to the city of Limerick. He was dispossessed by a branch of the Burkes shortly after the English Invasion. See Annals of the Four Masters, A.D. 1597, p. 2041, note z.

743. Craobh Cumhraidhe, i.e., the sweet or odoriferous branch, now Crecora, the name of a parish near the city of Limerick.

744. Uaithnes, now the baronies of Owney, in the counties of Limerick and Tipperary.

745. Uaithne-tire, now the barony of Owney, in the county of Tipperary.

746. Mag-Ceoch, now Mac Keogh, and Keogh. This family was seated at Ballymakeogh, near the river Mulkern, not far from the city of Limerick. The Rev. John Keogh, author of the "Irish Herbal and Irish Zoology" and of "Vindication of the Antiquities of Ireland," was of this sept, as he himself informs us, in the last-mentioned work, p. 142, where he states that he was the son of the Rev. John Keogh, of Strokestown, in the county Roscommon, the son of Denis, son of John, who was son of Anthony Keogh, of Cloonclieve, near the river Mulkern, within two miles of Limerick, where his ancestors enjoyed a very plentiful estate on both sides of the river Shannon and Mulkern. Compare Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, p. 167, and correct the error in the notice of this John which is given there.

747. Muinter Loingsigh, i.e., the family of O'Loinsigh, now anglicsed Lynch in this territory, though the same name is in other parts of Ireland anglicised Linchy and Linskey. William Lynch, Esq., author of the "Feudal Dignities," was of this family.

748. Uaithne-Cliach, now the barony of Owneybeg, in the east of the county of Limerick.

749. O'h-Ifearnan. - This name is now anglicised Heffernan, without the prefix O'. The name is rather common in the counties of Limerick and Tipperary.

750. O'Cathalain, now Cahallan, and more generally shortened to Callan. These families were dispossessed by the O'Mulryans, now Ryans, a Leinster family of the race of Cathaoir Mor.

751. Ara, now the barony of Ara or Duhara, in the north-west of the county of Tipperary. The people of Ara are of the Ulster race of Rudhrighe, being, according to the Irish genealogists, descended from Feartlachta, the son of Fergus Mac Roigh, king of Ulster in the first century. See Ogygia, Part III., cap. 46. There was another territory of this name called Ara Cliach, situate in the county of Limerick.

752. O'Donnagain, now Donegan without the O'. There are families of this name still extant in Tipperary, but among a very humble class. There were various other families of the name in Ireland of totally different races.

753. Crota Cliach. - This was the ancient name of the Galtee mountains in the county of Tipperary.

754. Mag Longachain. - This name is now obsolete, unless it be that anglicised Lanigan, which is pronounced O'Lonnagain and O'Luinegain among the Irish-speaking people.

755. Ui-Cuanach. - This name is preserved in the now barony of Coonagh, in the east of the county of Limerick; but, from its connexion with Crota Cliach, it would appear that is was originally far more extensive. It was a portion of Ara Cliach.

756. Muinter-Duibhidhir, now anglicised O'Dwyer and Dwyer. This family was seated in the present barony of Kilnamanagh, in the county of Tipperary. They seem to be different from the O'Duibhidhirs of Ui-Aimrit, already referred to.

757. Muinter Cearbhaill, i.e., the family of O'Cearbhaill, now anglicised O'Carroll, and more frequently Carroll wtihout the prefix O'.

758. Biorra's plain, i.e., the level district lying around Birr, now Parsonstown, in the King's County.

759. Eile. - This was the name of a tribe, which was, as usual among the ancient Irish, applied to a territory. It was derived from Eile, the seventh in descent from Cian, son of Oiliol Olum, king of Munster, in the third century. It contained the whole of Ely O'Carroll, which belonged originally to Munster, but is now assigned to King's County, and contains the baronies of Clonlisk and Ballybritt; in it wer also included the baronies of Ikerrin and Eliogarty, now in the county of Tipperary. The boundary between Ely O'Carroll and the ancient Meath is determined by that between the diocese of Killaloe and the diocese of Meath; for that portion of the King's County which belongs to the diocese of Killaloe was Ely O'Carroll, and originally belonged to Munster. The other portions of the original Ely, such as Ikerrin and Eliogarty, were withdrawn from O'Carroll shortly after the English Invasion, and added to the Earl of Ormond's country; however the native chieftains, O'Meagher and O'Fogarty, were left in possession, but tributary to the Earl of Ormond. See Leabhar na gCeart, pp. 78, 79, note i.

760. Cinel-Farga, Kinelarga, a territory in Ely-O'Carroll, nearly, if not exactly, coextensive with the present barony of Ballybrit, in the King's County. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1548, p. 1,509, note f. The O'Flanagans of this race are still extant, but all reduced to poverty and obscurity. The O'Flanagans of the line of Tadhg of the Battle of Crinna are to be distinguished from those of Clancahill, in the county of Roscommon, and of Tooraah, in the county of Fermanagh, who have been much more famous in Irish history.

761. Race of Tadhg, son of Cian of Crinna. - This has reference to Tadhg, (the ancestor of the O'Flanagans of this race, and also of O'Carroll), who assisted Cormac Mac Art in the battle of Crinna, in the third century, in reward for which king Cormac granted him the territory of Cianachta, in the east of ancient Meath. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 226, and O'Flaherty's Ogygia, Part III., c. 68.

762. Lec-Oilella. - This place, which was the seat of O'Flanagan, has not been identified.

763. Clann-Ruainne, and Mag Corcrain. - The exact situation of this territory has not been yet deterimined; Donogh Mac Corcrane was one of O'Carroll's freeholders in 1576, when O'Carroll made his submission to Queen Elizabeth. The name MacCorcrain is still extant, but anglicised Corcoran and Corkran, without the prefix Mac.

764. O'h-Aedhagain, now anglicised Egan. This name is to be distinguished from MacEgan, with which it is now confounded. Teige O'Hegan was one of O'Carroll's freeholders in 1576. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1576, p. 1690, note e.

765. Crich Cein. - This is only a bardic name for Ely-O'Carroll.

766. Clann Ionmainen. - This was the tribe name of the O'Hegans, but it is now forgotten, and the exact situation of O'Hegan is unknown to tradition.

767. Clann Maenaigh. - This was the tribe name of the O'Doolys, who were seated on the western face of Slieve Bloom, in Ely-O'Carroll. But this family had been originally chiefs of Fertullagh, in Westmeath, whence they were banished before the English Invasion by the O'Melaghlins. Donogh Oge O'Dowlye was one of O'Carroll's freeholders in 1576.

768. Bladhma, now Slieve Bloom, on the western face of which this family was situated.

769. Clann-Coinlegain. - This was the tribe name of the family of Mac Giolla-Phoil, now MacGilfoyle. This family had their seat at Suidhe-an-roin, now Shinrone, in 1576, when Sir William O'Carroll, chief of Ely, made his submission to the Lord Deputy, Sir Henry Sidney.

770. Hui-Deci. - This was the tribe name of the family of O'Banain, now Banan, originally seated at Leim Ui-Bhanain, now the Leap Castle, in the barony of Clonlisk, near Roscrea. William O'Banane was one of O'Carroll's freeholders in 1576. See Annals of Four Masters, 1514, 1516, 1576.

771. The O'Meachairs. - The name of this family is now anglicised O'Meagher, but more generally Meagher or Maher, without the prefix O'. Their territory of Ui-Ciarin is now called Ikerrin, and is a barony in the north of the present county of Tipperary.

772. Bearnan-Eile, i.e., the gapped mountain of Ely, now called in English the Devil's Bit Mountain.

773. Tuatha-Faralt. - This name is now obsolete. O'h-Ailche is now anglicised Halley.

774. Corca Thine, anglice Corkehenny. This is stillt he ecclesiastical name of the parish of Templemore, in the county of Tipperary. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1580, p. 1749, note a.

775. Druim-sailech, i.e., dorsum salicum, a conspicuous ridge in the barony of Ikerrin, about five miles to the south of Roscrea. The castle of Moydrum stands upon it. See Annals of Four Masters, A.D. 1601, p. 2276.

776. O'Cathail, now Cahill, without the prefix O'.

777. The Southern Eile. - This is Eliogarty, i.e., Eile Ui-Fhogartaigh, or O'Fogarty's Ely, a barony in the county of Tipperary.

778. Eochaidh Baillderg. - He was the son of Caerthann Fionn, king of Thomond, in St. Patrick's time. See Ogygia, Part III., c. 82. According to this, O'Fogarty was not of the Elian race, but of the Dal-Cais of Thomond.

779. O'Fogarta, now anglicised Fogarty, without the prefix O'. This family became extinct, in the senior line, in the last century, and was succeeded by the Lanigans of Castlefogarty.

780. Corca-Aela. - Exact situation not discovered. The families here mentioned are now totally unknown.

781. Ui-Lughdhach, otherwise called Ui-Luighdheach, or Ileagh, formerly a separate barony, and shown as such in the Down Survey, but now included in the barony of Eliogarty.

782. O'Spealain. - This name is now anglicised Spillan and Spollan, without the prefix O'.